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wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Major contract to design and install track and tunnel equipment
Works to commence in 2014 as Crossrail tunnels complete
Crossrail today announced that a contract notice has been placed in the Official Journal of the European Union seeking expressions of interest for the major fit-out of the new rail tunnels. The indicative value of the contract is in the region of £400m.
Construction of Crossrail’s tunnels will get underway in spring 2012 when the first tunnel boring machine is launched from Royal Oak. By late 2014, the construction of over 21km of twin-bore tunnel, stretching across the capital via central London and Docklands, will have been completed.

As construction concludes, an equally herculean task will get to underway to fit-out the tunnels with tracks and other equipment to enable Crossrail trains to operate from 2018. This will include the installation of over 40km of track, overhead electric conductor rails to power the trains as well as ventilation and drainage systems.

This major contract will contribute towards the creation of further employment opportunities on Crossrail. Up to 14,000 people will be employed on the Crossrail project at the height of construction between 2013 and 2015.

Andy Mitchell, Crossrail Programme Director said: “As the new Crossrail tunnels are completed, work will get underway to fit the tunnels out with the necessary track and overhead power equipment to enable the railway to operate. Such is the scale and complexity of the task it will take several years to complete the fit-out works with people working around the clock to complete the job.”

The new Crossrail tunnels will also require over 50 ventilation fans, 40km of walkways, 60 drainage pumps, 30km of fire mains as well as lighting throughout the entire length.

The fit-out works will be carried out within the entire tunnelled section of the Crossrail route between Royal Oak, Pudding Mill Lane and Plumstead Portals. It is envisaged that the selected contractor will start fit-out simultaneously from both Royal Oak and Plumstead portals.

Contract will be awarded in late 2012, providing the chosen contractor with sufficient time to undertake detailed design and planning before fit-out work commences in 2014.

Ends

For further information contact the Crossrail Press Office on 020 3229 9552 or email ressoffice@crossrail.co.uk">pressoffice@crossrail.co.uk

Notes to Editors

The C610 Systemwide main works contract incorporates the C630 Tunnel Mechanical & Electrical Systems contract. The closing date for expressions of interest is 3 November 2011.

The C610 Systemwide main works will begin when the tunnelling drives are completed in 2014. The tunnel fit-out works will be completed by 2017/18.

When C610 works begin, the contractors providing high-voltage power, communication and signalling systems will work alongside the C610 teams to complete the fit-out of the tunnels. These works will be let as separate contracts.
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Herrenknecht AG to build final two tunnel boring machines (TBMs)
Eight tunnel boring machines to be manufactured for Crossrail
First Crossrail TBMs to come off the production line at end of 2011
Crossrail tunnelling to commence in spring 2012 from Royal Oak, near Paddington
The remaining two tunnel boring machines (TBMs) required to construct Crossrail will be manufactured by Herrenknecht AG, Germany. The final two TBMs will dig Crossrail’s Thames Tunnel in south-east London.
Once complete, Crossrail will dramatically cut journey times for travellers in south east London. From Abbey Wood, Crossrail will reach Canary Wharf in 11 minutes, Liverpool Street in 17 minutes, Tottenham Court Road in 23 minutes and Heathrow in just 51 minutes.

To construct the 21km of twin-bored tunnel required for Crossrail, eight tunnel boring machines will be required and will undertake ten individual tunnel drives to construct the 6m diameter rail tunnels. The first two TBMs will launch from Royal Oak in spring 2012.

Earlier this year, Herrenknecht AG was selected by the major tunnelling contractors to build the first six tunnel boring machines for Crossrail.

Construction of the Thames Tunnel is being undertaken by a Joint Venture comprising Hochtief Construction AG and J Murphy & Sons Ltd who have selected Herrenknecht AG to construct the remaining two TBMs. There are no UK-based tunnel boring machine manufacturers.

Slurry TBMs will be used to construct the 2.6km twin bore Thames Tunnel due to the chalk ground conditions in this part of the capital. The remainder of the tunnels, between Royal Oak, Pudding Mill Lane and Victoria Dock Portal will be constructed using Earth Pressure Balance Machines which will pass through ground which is predominantly London clay, sand and gravels.

The Slurry TBMs will be launched from Plumstead Portal in late 2012 and will tunnel westwards towards North Woolwich. Construction of Plumstead Portal is now underway with work for North Woolwich Portal commencing in early 2012.

The first two Crossrail TBMs are currently being manufactured. Factory assembly of these TBMs begins in October and will complete during November. The tunnel boring machines will then be factory tested before being dis-assembled in readiness for shipping to London. The first TBM components will begin arriving in the UK at Tilbury Docks in December with the second TBM arriving later in January. The TBM components will be transported to Westbourne Park for re-assembly.

Herrenknecht AG will also deliver two TBMs to Limmo Peninsula for the eastern running tunnels in mid 2012, two machines to Stepney Green and two machines to Plumstead later in 2012. The TBMs required for Crossrail will be up to 120m in length and weigh around 850 tonnes.

Andy Mitchell, Crossrail Programme Director said: “Work to manufacture the components for the first two Crossrail tunnel boring machines TBMs will shortly complete allowing the assembly process to begin. The TBMs will be fully assembled and tested at the factory over the next couple of months before being dis-assembled and transported to the UK ahead of tunnelling commencing at Royal Oak in spring 2012. A total of eight TBMs will be constructed for Crossrail with the remaining TBMs delivered to London throughout 2012.”

As the TBMs advance forward, precast concrete segments will be built in rings behind the TBMs. Concrete segments for the western running tunnels between Royal Oak and Farringdon will be manufactured at Old Oak Common.

Work is now underway to construct the tunnel segment factory on railway land at Old Oak Common and on is track to be completed later this year.

When operational, the facility will contain 216 moulds for the 75,000 concrete segments needed to line Crossrail’s western running tunnels. Approximately 50 people will be employed on-site and it will churn out over 200 segments per day at peak. The factory is being built specifically for the production of Crossrail tunnel segments and once tunnelling is complete, it will be removed.

Crossrail is currently finalising arrangements with the tunnelling contractors regarding the location of the other concrete segment manufacturing sites.

Ends

For further information contact Crossrail Press Office on 0203 2299 552 or emailpressoffice@crossrail.co.uk

Notes to Editors:

Herrenknecht AG is based in Schwanau, Germany. Schwanau is located close to the German / French border, about 100km south of Strasbourg.

In spring 2012, the first two tunnel boring machines will start on their journey from Royal Oak towards Farringdon. This will be followed later in 2012 by the launch of two further tunnel boring machines in Docklands that will head towards Farringdon under central London. The Thames Tunnel drives will commence at the end of 2012, followed by further shorter tunnel drives under the Royal Docks and east London.

The five tunnels to be constructed are:

Royal Oak to Farringdon west (Drive X) - length of drive approximately 6.1 km
Limmo Peninsula in the Royal Docks to Farringdon east (Drive Y) - length of drive approximately 8.3 km
Pudding Mill Lane to Stepney Green (Drive Z) - length of drive approximately 2.7 km
Limmo Peninsula in the Royal Docks to Victoria Dock Portal (Drive G) - length of drive approximately 0.9 km
Plumstead to North Woolwich (Drive H) - length of drive approximately 2.6 km
All of this adds up to 42km of bored tunnels located below the busy streets of London.

