Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
SINGAPORE /PRNewswire/ -- Boeing (NYSE: BA) and Jakarta-based Lion Air today finalized a firm order for 201 737 MAXs and 29 Next-Generation 737-900ERs (extended range). The agreement, first announced last November in Indonesia, also includes purchase rights for an additional 150 airplanes.
"The 737 MAX is the best choice for Lion Air and the best airplane to serve our passengers," said Rusdi Kirana, Lion Air Founder and President Director. "We're excited to be the first airline in Asia to fly the 737 MAX and to be the global launch customer of the 737 MAX 9."
With orders for 230 airplanes valued at $22.4 billion at list prices, this deal is the largest commercial airplane order ever in Boeing's history by both dollar value and total number of airplanes. Lion Air will also acquire purchase rights for an additional 150 airplanes.
"Lion Air has been a leader in Indonesia from the very beginning," said Dinesh Keskar, vice president of Asia-Pacific and India Sales for Boeing Commercial Airplanes. "Today more people are flying in Asia at lower fares because of the 737 and this historic 737 MAX order will help connect more people in the future."
The 737 MAX is a new engine variant of the world's best selling airplane and builds on the strengths of today's Next-Generation 737. The 737 MAX incorporates the latest-technology CFM International LEAP-1B engines to deliver the highest efficiency, reliability and passenger comfort in the single-aisle market.
Airlines operating the 737 MAX will see a 10-12 percent fuel burn improvement over today's most fuel efficient single-aisle airplanes and a 7 percent operating cost per seat advantage over tomorrow's competition.
To date, the 737 MAX has orders and commitments for more than 1,000 airplanes from 15 customers and the Next-Generation 737 family has won orders for more than 6,600 airplanes.
Lion Air, Indonesia's largest private airline, currently operates or has on order a total of 178 Next-Generation 737s.
Source: Boeing

Sponsored advertisement

  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
SEATTLE /PRNewswire/ -- Boeing (NYSE: BA) has announced that Singapore Airlines will be the launch customer for Boeing's new Electronic Logbook (ELB) software. The new version of ELB, developed in partnership with Ultramain Systems, Inc., enables unprecedented levels of communication between pilots, ground crews, maintenance crews and engineering.
Singapore Airlines will be deploying ELB on all their Boeing 777 airplanes.
ELB runs on an airplane's Electronic Flight Bag to connect flight data with ground-based technicians and equipment. The application feeds flight crew data into a central repository where it is combined with maintenance and engineering information. This allows airlines to better understand and diagnose issues within the context of multiple airplane systems.
"ELB allows us to transform data into usable information that can give our customers' operations a competitive edge," said Per Noren, vice president of Boeing's Commercial Aviation Information Services. "Airplane information is efficiently and quickly shared with the people who need it, which facilitates fast turnaround times – and that translate into better passenger service and greater airline cost savings.
"Singapore Airlines consistently leads the industry in adopting technology to improve their quality, service and reliability. Their partnership throughout our development process helped realize important operational efficiency opportunities," Noren added.
With this investment, Singapore Airlines adds ELB to their existing Boeing digital efficiency solutions: Maintenance Performance Toolbox, Airplane Health Management (AHM) and Integrated Material Management (IMM) services. Combining these Boeing tools, integrated into Singapore's back office resource management systems, will enable even better passenger service and greater maintenance and operational efficiencies.
Source: Boeing
  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
EVERETT, Wash. – Boeing [NYSE: BA] has delivered a new 767-300ER (Extended Range) passenger airplane to Uzbekistan Airways, coinciding with the airline’s 20th anniversary.
 

This is the first of the four 767-300ERs ordered by the airline in 2008. Uzbekistan Airways, headquartered in Tashkent, also has two 787-8s on order.
 

“Air travel in and out of our region is increasing and the 767-300ER, with its excellent fuel efficiency and operational flexibility, will enable us to successfully meet the growing demand,” said Valeriy Tian, director-general, Uzbekistan Airways. “As we celebrate our 20th anniversary and implement our growth plans, we look forward to continuing our partnership with Boeing.”
 

The Boeing 767 family is a complete family of clean, quiet, fuel-efficient airplanes that provide maximum market versatility in the 200- to 300-seat market. Boeing has delivered more than 1,000 767s that are flown by over 120 operators around the world.
 

“We congratulate Uzbekistan Airways on their 20th year of successful operations and Boeing is proud to be a partner with this technically advanced and extremely well managed airline,” said Marty Bentrott, vice president of Sales for Middle East, Russia and Central Asia, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. “With the new, even more passenger-pleasing cabin interior, low operating costs and technological innovations, Boeing is confident that the 767-300ERs will play an important role as Uzbekistan Airways continues with its expansion plans.”
 

Source: Boeing
  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
INGAPORE – Earlier today, The Boeing Company made the following announcement regarding Lion Air finalizing its order for 201 LEAP-1B-powered Boeing 737 MAX 9 airplanes and 29 CFM56-7B-powered Next-Generation 737-900ER aircraft.
 

* The LEAP-1B engine order for the 201 737 MAX 9 is valued at approximately $4.8 billion U.S. at list price.
 

* The CFM56-7B engine order to power the 29 Next-Generation 73-900ERs is valued at $580 million U.S. at list price.
 

"We are obviously honored by the continued confidence Lion Air has shown in CFM with this history order. We have a great long-standing relationship with this airline and look forward to further strengthening that bond as we introduce the LEAP-1B into their fleet,” said CFM President and CEO Jean-Paul Ebanga.
 

“At the same time, our relationship with Boeinggoes back more than 30 years and the CFM-powered Boeing 737 program is the best-selling aircraft/engine combination in aviation history. The CFM-powered 737 aircraft being delivered today represents three decades of leading-edge technical innovation and we look forward to taking that technology to a whole new level with the LEAP-powered 737."
 

