Roof covering

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wally-wowser1 Junior Train Controller

Location: overlooking the Mt vic washaway on Soldiers Pinch

Trying to find out  what was used as covering on  roof's of  various pass cars & what was used to waterproof  them . Nonething too technical please  as I will have to then  translate  to german  for a  forum  over there  . Also  any idea  where I may  find  Pic's of  said roof's.

Thanks in advance

Wally

 
42101 Banned

Location: Banned

Canvas with a type of waterproofing membrain often times a tar type of stuff from memory.

 
R38 Banned

Location: Banned

That must be the 100% correct answer, he drilled it into you three times  WinkLaughing

 
a6et Minister for Railways

Malthoid

 
tezza Deputy Commissioner

Malthoid

- a6et

     Malthoid glued on with bituminous paint , then covered with a reflective silver paint...

      The canvas on the ends and over end platforms were glued and painted with navy dressing.

 

Location: Exit...Stage Left!

Envelon in Victoria. It was painted with a special paint too I believe.

I believe both Emerclad (spelling?), and glass fibre has been used in preservation.

 
warienga Chief Train Controller

Location: Perth

In WA, canvas  - stuck to the roof with thickened oil based paint, then painted with oil based undercoat and then oil based topcoat. In preservation we have changed the topcoat to multiple layers of acrylic gloss and have roofs going strong after 25 years.

Later WAGR practice saw malthoid introduced, with the same methods of adhesion as described above.

 
42101 Banned

Location: Banned

That must be the 100% correct answer, he drilled it into you three times  WinkLaughing

- R38

Nah was just RP being a right pain at 0620 this morning mate....grrr...fixed now.

 
VRfan - Moderator Moderator

Location: In front of my computer :-p

When restoring 63RM a few years ago, we painted the timber in several thick coats of weathershield, then covered the roof in canvas before yet more coats of weathersheild paint.

The first coat on the canvas was watered down so it would soak through the canvas, second coat was 50/50 water/paint and then the final coats were paint.

 
sthyer Deputy Commissioner

At Steamrail in Victoria, a new roof was done with canvas. There is a particular grade of canvas that is used, it's not the same as the canvas used for shade awnings or tents, it's a lot thicker and coarser. It was possibly called Jute, I'm not sure what the differences are.

The canvas was glued down with contact adhesive, then a waterproof membrane called 'Envelon' http://www.dominionplas.com.au/envelon.htm was used, I assume it was Envelon 452. At least 2 costs were applied and this wold soak into the canvas. Be warned, its solvent is fairly potent, in this day and age read the MSDS.

After that, the topcoat was enamel based paint with added linseed oil, don't know the percentage of oil added. Topcoats were applied on an annual basis to keep the canvas nourished with oil.

It's been quite a few years since I've done a roof, don't know what the process is these days. Envelon is an Australian product, you may be looking for a German supplier of a similar product. Over the years there have been many alternative suppliers of products claimed to be up to the task, but the roof of a wooden bodied vehicle has to put up with flexing, wet weather and in Australia, a lot of UV exposure. All these take their toll on a roof, not all products have proved themselves over time.

A shed is the best roof covering of all ExclamationExclamationExclamationExclamation

 
PE Chief Train Controller

The standard Victorian Railways wooden roof covering was 16 ounce canvas. This is what was purchased and used on 63RM and had been so for eventual use on 53RM.

sthyers description of how the VR did their roofs is pretty spot on, the difference being that instead of using adhesive they attached the canvas to the roof using copper tacks. Prior to the advancements on polymer sealant such as envelon the VR used white lead to seal the canvas.

This wasn’t the first use of such products (envelon) as in the late 50s/early 60s they were using a type of liquid rubber sealant called CRC that was painted directly onto the canvas and was a grey colour. It however suffered (as alluded to in sthyers post) to UV exposure and why often in photos of that period is faded to an almost white colour.

For photos, if you go to http://www.dscr.com.au, the enthusiast menu and then select overhaul of 63RM page 2 has a series of photos of canvassing the roof.

 
anzac1959 Chief Commissioner

Malthoid

- a6et

 
LowndesJ515 Chief Commissioner

Location: Goulburn

At Steamrail in Victoria, a new roof was done with canvas. There is a particular grade of canvas that is used, it's not the same as the canvas used for shade awnings or tents, it's a lot thicker and coarser. It was possibly called Jute, I'm not sure what the differences are.

The canvas was glued down with contact adhesive, then a waterproof membrane called 'Envelon' http://www.dominionplas.com.au/envelon.htm was used, I assume it was Envelon 452. At least 2 costs were applied and this wold soak into the canvas. Be warned, its solvent is fairly potent, in this day and age read the MSDS.

After that, the topcoat was enamel based paint with added linseed oil, don't know the percentage of oil added. Topcoats were applied on an annual basis to keep the canvas nourished with oil.

It's been quite a few years since I've done a roof, don't know what the process is these days. Envelon is an Australian product, you may be looking for a German supplier of a similar product. Over the years there have been many alternative suppliers of products claimed to be up to the task, but the roof of a wooden bodied vehicle has to put up with flexing, wet weather and in Australia, a lot of UV exposure. All these take their toll on a roof, not all products have proved themselves over time.

A shed is the best roof covering of all ExclamationExclamationExclamationExclamation

- sthyer

Agree with the roof mention!!!

Steamrail now using Emuclad for the roof.

 
The Man in Blue Deputy Commissioner

Location: Trackside in Baiyin NW China!

Canvas with a type of waterproofing membrain often times a tar type of stuff from memory.

- 42101

The "type of waterproofing" was called Navy Dressing, a linseed oil based product light brown in colour. Roofs varied, TAM 934 had an all canvass/navy dressing roof. Other cars had malthoid (tar paper) sheet stuck down with bitumen, coated with aluminium (silver) paint along the body of the car with the canopy ends only being canvas/navy dressing. In the final years of wooden car overhauls, fibreglass was used on the canopy ends.

The "trick" to using fibreglass on car roofs, is to put alfoil under it so it doesn't stick to the boards, allowing flexing. Roof vents and aluminium edging keep the fibreglass in place. One group years ago did a fibreglass roof, bonded it to the boards, but as soon as the car moved, the whole thing cracked.

 

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