Crossrail’s tunnel boring machines will be employed as follows:

Royal Oak to Farringdon (Drive X) – 2 x earth pressure balanced TBMs
Limmo to Farringdon (Drive Y) – 2 x earth pressure balanced TBMs
Plumstead to North Woolwich (Drive H) – 2 x slurry TBMs
Pudding Mill Lane to Stepney Green (Drive Z) – 2 x earth pressure balance TBMs
Five tunnel portals will be constructed as part of Crossrail at Royal Oak, Pudding Mill Lane, North Woolwich, Victoria Dock and Plumstead.

The main Western and Eastern running tunnels will have tunnel portals at Royal Oak, Pudding Mill Lane and Victoria Dock. The tunnel boring machines (TBMs) will commence their eastbound journey under London from Royal Oak and westbound from the Royal Docks.

To deliver Crossrail services to Abbey Wood, a tunnel will be constructed between North Woolwich and Plumstead – the Thames Tunnel. Tunnel portals will be constructed at either end in advance of the main tunnelling works.

Tunnel construction schedule:

Location of Tunnel Drive
TBM Launch
Tunnel Drive Complete

Royal Oak to Farringdon (Drive X)
Second Quarter 2012
Third Quarter 2013

Limmo Peninsula to Farringdon (Drive Y)
Third Quarter 2012
Third Quarter 2014

Stepney Green to Pudding Mill Lane (Drive Z)
Fourth Quarter 2013
Third Quarter 2014

Limmo Peninsula to Victoria Dock Portal (Drive G)
Second Quarter 2014
Third Quarter 2014

Plumstead to North Woolwich (Drive H)
Fourth Quarter 2012
Second Quarter 2014
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Construction of Royal Oak portal, the first of five tunnel portals on the Crossrail route is now complete. Work is underway to prepare the site for the start of Crossrail tunnelling next year.
The tunnel portals will act as an entry point for the tunnel boring machines that will construct the Crossrail tunnels and in future will provide an entrance and exit for trains to the underground sections of Crossrail.

Construction of Crossrail’s tunnels will get underway in spring 2012 when the first tunnel boring machine is launched from Royal Oak. This will be followed by the launch of further TBMs to construct the remaining tunnels for the new Crossrail service.

Construction of Royal Oak Portal was completed nearly one month ahead of schedule.

Ailie MacAdam, Crossrail Central Section Delivery Director said: “Crossrail has now reached its first tunnelling milestone with the completion of Royal Oak Portal. Work is now underway to prepare for the arrival of the tunnel boring machines ahead of tunnelling commencing in spring 2012.”

Construction of Royal Oak Portal got underway in January 2010. The portal has been built within a narrow corridor at Royal Oak, bordered by the A40 Westway to the north and the Hammersmith & City line and Network Rail lines to the south.

The works comprise a massive ramp structure that will take the Crossrail tracks from ground-level down into the underground tunnels. A total of 25,000 m3 of ground was excavated to construct the tunnel portal with the excavated material re-used at construction sites in London.

At the deepest end of the ramp, a concrete headwall was constructed with a pair of 7.24m diameter tunnel ‘eyes’ created for the installation of steel rings. The tunnel ‘eyes’ mark the exact location of where the tunnel boring machines will commence tunnelling at Royal Oak. The tunnel eyes and rings have an important role to play in supporting the tunnel opening when the TBMs break-through the headwall.

The Paddington New Yard site, containing both the Royal Oak portal and Westbourne Park worksites, has now been handed over to the contractor undertaking construction of the Crossrail tunnels between Royal Oak and Farringdon. The contractor has begun to mobilise on-site ahead of tunnelling starting next spring and will also undertake the assembly of the tunnel boring machines at Westbourne Park.

Prehistoric animal bones were uncovered by archaeologists during excavation for the portal. The remains included those of the Auroch, a large ancestor of modern cattle and their discovery is of scientific importance. The prehistoric bones are now being studied before they are incorporated into the Natural History Museum’s permanent collection.

A total of five tunnel portals will be constructed for Crossrail at Royal Oak to the west of Paddington, Pudding Mill Lane near Stratford, Victoria Dock and North Woolwich in the Royal Docks and Plumstead near Woolwich.

Main construction at Pudding Mill Lane Portal is now underway with enabling works progressing at North Woolwich and Plumstead portal sites. Construction of Victoria Dock Portal will get underway in autumn 2012.
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Construction of Royal Oak portal, the first of five tunnel portals on the Crossrail route is now complete. Work is underway to prepare the site for the start of Crossrail tunnelling next year.

The tunnel portals will act as an entry point for the tunnel boring machines that will construct the Crossrail tunnels and in future will provide an entrance and exit for trains to the underground sections of Crossrail.

Construction of Crossrail’s tunnels will get underway in spring 2012 when the first tunnel boring machine is launched from Royal Oak. This will be followed by the launch of further TBMs to construct the remaining tunnels for the new Crossrail service.

Construction of Royal Oak Portal was completed nearly one month ahead of schedule.

Ailie MacAdam, Crossrail Central Section Delivery Director said: “Crossrail has now reached its first tunnelling milestone with the completion of Royal Oak Portal. Work is now underway to prepare for the arrival of the tunnel boring machines ahead of tunnelling commencing in spring 2012.”

Construction of Royal Oak Portal got underway in January 2010. The portal has been built within a narrow corridor at Royal Oak, bordered by the A40 Westway to the north and the Hammersmith & City line and Network Rail lines to the south.

The works comprise a massive ramp structure that will take the Crossrail tracks from ground-level down into the underground tunnels. A total of 25,000 m3 of ground was excavated to construct the tunnel portal with the excavated material re-used at construction sites in London.

At the deepest end of the ramp, a concrete headwall was constructed with a pair of 7.24m diameter tunnel ‘eyes’ created for the installation of steel rings. The tunnel ‘eyes’ mark the exact location of where the tunnel boring machines will commence tunnelling at Royal Oak. The tunnel eyes and rings have an important role to play in supporting the tunnel opening when the TBMs break-through the headwall.

The Paddington New Yard site, containing both the Royal Oak portal and Westbourne Park worksites, has now been handed over to the contractor undertaking construction of the Crossrail tunnels between Royal Oak and Farringdon. The contractor has begun to mobilise on-site ahead of tunnelling starting next spring and will also undertake the assembly of the tunnel boring machines at Westbourne Park.

Prehistoric animal bones were uncovered by archaeologists during excavation for the portal. The remains included those of the Auroch, a large ancestor of modern cattle and their discovery is of scientific importance. The prehistoric bones are now being studied before they are incorporated into the Natural History Museum’s permanent collection.

A total of five tunnel portals will be constructed for Crossrail at Royal Oak to the west of Paddington, Pudding Mill Lane near Stratford, Victoria Dock and North Woolwich in the Royal Docks and Plumstead near Woolwich.

Main construction at Pudding Mill Lane Portal is now underway with enabling works progressing at North Woolwich and Plumstead portal sites. Construction of Victoria Dock Portal will get underway in autumn 2012.
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
The UK's Crossrail has released tenders worth £400m for a track and tunnel equipment design contract as part of the London rail link.

The 21km twin-bore tunnel, which will span central London and the Docklands, is scheduled for completion by late 2014.

Crossrail is also seeking bidders for fit out the new rail tunnel; the work comprises installation of over 40km of track, overhead electric conductor rails to power the trains and ventilation and drainage systems.