Source: CFM
  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
MUMBAI – GE Capital Aviation Services Limited (GECAS), the commercial aircraft leasing and financing arm of GE, today announced delivery of a leased Boeing 767-300ER to a new customer, MEGA Maldives Airlines to help with the young carrier's fleet expansion.
 

MEGA Maldives Airlines, which started operations in 2010, currently operates two aircraft on a scheduled and charter basis to Hong Kong and other cities in Asia from its base at Male’ International Airport on the island nation of Maldives.
 

Source: General Electric Company
  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
The JAL Group (JAL) has announced an order of twenty Boeing 787-9 aircraft, which it intends to deploy on medium to long haul international routes after fiscal year 2015, as part of its Mid-Term Management Plans for fiscal years 2012 to 2016. The twenty orders comprise ten new purchases and a conversion of ten of the 35 Boeing 787-8s it currently has on order.  
 

JAL's overall purchase of the Dreamliner now stands at 25 firm orders of the 787-8, and 20 of the 787-9, with 20 options, raising the initial order of 35 Dreamliners to 45.
 

The 787-9 is a slightly larger version that can fit approximately 50 more seats than the 787-8 configured for international routes. Equally efficient as the 787-8 but with more seat capacity, the unit cost per seat on the 787-9 is estimated to be lower and an improvement in line with JAL's efforts to bring down air operation expense per available seat kilometer to achieve the goal of saving 50 billion yen in cost effectiveness during the period of the Mid-Term Management Plan.
 

JAL intends to maximize the competitiveness of the super-efficient Dreamliner that offers many enhancements to passenger comfort, as JAL positions itself for growth by seizing business opportunities afforded by the upcoming expansion of slot capacity in the Tokyo metropolitan areas (Narita and Haneda).
 

Source: Japan Airlines
  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Seoul, Korea - Korean Air celebrated the delivery of the airline’s first B747-8 and B777 Freighters in Seoul Incheon today. With this milestone delivery, Korean Air becomes the first airline in the world to operate both the B747-8 and B777 Freighters.
“We are very proud to become the first airline in the world to have the combined strengths of these two freighters in its fleet,” said Yang Ho Cho, chairman of Korean Air. “Our cargo fleet is being improved by these fuel-saving planes as they help reduce carbon emissions by 17 percent which supports our goal to be a responsible citizen of the world.”
Korea’s flagship carrier is the first Boeing customer to order both variations of the new 747-8 airplane and is also a key supplier partner on this new airplane programme.
“Boeing is honoured to celebrate this historic delivery with YH Cho and the Korean Air family” said Jim Albaugh, president and CEO of Boeing Commercial Airplanes.  "It is hard to imagine reaching this day without the leadership of YH, and his vision to transform Korean Air into one of the best global airlines in the world."  
The 747-8 Freighter offers a range of 4,390 nautical miles (8,130 km) and a maximum structural payload capacity of 154 tons (140 tonnes), while offering an additional 4,221 cubic feet (120 m3) and 16 percent more revenue cargo volume than the 747-400 Freighter.
The twin-engine Boeing 777 Freighter is the most fuel-efficient airplane with leading economic and environmental performance in its category. It has a cargo capacity of 103 metric tons (113 tons) with a range of 9,038 kilometres (4,880 nautical miles).
Korean Air plans to operate the 747-8 Freighter on its transpacific route, with stops in Osaka and Narita, Japan, Los Angeles and San Francisco. The 777 Freighter is Korean Air’s first twin-engine freighter and will allow the airline to operate within new markets in Europe, including Vienna, Frankfurt and London.
Source: Korean Air
  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

Aircraft manufacturer, Boeing is reportedly working on a long-range replacement to its Boeing 777-200LR that could see the new aircraft fly Sydney to London direct.

Expected to enter service by 2020 and dubbed the 777-8XL, the aircraft is expected to have a mission range that is 85nm longer than the 777-200LR and would use up to 14 to 16 percent less fuel per seat, Flightglobal reported.

The reduction in fuel and its longer mission range would make the aircraft a viable option for airlines looking to fly direct between Sydney and London, without making a pit stop in Asia.

An insider told media that “Boeing continues to explore many options to build on the 777’s popularity” but declined to offer specific information regarding the make of the new aircraft.

However, the 777-8LX aircraft is expected to be powered with a General Electric GE9X that will offer a 99500lb thrust range. 

Meanwhile, this week the aircraft manufacturer launched a new initiative, Boeing Edge that would see the Group focus on gaining customer through the company’s commercial aviation services and support.


The Company’s senior vice president Lou Mancini explained the Boeing Edge described the advantage customer gain when they purchase a Boeing aircraft.

"No other company in the world has the breadth and depth of Boeing in terms of knowledge, innovation, commitment and services integration along with the passion of our global team," Mr Mancini said. 

"When customers come to Boeing, they're not just getting world-class support for their businesses, they're gaining a vital advantage over their competition.

“This advantage now has a name – the Boeing Edge."

  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

Singapore Airlines will mark its retirement of the Boeing 747 after nearly four decades of service with special commemorative flights between Singapore and Hong Kong on April 6. 
  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

 BOEING FORECASTS $1.5 TRILLION MARKET FOR NEW AIRPLANES IN ASIA PACIFIC

 

Singapore: Boeing says strong passenger growth will be one of the main drivers of new airplane demand in the Asia Pacific region. Boeing estimates the region’s airlines will need an additional 11,450 airplanes valued at $1.5 trillion over the next 20 years. “Asia Pacific is such a strong and dynamic market,” said Randy Tinseth, vice president of Marketing for Boeing Commercial Airplanes during a media briefing before the opening of the Singapore Airshow. “In 2012 we’ll continue to see   resilient passenger traffic growth levels above the forecasted world average.” As a result of the strong demand for air travel over the next 20 years, Tinseth said nearly 80% of Asia Pacific’s new airplanes will be for growth as opposed to replacement. Boeing’s data projects that passenger   airlines will rely primarily on single-aisle airplanes such as the Next-Generation 737 and the 737 MAX, a new-engine variant of the   market-leading 737, to connect passengers. “We’re making solid progress on the 737 MAX,” Tinseth told reporters. “We’ll   start wind tunnel testing next week, which is a major design milestone, and sales momentum continues with more than 1,000 orders and commitments from 15 customers.” For long-haul traffic, Boeing forecasts twin-aisle airplanes such as the 777, which had a record year of orders in 2011, and the 787 Dreamliner will account for 26% of new airplane deliveries. In the cargo market, Boeing sees a need for 970 new production freighters around the world during the next 20 years. Boeing Commercial Airplanes regional director of Cargo Marketing Jim Edgar said the long term prospects for air cargo remain solid despite flat 2011 results. “We expect positive   air cargo traffic growth to return in the latter half of 2012, leading into an average annual growth rate of 5.6% over the   20-year forecast period,” said Edgar. “Our forecast bodes well for the Asia Pacific region, which will continue to be a leader as   economic growth drives a tripling of traffic and a near doubling of the world freighter fleet over the next two decades.”

 

  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2011-1092; Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-111-AD;
Amendment 39-16946; AD 2012-03-05]
RIN 2120-AA64


Airworthiness Directives; Bombardier Inc., Airplanes

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of
Transportation (DOT).

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain
Bombardier, Inc. Model BD-700-1A10 and BD-700-1A11 airplanes. This AD
was prompted by a report of deformation at the neck of the pressure
regulator body on certain oxygen cylinder and regulator assemblies
(CRA). This AD requires an inspection to determine if a certain oxygen
CRA is installed and the replacement of oxygen CRAs containing pressure
regulators having a certain part number. We are issuing this AD to
prevent elongation of the pressure regulator neck, which could result
in rupture of the oxygen cylinder, and in the case of cabin
depressurization, oxygen not being available when required.

DATES: This AD becomes effective March 23, 2012.
   The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by
reference of certain publications listed in this AD as of March 23,
2012.

ADDRESSES: You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov or in person at the U.S. Department of
Transportation, Docket Operations, M-30, West Building Ground Floor,
Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Cesar Gomez, Aerospace Engineer,
Airframe and Mechanical Systems Branch, ANE-171, FAA, New York Aircraft
Certification Office, 1600 Stewart Avenue, Suite 410, Westbury, New
York 11590; telephone (516) 228-7318; fax (516) 794-5531.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Discussion

   We issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend 14 CFR
part 39 to include an AD that would apply to the specified products.
That NPRM was published in the Federal Register on October 26, 2011 (76
FR 66198). The MCAI states:

   During a routine inspection, deformation was found at the neck
of the pressure regulator body on the oxygen Cylinder and Regulator
Assemblies (CRA).
   An investigation by the vendor, Avox Systems Inc., revealed that
the deformation was attributed to two (2) batches of raw material
that did not meet the required tensile strength. This may cause
elongation of the pressure regulator neck, which could result in
rupture of the oxygen cylinder, and in the case of cabin
depressurization, oxygen not being available when required.
   This [Canadian] directive mandates [an inspection to determine
if a certain oxygen CRA is installed and] the replacement of oxygen
CRAs containing pressure regulators, part number (P/N) 806370-06,
that do not meet the required material properties.

   You may obtain further information by examining the MCAI in the AD
docket.

Comments

   We gave the public the opportunity to participate in developing
this AD. We received no comments on the NPRM (76 FR 66198, October 26,
2011), or on the determination of the cost to the public.

Conclusion

   We reviewed the available data and determined that air safety and
the public interest require adopting the AD as proposed except for
minor editorial changes. We have determined that these minor changes:
    Are consistent with the intent that was proposed in the
NPRM (76 FR 66198, October 26, 2011), for correcting the unsafe
condition; and
    Do not add any additional burden upon the public than was
already proposed in the NPRM (76 FR 66198, October 26, 2011).

Costs of Compliance

   We estimate that this AD will affect 39 products of U.S. registry.
We also estimate that it will take about 10 work-hours per product to
comply with the basic requirements of this AD. The average labor rate
is $85 per work-hour. Required parts will cost about $0 per product.
Where the service information lists required parts costs that are
covered under warranty, we have assumed that there will be no charge
for these parts. As we do not control warranty coverage for affected
parties, some parties may incur costs higher than estimated here. Based
on these figures, we estimate the cost of this AD to the U.S. operators
to be $33,150, or $850 per product.

Authority for This Rulemaking

   Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's authority to
issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the
authority of the FAA Administrator. ``Subtitle VII: Aviation
Programs,'' describes in more detail the scope of the Agency's
authority.
   We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in
``Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701: General
requirements.'' Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with
promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing
regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator
finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within
the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition
that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this
rulemaking action.

Regulatory Findings

   We determined that this AD will not have federalism implications
under Executive Order 13132. This AD will not have a substantial direct
effect on the States, on the relationship between the national
government and the States, or on the distribution of power and
responsibilities among the various levels of government.
   For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD:
   1. Is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under Executive Order
12866;
   2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies
and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979);
   3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska; and
   4. Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or
negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria
of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.
   We prepared a regulatory evaluation of the estimated costs to
comply with this AD and placed it in the AD docket.

[[Page 9521]]

Examining the AD Docket

   You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov; or in person at the Docket Operations office
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal
holidays. The AD docket contains the NPRM (76 FR 66198, October 26,
2011), the regulatory evaluation, any comments received, and other
information. The street address for the Docket Operations office
(telephone (800) 647-5527) is in the ADDRESSES section. Comments will
be available in the AD docket shortly after receipt.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39

   Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by
reference, Safety.

Adoption of the Amendment

   Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the
Administrator, the FAA amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows:

PART 39--AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES

0
1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows:

   Authority:  49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701.