The new Crossrail tunnels will also require over 50 ventilation fans, 40km of walkways, 60 drainage pumps and 30km of fire mains, as well as lighting throughout the entire length.

The fit-out works will be carried out in the tunnel section between Royal Oak, Pudding Mill Lane and Plumstead.

The contract for the fit-out will be awarded in late 2012 while work will start in 2014 for completion in 2018
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Latest news from Crossrailnews


Crossrail Royal Oak Portal construction complete

Costain and Skanska have finished construction of the Royal Oak Portal, the first major civil engineering work for London's Crossrail project.

The portal consists of a 285 metre long ramp down to the concrete headwall where Crossrail's first tunnel boring machine will be launched in spring 2012. Two 7.24 metre tunnel eyes have been cast and include steel rings to support the tunnel openings when the TBMs break thr ough.

Situated in a 21 metre wide corridor between the A40 Westway and the Underground and main line railway lines out of Paddington, sheet pile and diaphragm walls have been constructed on either side of the ramp and are braced by concrete and steel struts as the ramp approaches what will be the twin bore tunnel mouths.

Major works for C330 finished last week 20 days ahead of schedule and at a cost of £25m, said to be under budget. Minor snagging and drainage works for London Underground remain to be signed off.

Costain/Skanska workers have left the site which has been handed over to main tunnel contractor BAM Nuttall/Ferrovial Agroman/Kier (C300) to complete preparations for the arrival of the two TBMs that will be launched from Royal Oak. Among the jobs to be done BFK will lay temporary rails to transport the TBMs from the assembly site at Westbourne Park and concrete tunnel segments from Old Oak Common to the tunnel eyes. BFK will also sink three rows of piles on the Paddington side of the portal which will act as supporting walls until the tunnels are deep enough underground not to require any additional strengthening.

During C330 works Costain and Skanska have taken on three apprentices and employed two interns from Westminster Academy. Site materials, plant and accommodation are being transferred on to other contractors as part of a Crossrail policy to reuse resources where possible.

The Royal Oak Portal was designed by Capita Symonds (C150) and enabling works got underway in January 2010 with main construction starting in April.

Ailie MacAdam, Crossrail central section delivery director, said: "Crossrail has reached its first tunnelling milestone with the completion of Royal Oak Portal. Work is now underway to prepare for the arrival of the tunnel boring machines ahead of tunnelling commencing in spring 2012."
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Excavated material will be used to create new 1,500 acre RSPB nature reserve at Wallasea Island in Essex
Jetty construction underway at Wallasea Island to enable ships to transport excavated material to Essex
Work is now underway at Wallasea Island in Essex to prepare for the arrival of excavated material from Crossrail tunnels next year. Crossrail has begun constructing a new jetty where ships will offload material for the nature reserve.
Tunnelling for Crossrail will produce in the region of 6 million tonnes of material which will be excavated from constructing the 21km of twin-bore tunnel. Close to 100% of the excavated material is expected to be clean, uncontaminated and reusable elsewhere.

The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) will require 10 million tonnes of excavated material to create a new 1,500 acre nature reserve - one of the largest new wetland nature reserves in Europe for some 50 years.

Crossrail will provide close to 4.5 million tonnes of excavated material to the RSPB. The remainder of Crossrail’s excavated material will be beneficially reused elsewhere.

Wallasea Island Wild Coast project is a landmark conservation and engineering scheme for the 21st century, on a scale never before attempted in the UK and the largest of its type in Europe. The aim of this project is to combat the threats from climate change and coastal flooding by recreating the ancient wetland landscape of mudflats and saltmarsh, lagoons and pasture. It will also help to compensate for the loss of such tidal habitats elsewhere in England.

The new jetty is due to be completed by summer 2012. The works are being undertaken by BAM Nuttall.

The jetty is sized to take two ships of approximately 2,500 tonnes at the same time.  At peak, it is expected that five ships per day will be arriving at Wallasea.  The Crouch Harbour Authority have agreed the works and, with support and assistance from Crossrail, has carried out major improvements to the buoyage of the River Crouch approach channels from Whitaker Spit inwards to Burnham Fairway.

Crossrail tunnelling will commence at Royal Oak in spring 2012 with the first ships containing the excavated material arriving at Wallasea Island during summer 2012.

Excavated material generated from the tunnelling operations for the western tunnels (Royal Oak to Farringdon) will exit at the Royal Oak Portal and be transported by freight train to Northfleet, Kent.

The Northfleet site will receive all the excavated material from Crossrail’s western tunnels. The primary purpose of the site is to receive excavated material by rail and briefly store it before loading it onto ships for delivery to Wallasea.

Northfleet has been chosen because it is located on the River Thames with deep water wharfage and disused links to the National Rail network, offering Crossrail the ability to transport excavated material from the new tunnels by rail and then transfer onto ship.

Reinstatement of the freight rail link into the Northfleet site from the North Kent Line is now underway and will be commissioned in January 2012. The length of the rail link is around 2.25km and in total 4.75km of new track will be provided.

Andy Mitchell, Crossrail Programme Director said: “Crossrail is committed to delivering the new railway in the most sustainable way possible. At least two-thirds of all Crossrail excavated material will be used to create a huge new RSPB wildlife reserve at Wallasea Island in Essex with the remainder destined for other regeneration sites.

“All of the excavated material from Crossrail’s western tunnels will be transported to Wallasea Island by freight train and ship to minimise the number of Crossrail lorries in central London.  Work is underway to construct the new jetty at Wallasea Island ahead of the first delivery of excavated material next summer.”

Shaun Thomas, RSPB Director of Operations said: “The RSPB is delighted to be working with Crossrail at Wallasea Island. This excavated material will help create new coastal habitats where some of the UK’s most incredible wildlife will thrive.  And it’s not just wildlife that will benefit from this partnership, the local communities, families, tourists and nature lovers will be able to visit and enjoy Wallasea Island for generations to come.”

C300 western running tunnels contractor BFK (BAM/Ferrovial/Kier JV) will shortly appoint a rail freight operator to transport excavated material from Royal Oak to Northfleet.

Freight trains will travel from Westbourne Park to Northfleet via the Great Western Main Line, the Greenford Loop, West London Line, Clapham and Lewisham. Up to five freight trains will operate from Westbourne Park on Mondays to Saturdays with up to four trains on Sundays. To enable these freight trains to operate, additional sidings will be constructed at Westbourne Park with improvement work undertaken to track and embankments on the Greenford Loop.

Excavated material from the eastern tunnels (running from Limmo Peninsula to Farringdon) will emerge from the Limmo shaft. This material will be transported via conveyor belts to Instone Wharf for direct loading onto ships and onward transportation to Wallasea Island.

For the Thames Tunnel which will be constructed between Plumstead and North Woolwich, the excavated slurry material will emerge at the Plumstead Portal, where it will be filter pressed to reduce its water content before transportation for reuse.
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Fencing around the site of the Plumstead portal is now complete along with a large block of site offices and a couple of workshop/stores buildings. This site now appears ready for actual consruction to begin.
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
A Costain-Skanska joint venture (JV) has completed construction work on Royal Oak portal in west London and handed it over to Crossrail, UK's major rail infrastructure project.

The portal near Paddington will be the transition ramp for trains entering and exiting the central London tunnel.

Trains will traverse along a gradual gradient for several hundred yards prior to entering the tunnel.

The Costain-Skanska JV excavated a total of 25,000m3 of ground to construct the portal, and constructed a concrete headwall with a pair of 7.24m-diameter tunnel 'eyes' at the deepest end of the ramp.

The Royal Oak tunnel portal will act as an entry point for the tunnel boring machines that will start constructing the Crossrail tunnels next year.

The tunnel portal is the first of five to be completed on the Crossrail route, which is a new 118km high-frequency rail route that will run from Maidenhead and Heathrow in the west to Stepney Green, for Shenfield near Brentwood and Abbey Wood, in south-east London.

The contract for the Royal Oak portal was awarded to Costain-Skanska in 2010 as part of an advanced works civils framework contract totalling £100m.
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Crossrail recently announced that a contract notice has been placed in the Official Journal of the European Union seeking expressions of interest for the major fit-out of the new rail tunnels.

The indicative value of the contract is in the region of £400m.

Construction of Crossrail’s tunnels will get underway in spring 2012 when the first tunnel boring machine is launched from Royal Oak.

By late 2014, the construction of over 21km of twin-bore tunnel, stretching across the capital via central London and Docklands, will have been completed.

As construction concludes, an equally herculean task will get to underway to fit-out the tunnels with tracks and other equipment to enable Crossrail trains to operate from 2018.

This will include the installation of over 40km of track, overhead electric conductor rails to power the trains as well as ventilation and drainage systems.

This major contract will contribute towards the creation of further employment opportunities on Crossrail. Up to 14,000 people will be employed on the Crossrail project at the height of construction between 2013 and 2015.

Andy Mitchell, Crossrail Programme Director said:

“As the new Crossrail tunnels are completed, work will get underway to fit the tunnels out with the necessary track and overhead power equipment to enable the railway to operate.

“Such is the scale and complexity of the task it will take several years to complete the fit-out works with people working around the clock to complete the job.”

The new Crossrail tunnels will also require over 50 ventilation fans, 40km of walkways, 60 drainage pumps, 30km of fire mains as well as lighting throughout the entire length.

The fit-out works will be carried out within the entire tunnelled section of the Crossrail route between Royal Oak, Pudding Mill Lane and Plumstead Portals.

It is envisaged that the selected contractor will start fit-out simultaneously from both Royal Oak and Plumstead portals.

Contracts will be awarded in late 2012, providing the chosen contractor with sufficient time to undertake detailed design and planning before fit-out work commences in 2014.
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Work is now underway at Wallasea Island in Essex to prepare for the arrival of excavated material from Crossrail tunnels next year.

Crossrail has begun constructing a new jetty where ships will offload material for the nature reserve.

Tunnelling for Crossrail will produce in the region of 6 million tonnes of material which will be excavated from constructing the 21km of twin-bore tunnel.

Close to 100% of the excavated material is expected to be clean, uncontaminated and reusable elsewhere.

The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) will require 10 million tonnes of excavated material to create a new 1,500 acre nature reserve – one of the largest new wetland nature reserves in Europe for some 50 years.

Crossrail will provide close to 4.5 million tonnes of excavated material to the RSPB. The remainder of Crossrail’s excavated material will be beneficially reused elsewhere.

Wallasea Island Wild Coast project is a landmark conservation and engineering scheme for the 21st century, on a scale never before attempted in the UK and the largest of its type in Europe.

The aim of this project is to combat the threats from climate change and coastal flooding by recreating the ancient wetland landscape of mudflats and saltmarsh, lagoons and pasture. It will also help to compensate for the loss of such tidal habitats elsewhere in England.

The new jetty is due to be completed by summer 2012. The works are being undertaken by BAM Nuttall.

The jetty is sized to take two ships of approximately 2,500 tonnes at the same time. At peak, it is expected that five ships per day will be arriving at Wallasea.

The Crouch Harbour Authority have agreed the works and, with support and assistance from Crossrail, has carried out major improvements to the buoyage of the River Crouch approach channels from Whitaker Spit inwards to Burnham Fairway.

Crossrail tunnelling will commence at Royal Oak in spring 2012 with the first ships containing the excavated material arriving at Wallasea Island during summer 2012.

Excavated material generated from the tunnelling operations for the western tunnels (Royal Oak to Farringdon) will exit at the Royal Oak Portal and be transported by freight train to Northfleet, Kent.

The Northfleet site will receive all the excavated material from Crossrail’s western tunnels. The primary purpose of the site is to receive excavated material by rail and briefly store it before loading it onto ships for delivery to Wallasea.

Northfleet has been chosen because it is located on the River Thames with deep water wharfage and disused links to the National Rail network, offering Crossrail the ability to transport excavated material from the new tunnels by rail and then transfer onto ship.

Reinstatement of the freight rail link into the Northfleet site from the North Kent Line is now underway and will be commissioned in January 2012. The length of the rail link is around 2.25km and in total 4.75km of new track will be provided.

Andy Mitchell, Crossrail Programme Director said:

“Crossrail is committed to delivering the new railway in the most sustainable way possible.

“At least two-thirds of all Crossrail excavated material will be used to create a huge new RSPB wildlife reserve at Wallasea Island in Essex with the remainder destined for other regeneration sites.

“All of the excavated material from Crossrail’s western tunnels will be transported to Wallasea Island by freight train and ship to minimise the number of Crossrail lorries in central London.

“Work is underway to construct the new jetty at Wallasea Island ahead of the first delivery of excavated material next summer.”

Shaun Thomas, RSPB Director of Operations said:

“The RSPB is delighted to be working with Crossrail at Wallasea Island. This excavated material will help create new coastal habitats where some of the UK’s most incredible wildlife will thrive.

“And it’s not just wildlife that will benefit from this partnership, the local communities, families, tourists and nature lovers will be able to visit and enjoy Wallasea Island for generations to come.”

C300 western running tunnels contractor BFK (BAM/Ferrovial/Kier JV) will shortly appoint a rail freight operator to transport excavated material from Royal Oak to Northfleet.

Freight trains will travel from Westbourne Park to Northfleet via the Great Western Main Line, the Greenford Loop, West London Line, Clapham and Lewisham.

Up to five freight trains will operate from Westbourne Park on Mondays to Saturdays with up to four trains on Sundays.

To enable these freight trains to operate, additional sidings will be constructed at Westbourne Park with improvement work undertaken to track and embankments on the Greenford Loop.

Excavated material from the eastern tunnels (running from Limmo Peninsula to Farringdon) will emerge from the Limmo shaft. This material will be transported via conveyor belts to Instone Wharf for direct loading onto ships and onward transportation to Wallasea Island.

For the Thames Tunnel which will be constructed between Plumstead and North Woolwich, the excavated slurry material will emerge at the Plumstead Portal, where it will be filter pressed to reduce its water content before transportation for reuse
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
UK’s first dedicated tunnelling and underground training facility to be fully open by early 2012
Tunnelling and Underground Construction Academy to offer training to at least 3,500 people over the lifetime of the Crossrail project
National Construction College appointed to deliver the Academy’s curriculum
Further industry sponsorship agreement finalised
The £13m Tunnelling and Underground Construction Academy (TUCA) has welcomed its first students.
The first training courses to be offered at the Academy include the Tunnel Safety Card, pre-requisite for anyone who will work below ground on Crossrail, and Construction Skills Certification Scheme health and safety card training. Vocational courses initially on offer are pre-cast concrete manufacture and tunnel operations training.