Sec.  39.13  [Amended]

0
2. The FAA amends Sec.  39.13 by adding the following new AD:

2012-03-05 Bombardier, Inc.: Amendment 39-16946. Docket No. FAA-
2011-1092; Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-111-AD.

(a) Effective Date

   This airworthiness directive (AD) becomes effective March 23,
2012.

(b) Affected ADs

   None.

(c) Applicability

   This AD applies to Bombardier, Inc. Model BD-700-1A10 and BD-
700-1A11 airplanes, certificated in any category, serial numbers (S/
N) 9002 through 9126 inclusive, 9128 through 9312 inclusive, 9314
through 9322 inclusive, 9324 through 9335 inclusive, 9337, 9338,
9340, 9341, 9343, 9344, 9346, 9347, 9350, 9353, 9355, 9356, 9358,
9361, 9365, 9372, 9374, 9384, 9402, 9403, and subsequent.

(d) Subject

   Air Transport Association (ATA) of America Code 35: Oxygen.

(e) Reason

   This AD was prompted by a report of deformation at the neck of
the pressure regulator body on certain oxygen cylinder and regulator
assemblies (CRA). We are issuing this AD to prevent elongation of
the pressure regulator neck, which could result in rupture of the
oxygen cylinder, and in the case of cabin depressurization, oxygen
not being available when required.

(f) Compliance

   You are responsible for having the actions required by this AD
performed within the compliance times specified, unless the actions
have already been done.

(g) Actions

   For airplanes having S/N 9002 through 9126 inclusive, 9128
through 9312 inclusive, 9314 through 9322 inclusive, 9324 through
9335 inclusive, 9337, 9338, 9340, 9341, 9343, 9344, 9346, 9347,
9350, 9353, 9355, 9356, 9358, 9361, 9365, 9372, 9374, 9384, 9402,
and 9403: Within 7 months after the effective date of this AD, do an
inspection of oxygen pressure regulators having P/N 806370-06 to
determine if the serial number is listed in Table 2 of the
Accomplishment Instructions of Bombardier Service Bulletin 700-35-
011 (for Model BD-700-1A10 airplanes) or 700-1A11-35-010 (for Model
BD-700-1A11 airplanes), both Revision 01, both dated February 1,
2011.
   (1) If the serial number of the pressure regulator having P/N
806370-06 is listed in Table 2 of the Accomplishment Instructions of
Bombardier Service Bulletin 700-35-011 (for Model BD-700-1A10
airplanes) or 700-1A11-35-010 (for Model BD-700-1A11 airplanes),
both Revision 01, both dated February 1, 2011: Within 7 months after
the effective date of this AD, replace the affected oxygen CRA, in
accordance with paragraph 2.C. of the Accomplishment Instructions of
Bombardier Service Bulletin 700-35-011 (for Model BD-700-1A10
airplanes) or 700-1A11-35-010 (for Model BD-700-1A11 airplanes),
both Revision 01, both dated February 1, 2011.
   (2) If the serial number of the oxygen pressure regulator having
P/N 806370-06 is not listed in Table 2 of the Accomplishment
Instructions of Bombardier Service Bulletin 700-35-011 (for Model
BD-700-1A10 airplanes) or 700-1A11-35-010 (for Model BD-700-1A11
airplanes), both Revision 01, both dated February 1, 2011: No
further action is required by this paragraph.

(h) Parts Installation

   For all airplanes: As of the effective date of this AD, no
person may install an oxygen pressure regulator (P/N 806370-06)
having any serial number listed in Table 2 of the Accomplishment
Instructions of Bombardier Service Bulletin 700-35-011 (for Model
BD-700-1A10 airplanes) or 700-1A11-35-010 (for Model BD-700-1A11
airplanes), both Revision 01, both dated February 1, 2011, on any
airplane, unless a suffix ``-A'' is beside the serial number.

(i) Other FAA AD Provisions

   The following provisions also apply to this AD:
   (1) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs): The Manager, New
York Aircraft Certification Office (ACO), ANE-170, FAA, has the
authority to approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested using the
procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. In accordance with 14 CFR 39.19,
send your request to your principal inspector or local Flight
Standards District Office, as appropriate. If sending information
directly to the ACO, send it to ATTN: Program Manager, Continuing
Operational Safety, FAA, New York ACO, 1600 Stewart Avenue, Suite
410, Westbury, New York 11590; telephone 516-228-7300; fax 516-794-
5531. Before using any approved AMOC, notify your appropriate
principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager
of the local flight standards district office/certificate holding
district office. The AMOC approval letter must specifically
reference this AD.
   (2) Airworthy Product: For any requirement in this AD to obtain
corrective actions from a manufacturer or other source, use these
actions if they are FAA-approved. Corrective actions are considered
FAA-approved if they are approved by the State of Design Authority
(or their delegated agent). You are required to assure the product
is airworthy before it is returned to service.

(j) Related Information

   Refer to MCAI Canadian Airworthiness Directive CF-2011-10, dated
May 13, 2011, and the service bulletins specified in paragraphs
(j)(1) and (j)(2) of this AD, for related information.
   (1) Bombardier Service Bulletin 700-35-011, Revision 01, dated
February 1, 2011.
   (2) Bombardier Service Bulletin 700-1A11-35-010, Revision 01,
dated February 1, 2011.