Between now and the end of the year, a variety of other vocational training courses will begin to be offered, increasing the number of students attending the new campus.

Work to install tunnelling plant and machinery in the major vocational training areas, including a static tunnel boring machine and a simulated tunnel environment, will complete by the end of the year. This will allow students to gain experience in the practical skills required for underground construction.

By early 2012, the Academy will be fully open for business with the full curriculum in delivery and the vocational training areas operational. Up to 150 students will be attending courses offered through the Academy at any one time.

Located at Ilford in east London, TUCA aims to address the shortage of people with the necessary skills to work on Crossrail and other tunnelling projects in London and the UK. It also has the potential to assist European projects.

The Tunnelling and Underground Construction Academy will offer training to at least 3,500 people over the lifetime of the Crossrail project alone. The only other dedicated tunnelling training facility in Europe is located in Switzerland.

Mayor of London, Boris Johnson said: “I am a huge supporter of the aims of this academy and I am thrilled that it is now enrolling its first students. At the height of construction many thousands of people will be working on Crossrail and it will provide a huge economic boost to the capital. Our new academy in east London will be a vital resource and Crossrail is working closely with job centres along the route to ensure as many local people as possible are able to learn the skills necessary to play a part in the largest construction project in the southeast for 50 years.”

Rail Minister Theresa Villiers said: “Investing in this Academy further emphasises Government’s commitment to rebalancing our economy and promoting the skills our young people need to help Britain compete in the world.

“This Academy’s legacy will be a new generation of specialists able to help deliver important infrastructure projects to support growth here and anywhere across the globe.”

Terry Morgan, Crossrail Chairman said: “Crossrail is gearing up for the start of tunnelling next spring and we have now commenced specialist training for the first of many thousands who will work on the project. The Tunnelling and Underground Construction Academy will have a critical role to play in equipping people, particularly those from along the Crossrail route, with the necessary training and skills to work below ground. The Academy will not only act as a centre of excellence for tunnelling and underground construction in the UK but also for European tunnelling projects longer-term.”

TUCA students will be made up of new entrants to the industry as well as Crossrail’s contractors’ existing workforces. Those already working in the industry can up-skill or formalise their knowledge through nationally accredited technical and safety training including apprenticeships, NVQs and other programmes.

TUCA is a large structure, approximately 100 metres long, 36 metres wide and 12 metres high. The total size of the Academy extends to 3,600 sq. metres.

Facilities will replicate the key areas of a fully-automated tunnelling project. These will include a simulated tunnel boring machine environment, supported by a TBM backup area, with a loco and narrow gauge railway to the rear. There will be a separate chamber for Sprayed Concrete operations in addition to a large underground construction workshop. TUCA will also have four teaching rooms, a test centre for online safety tests, a large refectory and a Learning Resource Centre.

National Construction College (NCC) has been appointed to deliver skills and training at the Academy. NCC will complete the development of the curriculum and deliver the Academy’s full range of accredited and bespoke skills programmes.

An Industry Advisory Panel, comprising representatives from client and contractor organisations involved in underground construction, will ensure the training on offer at TUCA is world-class and responsive to the needs of industry. The Panel will include representatives of Thames Water and National Grid.

Crossrail also announced a further sponsorship deal for the Tunnelling and Underground Construction Academy.  BASF Meyco Equipment are to donate plant and construction supplies worth £600,000.

BASF Meyco Equipment joins National Grid, Interocean Personnel Services and New Civil Engineer magazine who have already signed-up to support the Academy. Further sponsorship deals are currently being finalised with the construction industry including key Crossrail suppliers.

Terry Morgan continued: “I’m delighted we have secured this major industry commitment towards the Tunnelling and Underground Construction Academy. This donation of plant and machinery will provide students with the opportunity to gain first-hand practical experience of working with tunnelling equipment. The Academy will be a major UK training facility for the construction industry that will not only support Crossrail but also other infrastructure projects. TUCA has been built by the construction industry to specifically meet its future needs.”

In addition to the Tunnelling and Underground Construction Academy, Crossrail has committed to delivering at least 400 apprentices through its supply chain over the lifetime of the project. The first 20 apprentices are now employed on Crossrail and this number will increase as intensive station construction and tunnelling gets underway.

Crossrail is also working with Jobcentre Plus (JCP) to provide local people with opportunities to work on the Crossrail project. Jobcentre Plus works with a network of local job brokerage and outreach agencies to match vacancies to suitable candidates and arrange interviews for short-listed applicants.

Contractors are obliged to send all employment opportunities to the job brokerage service 48 hours before they advertise them elsewhere. This gives the team an early opportunity to put forward job-ready candidates from the local area.
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Crossrail has confirmed the shortlist for the central section signalling system.

The following organisations will be invited to tender later this year:

•Bombardier Transportation UK Limited
•Invensys Rail Limited
•Siemens PLC
•Signalling Solutions Limited
•Thales Rail Signalling Solutions Limited.
Crossrail will operate a high-frequency metro service of up to 24 trains per hour during the peak between Whitechapel and Paddington through new-tunnels under central London.

Construction of the new tunnels will get underway in spring 2012 when the first tunnel boring machine is launched from Royal Oak.

The new signalling system will incorporate Automatic Train Operation to support the delivery of a reliable, high-frequency metro service and must also be capable of enhancement to 30 trains per hour through the central section at a later date.
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
The final two TBMs will dig Crossrail’s Thames Tunnel in south-east London.

Once complete, Crossrail will dramatically cut journey times for travellers in south east London.

From Abbey Wood, Crossrail will reach Canary Wharf in 11 minutes, Liverpool Street in 17 minutes, Tottenham Court Road in 23 minutes and Heathrow in just 51 minutes.

To construct the 21km of twin-bored tunnel required for Crossrail, eight tunnel boring machines will be required and will undertake ten individual tunnel drives to construct the 6m diameter rail tunnels. The first two TBMs will launch from Royal Oak in spring 2012.

Earlier this year, Herrenknecht AG was selected by the major tunnelling contractors to build the first six tunnel boring machines for Crossrail.

Construction of the Thames Tunnel is being undertaken by a Joint Venture comprising Hochtief Construction AG and J Murphy & Sons Ltd who have selected Herrenknecht AG to construct the remaining two TBMs. There are no UK-based tunnel boring machine manufacturers.

Slurry TBMs will be used to construct the 2.6km twin bore Thames Tunnel due to the chalk ground conditions in this part of the capital.

The remainder of the tunnels, between Royal Oak, Pudding Mill Lane and Victoria Dock Portal will be constructed using Earth Pressure Balance Machines which will pass through ground which is predominantly London clay, sand and gravels.

The Slurry TBMs will be launched from Plumstead Portal in late 2012 and will tunnel westwards towards North Woolwich.

Construction of Plumstead Portal is now underway with work for North Woolwich Portal commencing in early 2012.

The first two Crossrail TBMs are currently being manufactured. Factory assembly of these TBMs begins in October and will complete during November.

The tunnel boring machines will then be factory tested before being dis-assembled in readiness for shipping to London.

The first TBM components will begin arriving in the UK at Tilbury Docks in December with the second TBM arriving later in January. The TBM components will be transported to Westbourne Park for re-assembly.