(k) Material Incorporated by Reference

   (1) You must use the following service information to do the
actions required by this AD, unless the AD specifies otherwise. The
Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by
reference (IBR) of the following service information under 5 U.S.C.
552(a) and 1 CFR part 51:
   (i) Bombardier Service Bulletin 700-35-011, Revision 01, dated
February 1, 2011.
   (ii) Bombardier Service Bulletin 700-1A11-35-010, Revision 01,
dated February 1, 2011.
   (2) For service information identified in this AD, contact
Bombardier, Inc., 400 C[ocirc]te-Vertu Road West, Dorval,
Qu[eacute]bec H4S 1Y9, Canada; telephone 514-855-5000; fax 514-855-
7401; email: thd.crj@aero.bombardier.com; Internet http://www.bombardier.com.
   (3) You may review copies of the service information at the FAA,
Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton,
Washington. For information on the availability of this material at
the FAA, call 425-227-1221.
   (4) You may also review copies of the service information that
is incorporated by reference at the National Archives and Records
Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this
material at an NARA facility, call 202-741-6030, or go to http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html.

   Issued in Renton, Washington, on January 26, 2012.
  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Singapore Airlines will operate special commemorative flights between Singapore and Hong Kong on April 6th 2012 to mark the retirement of the Boeing 747 after nearly four decades of service. Flight SQ747 from Singapore to Hong Kong and SQ748 from Hong Kong to Singapore will be operated with the B747-400, replacing existing flights SQ860 and SQ863, which are normally operated with Airbus A330-300s.
  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

Boeing and Pakistan International Airlines have announced a firm order for five 777-300ER (extended range) airplanes.

Valued at nearly $1.5 billion at list prices, the order also includes purchase rights to Pakistan International Airlines for five additional 777-300ERs.

Based in Karachi, Pakistan International Airlines has been renewing its long-haul fleet to accommodate increased demand for air travel as well as to introduce new routes.

“With passenger traffic in our region accelerating, the new 777-300ER airplanes will continue to deliver the highest standards of technology and passenger comfort to our customers,” said Nadeem Yousufzai, managing director of Pakistan International Airlines.

“The spacious 777-300ER has been an integral part of our long-range fleet renewal program and its excellent operating economics, long range capability and reliability will allow us to expand into new long-haul markets.”

In 2002, Pakistan’s flag carrier became the world’s first airline to purchase all three passenger models of the 777 Family and in that year was also the launch customer for the 777-200LR (longer range) airplane.

“We are proud that Pakistan International Airlines is a special Boeing customer that continues to invest and trust in the industry-leading capabilities of the 777 family of airplanes,” said Marty Bentrott, vice president of sales for the Middle East, Russia and Central Asia, Boeing Commercial Airplanes.

“Boeing values the excellent partnership that was established over 10 years ago and one which we hope to continue well into the future as the airline progresses with its expansion plans.”

Last year was the best-selling year for the 777 program with a net order book of 200 surpassing the previous record of 154 orders set in 2005.

The 777-300ER brings new twin-engine efficiency to the airline’s long-haul fleet. The airplane is powered by General Electric GE90-115BLs, the world’s largest and most powerful commercial jet engines.

The airplane also features the Boeing Signature Interior that offers wider seats, wider aisles, more headroom and more seating flexibility.

  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW


DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2012-0149; Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-255-AD]
RIN 2120-AA64


Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM).

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for
certain The Boeing Company Model 777-200 and -300 series airplanes.
This proposed AD was prompted by reports of fatigue cracks in the lap
joints, which initiated at scribe lines that were made during
production when maskant was removed from the affected skin panels. This
proposed AD would require repetitive external phased-array ultrasonic
inspections to detect cracks of the affected fuselage skin lap splices
in Sections 41, 43, and 44, as applicable, and repair if necessary. We
are proposing this AD to detect and correct such fatigue cracking,
which, if not detected and corrected, could grow large and cause sudden
decompression and the inability to sustain limit flight and pressure
loads.

DATES: We must receive comments on this proposed AD by April 9, 2012.

ADDRESSES: You may send comments, using the procedures found in 14 CFR
11.43 and 11.45, by any of the following methods:
    Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments.
    Fax: 202-493-2251.
    Mail: U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket
Operations, M-30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New
Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590.
    Hand Delivery: Deliver to Mail address above between 9
a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays.
   For service information identified in this proposed AD, contact
Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Attention: Data & Services Management,
P.O. Box 3707, MC 2H-65, Seattle, Washington 98124-2207; telephone 206-
544-5000, extension 1; fax 206-766-5680; email me.boecom@boeing.com;
Internet https://www.myboeingfleet.com. You may review copies of the
referenced service information at the FAA, Transport Airplane
Directorate, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, Washington. For information
on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 425-227-1221.

Examining the AD Docket

   You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov; or in person at the Docket Management Facility
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal
holidays. The AD docket contains this proposed AD, the regulatory
evaluation, any comments received, and other information. The street
address for the Docket Office (phone: 800-647-5527) is in the ADDRESSES
section. Comments will be available in the AD docket shortly after
receipt.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: James Sutherland, Aerospace Engineer,
Airframe Branch, ANM-120S, FAA, Seattle Aircraft Certification Office,
1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, Washington 98057-3356; phone: 425-917-
6533; fax: 425-917-6590; email: James.Sutherland@faa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Comments Invited

   We invite you to send any written relevant data, views, or
arguments about this proposal. Send your comments to an address listed
under the ADDRESSES section. Include ``Docket No. FAA-2012-0149;
Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-255-AD'' at the beginning of your
comments. We specifically invite comments on the overall regulatory,
economic, environmental, and energy aspects of this proposed AD. We
will consider all comments received by the closing date and may amend
this proposed AD because of those comments.
   We will post all comments we receive, without change, to http://www.regulations.gov, including any personal information you provide. We
will also post a report summarizing each substantive verbal contact we
receive about this proposed AD.

Discussion

   We received a report indicating that, on the affected airplanes,
scribe lines may have been inadvertently made in the overlapped skin in
lap joints if a sharp tool was used to remove the maskant from the
aluminum skin panels during assembly of the affected lap joints. During
fatigue testing of Model 777 airplanes, lap joint cracks were found,
and analysis indicated that those cracks initiated at scribe lines that
were made during production when maskant was removed from the affected
skin panels. Such fatigue cracking, if not detected and corrected,
could grow large and cause sudden decompression and the inability to
sustain limit flight and pressure loads.

Relevant Service Information

   We reviewed Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 777-53A0043, dated
November 9, 2011. For information on the procedures and compliance
times, see this service information at http://www.regulations.gov by
searching for Docket No. FAA-2012-0149.

[[Page 10412]]

FAA's Determination

   We are proposing this AD because we evaluated all the relevant
information and determined the unsafe condition described previously is
likely to exist or develop in other products of the same type design.

Proposed AD Requirements

   This proposed AD would require repetitive external phased-array
ultrasonic inspections to detect cracks of the affected fuselage skin
lap splices in Sections 41, 43, and 44, as applicable, and repair if
necessary.

Difference Between the Proposed AD and the Service Information

   Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 777-53A0043, dated November 9, 2011,
specifies that one way to install a repair is to use ``other approved
methods.'' However, this proposed AD requires that the repair be done
using a method approved in accordance with the procedures specified in
paragraph (i) of this proposed AD.

Costs of Compliance

   We estimate that this proposed AD affects 46 airplanes of U.S.
registry.
   We estimate the following costs to comply with this proposed AD:

                                                Estimated Costs
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 Cost per
           Action                Labor cost      Parts cost      product            Cost on U.S. operators
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Inspections for Group 1        126 work-hours x           $0  $10,710 per      $267,750 per inspection cycle.
airplanes (25 airplanes).      $85 per hour =                 inspection
                               $10,710 per                    cycle.
                               inspection
                               cycle.
Inspections for Group 2        50 work-hours x             0  $4,250 per       $89,250 per inspection cycle.
airplanes (21 airplanes).      $85 per hour =                 inspection
                               $4,250 per                     cycle.
                               inspection
                               cycle.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

   We have received no definitive data that would enable us to provide
cost estimates for the on-condition repair.

Authority for This Rulemaking

   Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's authority to
issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the
authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII: Aviation Programs,
describes in more detail the scope of the Agency's authority.
   We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in
Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701: ``General
requirements.'' Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with
promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing
regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator
finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within
the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition
that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this
rulemaking action.

Regulatory Findings

   We determined that this proposed AD would not have federalism
implications under Executive Order 13132. This proposed AD would not
have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship
between the national Government and the States, or on the distribution
of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government.
   For the reasons discussed above, I certify this proposed
regulation:
   (1) Is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under Executive
Order 12866,
   (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies
and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979),
   (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and
   (4) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or
negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria
of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39

   Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by
reference, Safety.

The Proposed Amendment

   Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the
Administrator, the FAA proposes to amend 14 CFR part 39 as follows:

PART 39--AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES

   1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows:

   Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701.


Sec.  39.13  [Amended]

   2. The FAA amends Sec.  39.13 by adding the following new
airworthiness directive (AD):

The Boeing Company: Docket No. FAA-2012-0149; Directorate Identifier
2011-NM-255-AD.

(a) Comments Due Date

   We must receive comments by April 9, 2012.

(b) Affected ADs

   None.

(c) Applicability

   This AD applies to The Boeing Company Model 777-200 and -300
series airplanes, certificated in any category, as identified in
Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 777-53A0043, dated November 9, 2011.

(d) Subject

   Joint Aircraft System Component (JASC)/Air Transport Association
(ATA) of America Code 53, Fuselage.

(e) Unsafe Condition

   This AD was prompted by reports of fatigue cracks in the lap
joints, which initiated at scribe lines that were made during
production when maskant was removed from the affected skin panels.
We are issuing this AD to detect and correct such fatigue cracking,
which, if not detected and corrected, could grow large and cause
sudden decompression and the inability to sustain limit flight and
pressure loads.

(f) Compliance

   Comply with this AD within the compliance times specified,
unless already done.

(g) Inspections and Repair

   Except as provided by paragraph (h)(1) of this AD, at the
applicable time identified in paragraph 1.E., ``Compliance,'' of
Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 777-53A0043, dated November 9, 2011:
Do external phased-array ultrasonic inspections to detect cracks of
the affected fuselage skin lap splices in Sections 41, 43, and 44,
as applicable, in accordance with the Accomplishment Instructions of
Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 777-53A0043, dated November 9, 2011.
If any crack is found, before further flight, repair in accordance
with Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 777-53A0043, dated November 9,
2011; except as required by paragraph (h)(2) of this AD. Repeat the
inspections of unrepaired areas thereafter at intervals not to
exceed 4,200 flight cycles.

[[Page 10413]]

(h) Exception to Service Information

   (1) Where Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 777-53A0043, dated
November 9, 2011, specifies a compliance time ``after the original
issue date on this service bulletin,'' this AD requires compliance
within the specified compliance time after the effective date of
this AD.
   (2) Where Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 777-53A0043, dated
November 9, 2011, specifies that ``other approved methods'' can be
used to install a repair, this AD requires that the repair be done
using a method approved in accordance with the procedures specified
in paragraph (i) of this AD.

(i) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs)

   (1) The Manager, Seattle Aircraft Certification Office (ACO),
FAA, has the authority to approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested
using the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. In accordance with 14
CFR 39.19, send your request to your principal inspector or local
Flight Standards District Office, as appropriate. If sending
information directly to the manager of the ACO, send it to the
attention of the person identified in the Related Information
section of this AD. Information may be emailed to: 9-ANM-Seattle-ACO-AMOC-Requests@faa.gov.
   (2) Before using any approved AMOC, notify your appropriate
principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager
of the local flight standards district office/certificate holding
district office.
   (3) An AMOC that provides an acceptable level of safety may be
used for any repair required by this AD if it is approved by the
Boeing Commercial Airplanes Organization Designation Authorization
(ODA) that has been authorized by the Manager, Seattle ACO, to make
those findings. For a repair method to be approved, the repair must
meet the certification basis of the airplane, and the approval must
specifically refer to this AD.