Herrenknecht AG will also deliver two TBMs to Limmo Peninsula for the eastern running tunnels in mid 2012, two machines to Stepney Green and two machines to Plumstead later in 2012. The TBMs required for Crossrail will be up to 120m in length and weigh around 850 tonnes.

Andy Mitchell, Crossrail Programme Director said:

“Work to manufacture the components for the first two Crossrail tunnel boring machines TBMs will shortly complete allowing the assembly process to begin.

“The TBMs will be fully assembled and tested at the factory over the next couple of months before being dis-assembled and transported to the UK ahead of tunnelling commencing at Royal Oak in spring 2012.

“A total of eight TBMs will be constructed for Crossrail with the remaining TBMs delivered to London throughout 2012.”

As the TBMs advance forward, precast concrete segments will be built in rings behind the TBMs.

Concrete segments for the western running tunnels between Royal Oak and Farringdon will be manufactured at Old Oak Common.

Work is now underway to construct the tunnel segment factory on railway land at Old Oak Common and on is track to be completed later this year.

When operational, the facility will contain 216 moulds for the 75,000 concrete segments needed to line Crossrail’s western running tunnels.

Approximately 50 people will be employed on-site and it will churn out over 200 segments per day at peak.

The factory is being built specifically for the production of Crossrail tunnel segments and once tunnelling is complete, it will be removed.

Crossrail is currently finalising arrangements with the tunnelling contractors regarding the location of the other concrete segment manufacturing sites.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
The remaining two tunnel boring machines (TBMs) required to construct Crossrail will be manufactured by Herrenknecht AG, Germany.

The final two TBMs will dig Crossrail’s Thames Tunnel in south-east London.

Once complete, Crossrail will dramatically cut journey times for travellers in south east London.

From Abbey Wood, Crossrail will reach Canary Wharf in 11 minutes, Liverpool Street in 17 minutes, Tottenham Court Road in 23 minutes and Heathrow in just 51 minutes.

To construct the 21km of twin-bored tunnel required for Crossrail, eight tunnel boring machines will be required and will undertake ten individual tunnel drives to construct the 6m diameter rail tunnels. The first two TBMs will launch from Royal Oak in spring 2012.

Earlier this year, Herrenknecht AG was selected by the major tunnelling contractors to build the first six tunnel boring machines for Crossrail.

Construction of the Thames Tunnel is being undertaken by a Joint Venture comprising Hochtief Construction AG and J Murphy & Sons Ltd who have selected Herrenknecht AG to construct the remaining two TBMs. There are no UK-based tunnel boring machine manufacturers.

Slurry TBMs will be used to construct the 2.6km twin bore Thames Tunnel due to the chalk ground conditions in this part of the capital.

The remainder of the tunnels, between Royal Oak, Pudding Mill Lane and Victoria Dock Portal will be constructed using Earth Pressure Balance Machines which will pass through ground which is predominantly London clay, sand and gravels.

The Slurry TBMs will be launched from Plumstead Portal in late 2012 and will tunnel westwards towards North Woolwich.

Construction of Plumstead Portal is now underway with work for North Woolwich Portal commencing in early 2012.

The first two Crossrail TBMs are currently being manufactured. Factory assembly of these TBMs begins in October and will complete during November.

The tunnel boring machines will then be factory tested before being dis-assembled in readiness for shipping to London.

The first TBM components will begin arriving in the UK at Tilbury Docks in December with the second TBM arriving later in January. The TBM components will be transported to Westbourne Park for re-assembly.

Herrenknecht AG will also deliver two TBMs to Limmo Peninsula for the eastern running tunnels in mid 2012, two machines to Stepney Green and two machines to Plumstead later in 2012. The TBMs required for Crossrail will be up to 120m in length and weigh around 850 tonnes.

Andy Mitchell, Crossrail Programme Director said:

“Work to manufacture the components for the first two Crossrail tunnel boring machines TBMs will shortly complete allowing the assembly process to begin.

“The TBMs will be fully assembled and tested at the factory over the next couple of months before being dis-assembled and transported to the UK ahead of tunnelling commencing at Royal Oak in spring 2012.

“A total of eight TBMs will be constructed for Crossrail with the remaining TBMs delivered to London throughout 2012.”

As the TBMs advance forward, precast concrete segments will be built in rings behind the TBMs.

Concrete segments for the western running tunnels between Royal Oak and Farringdon will be manufactured at Old Oak Common.

Work is now underway to construct the tunnel segment factory on railway land at Old Oak Common and on is track to be completed later this year.

When operational, the facility will contain 216 moulds for the 75,000 concrete segments needed to line Crossrail’s western running tunnels.

Approximately 50 people will be employed on-site and it will churn out over 200 segments per day at peak.

The factory is being built specifically for the production of Crossrail tunnel segments and once tunnelling is complete, it will be removed.

Crossrail is currently finalising arrangements with the tunnelling contractors regarding the location of the other concrete segment manufacturing sites.
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
The £13m Tunnelling and Underground Construction Academy (TUCA) has welcomed its first students.

The first training courses to be offered at the Academy include the Tunnel Safety Card, pre-requisite for anyone who will work below ground on Crossrail, and Construction Skills Certification Scheme health and safety card training.

Vocational courses initially on offer are pre-cast concrete manufacture and tunnel operations training.

Between now and the end of the year, a variety of other vocational training courses will begin to be offered, increasing the number of students attending the new campus.

Work to install tunnelling plant and machinery in the major vocational training areas, including a static tunnel boring machine and a simulated tunnel environment, will complete by the end of the year.

This will allow students to gain experience in the practical skills required for underground construction.

By early 2012, the Academy will be fully open for business with the full curriculum in delivery and the vocational training areas operational. Up to 150 students will be attending courses offered through the Academy at any one time.

Located at Ilford in east London, TUCA aims to address the shortage of people with the necessary skills to work on Crossrail and other tunnelling projects in London and the UK. It also has the potential to assist European projects.

The Tunnelling and Underground Construction Academy will offer training to at least 3,500 people over the lifetime of the Crossrail project alone. The only other dedicated tunnelling training facility in Europe is located in Switzerland.

Rail Minister Theresa Villiers said: “Investing in this Academy further emphasises Government’s commitment to rebalancing our economy and promoting the skills our young people need to help Britain compete in the world.

“This Academy’s legacy will be a new generation of specialists able to help deliver important infrastructure projects to support growth here and anywhere across the globe.”

Terry Morgan, Crossrail Chairman said: “Crossrail is gearing up for the start of tunnelling next spring and we have now commenced specialist training for the first of many thousands who will work on the project.

“The Tunnelling and Underground Construction Academy will have a critical role to play in equipping people, particularly those from along the Crossrail route, with the necessary training and skills to work below ground.

“The Academy will not only act as a centre of excellence for tunnelling and underground construction in the UK but also for European tunnelling projects longer-term.”

TUCA students will be made up of new entrants to the industry as well as Crossrail’s contractors’ existing workforces. Those already working in the industry can up-skill or formalise their knowledge through nationally accredited technical and safety training including apprenticeships, NVQs and other programmes.

TUCA is a large structure, approximately 100 metres long, 36 metres wide and 12 metres high. The total size of the Academy extends to 3,600 sq. metres.

Facilities will replicate the key areas of a fully-automated tunnelling project. These will include a simulated tunnel boring machine environment, supported by a TBM backup area, with a loco and narrow gauge railway to the rear.

There will be a separate chamber for Sprayed Concrete operations in addition to a large underground construction workshop. TUCA will also have four teaching rooms, a test centre for online safety tests, a large refectory and a Learning Resource Centre.

National Construction College (NCC) has been appointed to deliver skills and training at the Academy. NCC will complete the development of the curriculum and deliver the Academy’s full range of accredited and bespoke skills programmes.

An Industry Advisory Panel, comprising representatives from client and contractor organisations involved in underground construction, will ensure the training on offer at TUCA is world-class and responsive to the needs of industry. The Panel will include representatives of Thames Water and National Grid.

Crossrail also announced that a further sponsorship deal has been agreed for the Tunnelling and Underground Construction Academy. BASF Meyco Equipment will donate plant and construction supplies worth £600,000.

BASF Meyco Equipment joins National Grid, Interocean Personnel Services and New Civil Engineer magazine who have already signed-up to support the Academy. Further sponsorship deals are currently being finalised with the construction industry including key Crossrail suppliers.

In addition to the Tunnelling and Underground Construction Academy, Crossrail has committed to delivering at least 400 apprentices through its supply chain over the lifetime of the project.

The first 20 apprentices are now employed on Crossrail and this number will increase as intensive station construction and tunnelling gets underway.

Crossrail is also working with Jobcentre Plus (JCP) to provide local people with opportunities to work on the Crossrail project. Jobcentre Plus works with a network of local job brokerage and outreach agencies to match vacancies to suitable candidates and arrange interviews for short-listed applicants.

Contractors are obliged to send all employment opportunities to the job brokerage service 48 hours before they advertise them elsewhere. This gives the team an early opportunity to put forward job-ready candidates from the local area.
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Our friends over at London Reconnections spotted this intriguing video last week. Produced by Hammersmith & Fulham council, it’s a vision of how Old Oak Common could be redeveloped.

A mostly-forgotten scrub of industrial land and railway depots at the moment, Old Oak Common, near Harlseden, could undergo a huge redevelopment should HS2 go ahead. A new transport interchange linking the high-speed line with National Rail, Crossrail, London Overground and the Tube would be the catalyst for a major above-ground building project, likened by those backing it as on the scale of Canary Wharf or Stratford, and bringing in tens of thousands of jobs and new homes. Sir Terry Farrell’s on hand to masterplan the whole thing, which has been christened Park Royal City.

All well and good, and the video has lots of inspiring, visionary stuff (we’re intrigued by the “Jobs Express Light Railway”, though we’re not sure if this is named in reference to the employment opportunities its construction would afford or in honour of the late Apple CEO).

However, what lifts this video above others of its ilk is the decision to use, by way of soundtrack, a re-worked version of Starship’s “We Built This City” (once voted the worst song of the 1980s by Rolling Stone readers), with the refrain in the chorus switched from “rock and roll” to the eminently more sensible “rails and road”. It really has to be heard to be believed. Don’t blame us if you’re humming it for the rest of the day.

Some more constructive thoughts over at London Reconnections.

For Video

http://londonist.com/2011/10/video-the-future-transport-hub-at-old-oak-common.php
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Major planning applications submitted for Tottenham Court Road station
First new West End theatre in over a decade at former Astoria site
New 500,000 sq ft high-quality retail, office and residential spaces will boost regeneration of Oxford Street
Crossrail today submitted ambitious plans to Westminster City Council for the regeneration of Tottenham Court Road and the east end of Oxford Street, including the former Astoria site.
The plans, submitted in conjunction with Derwent London, propose two above ground developments located over each ticket hall of the integrated Tottenham Court Road station that will serve both Crossrail and London Underground passengers.

The 500,000 sq ft of premium retail, office and residential accommodation will cover four blocks, boosting the economy in the eastern end of Oxford Street and Tottenham Court Road. It will also deliver a significant contribution towards the Crossrail funding package.

A new theatre to replace the former Astoria Theatre is proposed. Derwent London has entered into an agreement with Nimax who will operate a new 350 seat theatre.

London Underground and Crossrail have also proposed detailed plans to renew and upgrade the public spaces around the eastern ticket hall and St Giles area.

A new open pedestrian space linking Soho Square and Charing Cross Road will create new views of the Square and of St. Patrick’s Church.

The Mayor of London, Boris Johnson said: "The east end of Oxford Street has long deserved the economic boost, improved public space and glamour these plans will deliver. It will be a gleaming example of the opportunities that will follow the route of this new line, as well as offering the facility to zoom from one side of London to the other at record speed."

Ian Lindsay, Crossrail Land and Property Director said: “These development plans will enhance Oxford Street and Charing Cross Road as a thriving cultural and retail destination. The quality of the new commercial space created will help attract major retailers to the eastern end of Oxford Street and boost the wider regeneration of the area.

“Crossrail will be submitting further above ground development planning applications for other station sites in central London over the coming months including at Bond Street and Farringdon. This will help us to make the most of the development and regeneration opportunities Crossrail is bringing to London.”

The proposals link into wider efforts by London Underground, Crossrail, Transport for London (TfL), Camden Council, Westminster City Council and Design for London to improve the area around St Giles Circus. A new public piazza will also be created providing a distinctive new landmark for the West End.

The arrival of Crossrail will make Tottenham Court Road a major West End transport hub. 150,000 passengers use Tottenham Court Road station every day. That number is expected to rise to more than 200,000 when Crossrail services commence in 2018. Crossrail will link the West End to Canary Wharf in 12 minutes, Stratford in 13 minutes and Heathrow in less than 30 minutes.

In total, £1bn is being spent to build the new Crossrail station and upgrade the capacity of the Tube station.

The private sector-funded over-site developments will be built once work to construct Tottenham Court Road station is complete in 2017. Crossrail will commence services in 2018.
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Crossrail today submitted ambitious plans to Westminster City Council for the regeneration of Tottenham Court Road and the east end of Oxford Street, including the former Astoria site.

The plans, submitted in conjunction with Derwent London, propose two above ground developments located over each ticket hall of the integrated Tottenham Court Road station that will serve both Crossrail and London Underground passengers.

The 500,000 sq ft of premium retail, office and residential accommodation will cover four blocks, boosting the economy in the eastern end of Oxford Street and Tottenham Court Road. It will also deliver a significant contribution towards the Crossrail funding package.

A new theatre to replace the former Astoria Theatre is proposed. Derwent London has entered into an agreement with Nimax who will operate a new 350 seat theatre.

London Underground and Crossrail have also proposed detailed plans to renew and upgrade the public spaces around the eastern ticket hall and St Giles area.

A new open pedestrian space linking Soho Square and Charing Cross Road will create new views of the Square and of St. Patrick’s Church.

The Mayor of London, Boris Johnson said: “The east end of Oxford Street has long deserved the economic boost, improved public space and glamour these plans will deliver. It will be a gleaming example of the opportunities that will follow the route of this new line, as well as offering the facility to zoom from one side of London to the other at record speed.”

Ian Lindsay, Crossrail Land and Property Director said: “These development plans will enhance Oxford Street and Charing Cross Road as a thriving cultural and retail destination. The quality of the new commercial space created will help attract major retailers to the eastern end of Oxford Street and boost the wider regeneration of the area.