(j) Related Information

   (1) For more information about this AD, contact James
Sutherland, Aerospace Engineer, Airframe Branch, ANM-120S, FAA,
Seattle Aircraft Certification Office, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton,
Washington 98057-3356; phone: 425-917-6533; fax: 425-917-6590;
email: James.Sutherland@faa.gov.
   (2) For service information identified in this AD, contact
Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Attention: Data & Services Management,
P. O. Box 3707, MC 2H-65, Seattle, Washington 98124-2207; telephone
206-544-5000, extension 1; fax 206-766-5680; email
me.boecom@boeing.com; Internet https://www.myboeingfleet.com. You
may also review the referenced service information in the docket at
http://www.regulations.gov (refer to Docket No. FAA-2012-0149). You may
review copies of the referenced service information at the FAA,
Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton,
Washington. For information on the availability of this material at
the FAA, call 425-227-1221.

   Issued in Renton, Washington, on February 10, 2012.
Ali Bahrami,
  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW


DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2012-0145; Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-066-AD]
RIN 2120-AA64


Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM).

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We propose to supersede an existing airworthiness directive
(AD) that applies to certain The Boeing Company Model 767 airplanes.
The existing AD currently requires revising the Airworthiness
Limitations Section of the maintenance planning data (MPD) document.
Since we issued that AD, a re-evaluation of certain doors and flaps was
done based on their fatigue-critical nature. This proposed AD would
revise the maintenance program to incorporate an additional limitation,
and would add airplanes to the applicability. We are proposing this AD
to detect and correct fatigue cracking of the principal structural
element (PSEs), which could adversely affect the structural integrity
of the airplane.

DATES: We must receive comments on this proposed AD by April 9, 2012.

ADDRESSES: You may send comments, using the procedures found in 14 CFR
11.43 and 11.45, by any of the following methods:
    Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments.
    Fax: 202-493-2251.
    Mail: U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket
Operations, M-30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New
Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590.
    Hand Delivery: Deliver to Mail address above between 9
a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays.

[[Page 10404]]

   For service information identified in this AD, contact Boeing
Commercial Airplanes, Attention: Data & Services Management, P.O. Box
3707, MC 2H-65, Seattle, Washington 98124-2207; telephone 206-544-5000,
extension 1; fax 206-766-5680; email me.boecom@boeing.com; Internet
https://www.myboeingfleet.com. You may review copies of the referenced
service information at the FAA, Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601
Lind Avenue SW., Renton, Washington. For information on the
availability of this material at the FAA, call 425-227-1221.

Examining the AD Docket

   You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov; or in person at the Docket Management Facility
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal
holidays. The AD docket contains this proposed AD, the regulatory
evaluation, any comments received, and other information. The street
address for the Docket Office (phone: 800-647-5527) is in the ADDRESSES
section. Comments will be available in the AD docket shortly after
receipt.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Berhane Alazar, Aerospace Engineer,
Airframe Branch, ANM-120S, FAA, Seattle Aircraft Certification Office,
1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, Washington 98057-3356; phone: 425-917-
6577; fax: 425-917-6590; email: berhane.alazar@faa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Comments Invited

   We invite you to send any written relevant data, views, or
arguments about this proposed AD. Send your comments to an address
listed under the ADDRESSES section. Include ``Docket No. FAA-2012-0145;
Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-066-AD'' at the beginning of your
comments. We specifically invite comments on the overall regulatory,
economic, environmental, and energy aspects of this proposed AD. We
will consider all comments received by the closing date and may amend
this proposed AD because of those comments.
   We will post all comments we receive, without change, to http://www.regulations.gov, including any personal information you provide. We
will also post a report summarizing each substantive verbal contact we
receive about this proposed AD.

Discussion

   On September 4, 2003, we issued AD 2003-18-10, amendment 39-13301
(68 FR 53503, September 11, 2003), for certain The Boeing Company Model
767-200, -300, -300F, and -400ER series airplanes. That AD requires
revising Subsection B, Section 9, of Boeing 767 Maintenance Planning
Data (MPD) Document D622T001-9, titled ``Airworthiness Limitations
(AWLs) and Certification Maintenance Requirements (CMRs),'' to
incorporate Revision October 2002; and Appendix B of Boeing 767 MPD
Document D622T001, Revision December 2002. That AD resulted from
analysis of data that identified specific initial inspection thresholds
and repetitive inspection intervals for certain principal structural
elements (PSEs) to be added to the airworthiness limitation
instructions (ALI). We issued that AD to ensure that fatigue cracking
of various PSEs is detected and corrected; such fatigue cracking could
adversely affect the structural integrity of these airplanes.

Actions Since Existing AD Was Issued

   Since we issued AD 2003-18-10 (68 FR 53503, September 11, 2003), a
re-evaluation of certain doors and flaps was done based on their
fatigue-critical nature. These items were classified as PSEs and have
been included in the revised MPD Document.

Relevant Service Information

   We reviewed Subsection B, Airworthiness Limitations--Structural
Inspections, of Section 9, Airworthiness Limitations (AWLs) and
Certification Maintenance Requirements (CMRs), D622T001-9, Revision
July 2011, of the Boeing 767 Maintenance Planning Data (MPD) Document.
This service information describes procedures for an additional
critical fatigue inspection.

FAA's Determination

   We are proposing this AD because we evaluated all the relevant
information and determined the unsafe condition described previously is
likely to exist or develop in other products of the same type design.

Proposed AD Requirements

   This proposed AD would retain certain requirements of AD 2003-18-10
(68 FR 53503, September 11, 2003). This proposed AD would revise the
Airworthiness Limitations Section of the Maintenance Planning Data
(MPD) Document 767 Airworthiness Limitations Instructions (ALI) which
adds a critical fatigue inspection and revises the applicability to
include additional airplane line numbers.