“Crossrail will be submitting further above ground development planning applications for other station sites in central London over the coming months including at Bond Street and Farringdon. This will help us to make the most of the development and regeneration opportunities Crossrail is bringing to London.”

The proposals link into wider efforts by London Underground, Crossrail, Transport for London (TfL), Camden Council, Westminster City Council and Design for London to improve the area around St Giles Circus. A new public piazza will also be created providing a distinctive new landmark for the West End.

The arrival of Crossrail will make Tottenham Court Road a major West End transport hub. 150,000 passengers use Tottenham Court Road station every day. That number is expected to rise to more than 200,000 when Crossrail services commence in 2018. Crossrail will link the West End to Canary Wharf in 12 minutes, Stratford in 13 minutes and Heathrow in less than 30 minutes.

In total, £1bn is being spent to build the new Crossrail station and upgrade the capacity of the Tube station.

The private sector-funded over-site developments will be built once work to construct Tottenham Court Road station is complete in 2017. Crossrail will commence services in 2018.
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Crossrail has submitted ambitious plans to Westminster City Council for the regeneration of Tottenham Court Road and the east end of Oxford Street, including the former Astoria site.

The plans, submitted in conjunction with Derwent London, propose two above ground developments located over each ticket hall of the integrated Tottenham Court Road station that will serve both Crossrail and London Underground passengers.

The 500,000 sq ft of premium retail, office and residential accommodation will cover four blocks, boosting the economy in the eastern end of Oxford Street and Tottenham Court Road.

It will also deliver a significant contribution towards the Crossrail funding package.

A new theatre to replace the former Astoria Theatre is proposed. Derwent London has entered into an agreement with Nimax who will operate a new 350 seat theatre.

London Underground and Crossrail have also proposed detailed plans to renew and upgrade the public spaces around the eastern ticket hall and St Giles area.

A new open pedestrian space linking Soho Square and Charing Cross Road will create new views of the Square and of St. Patrick’s Church.

The Mayor of London, Boris Johnson said:

“The east end of Oxford Street has long deserved the economic boost, improved public space and glamour these plans will deliver.

“It will be a gleaming example of the opportunities that will follow the route of this new line, as well as offering the facility to zoom from one side of London to the other at record speed.”

Ian Lindsay, Crossrail Land and Property Director said:

“These development plans will enhance Oxford Street and Charing Cross Road as a thriving cultural and retail destination.

“The quality of the new commercial space created will help attract major retailers to the eastern end of Oxford Street and boost the wider regeneration of the area.

“Crossrail will be submitting further above ground development planning applications for other station sites in central London over the coming months including at Bond Street and Farringdon.

“This will help us to make the most of the development and regeneration opportunities Crossrail is bringing to London.”

The proposals link into wider efforts by London Underground, Crossrail, Transport for London (TfL), Camden Council, Westminster City Council and Design for London to improve the area around St Giles Circus.

A new public piazza will also be created providing a distinctive new landmark for the West End.

The arrival of Crossrail will make Tottenham Court Road a ‘major West End transport hub’. 150,000 passengers use Tottenham Court Road station every day.

That number is expected to rise to more than 200,000 when Crossrail services commence in 2018.

Crossrail will link the West End to Canary Wharf in 12 minutes, Stratford in 13 minutes and Heathrow in less than 30 minutes.

In total, £1bn is being spent to build the new Crossrail station and upgrade the capacity of the Tube station.

The private sector-funded over-site developments will be built once work to construct Tottenham Court Road station is complete in 2017. Crossrail will commence services in 2018
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Progress as observed thursday 20th Oct.

Paddington. New steel frame has been installed over the Hammersmith and city line platforms for the new ticket hall, however little changed out on Eastbourne terrace where the crossrail platforms will be built with service diversion work still underway.

Plumstead Portal. With site set up now complete the entire site is being covered in hardcore to build a working platform for the heavy machinery which will soon be on site.
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
The lymo peninsular tunneling site (adjacent to canning town station) has now been established. Work is now progressing rapidly to prpare for the arrival of the first tunneling machine in around 6 months time. There is less work here than at the other tunnel portals as there are no existing services to be moved before work can begin.
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Crossrail is seeking bids for the development of Custom House station, the only above ground station within the central section of London's biggest railway construction project.

The company announced today that a contract notice has been placed in the Official Journal of the European Union seeking expressions of interest for the construction of Custom House station, the value of which is in the region of £35m.

The new station, which is located within the regenerated Royal Docks area, will improve links between central London and the ExCeL Exhibition Centre, allowing passengers to reach Canary Wharf in four minutes, Bond Street in 17 minutes and Heathrow Airport in less than 45 minutes.

The new Crossrail station, designed by architects Allies and Morrison, will be built on the site of the former North London Line station that closed in December 2006.

As part of the development the station will include a new ticket hall, interchange with Docklands Light Railway (DLR) and step-free access between the street and Crossrail platforms.

The tender documents for Custom House station are expected to be issued in early 2012 with the contract awarded late next year.

Construction will begin in early 2013 with the station completed in 2018.

Crossrail will run 118km from Maidenhead and Heathrow in the west, through new twin-bore 21km tunnels under central London to Shenfield and Abbey Wood.

Once completed, the line is expected to shorten the commute to London to within 45 minutes for an additional 1.5 million people
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Crossrail has announced that a contract notice has been placed in the Official Journal of the European Union seeking expressions of interest for Custom House station.

The indicative value of the main construction contract is in the region of £35 million.

The new Crossrail Custom House station, located in east London, is the only above ground station within Crossrail’s central section.

The new station will not only assist with the continued regeneration of the Royal Docks but also improve links between central London and the ExCeL Exhibition Centre.

When Crossrail opens, passengers will be able to reach Canary Wharf in 4 minutes, Bond Street in 17 minutes and Heathrow Airport in less than 45 minutes.

The new Crossrail station will be built on the site of the former North London Line station which closed to passengers in December 2006.

The new station will include a new ticket hall, interchange with Docklands Light Railway (DLR) and step-free access between the street and Crossrail platforms.

The tender documents for Custom House station will be issued in early 2012 with the contract awarded late next year.

Construction will begin in early 2013 with the station completed in 2018
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Crossrail is seeking bids for the development of Custom House station, the only above ground station within the central section of London's biggest railway construction project.

The company announced today that a contract notice has been placed in the Official Journal of the European Union seeking expressions of interest for the construction of Custom House station, the value of which is in the region of £35m.

The new station, which is located within the regenerated Royal Docks area, will improve links between central London and the ExCeL Exhibition Centre, allowing passengers to reach Canary Wharf in four minutes, Bond Street in 17 minutes and Heathrow Airport in less than 45 minutes.

The new Crossrail station, designed by architects Allies and Morrison, will be built on the site of the former North London Line station that closed in December 2006.

As part of the development the station will include a new ticket hall, interchange with Docklands Light Railway (DLR) and step-free access between the street and Crossrail platforms.

The tender documents for Custom House station are expected to be issued in early 2012 with the contract awarded late next year.

Construction will begin in early 2013 with the station completed in 2018.

Crossrail will run 118km from Maidenhead and Heathrow in the west, through new twin-bore 21km tunnels under central London to Shenfield and Abbey Wood.

Once completed, the line is expected to shorten the commute to London to within 45 minutes for an additional 1.5 million people.
 

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