Change to Existing AD

   This proposed AD would retain certain requirements of AD 2003-18-10
(68 FR 53503, September 11, 2003). Since AD 2003-18-10 was issued, the
AD format has been revised, and certain paragraphs have been
rearranged. As a result, the corresponding paragraph identifiers have
changed in this proposed AD, as listed in the following table:

                     Revised Paragraph Identifiers
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Requirement in AD 2003-18-10 (68 FR   Corresponding requirement in this
    53503, September 11, 2003)                  proposed AD
------------------------------------------------------------------------
          paragraph (c)                        paragraph (g)
          paragraph (d)                        paragraph (h)
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Costs of Compliance

   We estimate that this proposed AD affects 417 airplanes of U.S.
registry.
   We estimate the following costs to comply with this proposed AD:

                                                Estimated Costs
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                   Cost per       Cost on U.S.
              Action                        Labor cost           Parts cost        product         operators
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Revise airworthiness limitations      1 work-hour x $85 per                 $0              $85          $35,445
[retained actions from existing AD    hour = $85.
2003-18-10 (68 FR 53503, September
11, 2003)].
Revise airworthiness limitations      1 work-hour x $85 per                  0               85           35,445
[new requirements].                   hour = $85.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


[[Page 10405]]

Authority for This Rulemaking

   Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's authority to
issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, Section 106, describes the
authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation Programs,
describes in more detail the scope of the Agency's authority.
   We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in
Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701, ``General
requirements.'' Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with
promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing
regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator
finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within
the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition
that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this
rulemaking action.

Regulatory Findings

   We have determined that this proposed AD would not have federalism
implications under Executive Order 13132. This proposed AD would not
have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship
between the national Government and the States, or on the distribution
of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government.
   For the reasons discussed above, I certify that the proposed
regulation:
   (1) Is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under Executive
Order 12866,
   (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies
and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979),
   (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and
   (4) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or
negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria
of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39

   Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by
reference, Safety.

The Proposed Amendment

   Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the
Administrator, the FAA proposes to amend 14 CFR part 39 as follows:

PART 39--AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES

   1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows:

   Authority:  49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701.


Sec.  39.13  [Amended]

   2. The FAA amends Sec.  39.13 by removing airworthiness directive
(AD) 2003-18-10, Amendment 39-13301 (68 FR 53503, September 11, 2003),
and adding the following new AD:

The Boeing Company: Docket No. FAA-2012-0145; Directorate Identifier
2011-NM-066-AD.

(a) Comments Due Date

   The FAA must receive comments on this AD action by April 9,
2012.

(b) Affected ADs

   This AD supersedes AD 2003-18-10, Amendment 39-13301 (68 FR
53503, September 11, 2003).

(c) Applicability

   This AD applies to The Boeing Company Model 767-200, -300, -
300F, and -400ER series airplanes; certificated in any category;
line numbers 1 through 997 inclusive.

   Note 1:  This AD requires revisions to certain operator
maintenance documents to include new inspections. Compliance with
these inspections is required by 14 CFR 91.403(c). For airplanes
that have been previously modified, altered, or repaired in the
areas addressed by these inspections, the operator may not be able
to accomplish the inspections described in the revisions. In this
situation, to comply with 14 CFR 91.403(c), the operator must
request approval for an alternative method of compliance according
to paragraph (k) of this AD. The request should include a
description of changes to the required inspections that will ensure
the continued damage tolerance of the affected structure. The FAA
has provided guidance for this determination in Advisory Circular
(AC) 25.1529-1A.

(d) Subject

   Joint Aircraft System Component (JASC)/Air Transport Association
(ATA) of America Code 51, Standard Practices/Structures; 52, Doors;
53, Fuselage structure; 54, Nacelle/Pylons; 55, Stabilizers; 56,
Windows; and 57, Wings.

(e) Unsafe Condition

   This AD was prompted by a re-evaluation of certain doors and
flaps based on their fatigue-critical nature. We are issuing this AD
to detect and correct fatigue cracking of the principal structural
elements (PSEs), which could adversely affect the structural
integrity of the airplane.

(f) Compliance

   Comply with this AD within the compliance times specified,
unless already done.

Restatement of Requirements AD 2003-18-10, Amendment 39-13301 (68 FR
53503, September 11, 2003), With New Service Information

(g) Revise Section 9 of the Boeing 767 Maintenance Planning Data (MPD)
Document

   For Model 767-200, -300, -300F, and -400ER series airplanes
having line numbers 1 through 895 inclusive: Within 18 months after
October 16, 2003 (the effective date AD 2003-18-10, (68 FR 53503,
September 11, 2003)), revise Subsection B, Section 9, of Boeing 767
MPD Document D622T001-9, entitled ``Airworthiness Limitations and
Certification Maintenance Requirements,'' to incorporate Revision
October 2002; and Appendix B of Boeing 767 MPD Document D622T001,
Revision December 2002; or Subsection B, Airworthiness Limitations--
Structural Limitations, of Section 9, Airworthiness Limitations
(AWLs) and Certification Maintenance Requirements (CMRs), D622T001-
9, Revision July 2011, of the Boeing 767 MPD Document.

(h) Alternative Inspections and Inspection Intervals

   Except as provided by paragraphs (i) and (k) of this AD: After
the actions required by paragraph (g) of this AD have been
accomplished, no alternative inspections or inspection intervals
shall be approved for the structural significant items (SSIs)
contained in Section 9 of Boeing 767 MPD Document D622T001-9,
Revision October 2002.

New Requirements of This AD

(i) Maintenance Program Revision

   Within 18 months after the effective date of this AD, revise the
maintenance program to incorporate the limitations section in
Subsection B, Airworthiness Limitations--Structural Inspections, of
Section 9, Airworthiness Limitations (AWLs) and Certification
Maintenance Requirements (CMRs), D622T001-9, Revision July 2011, of
the Boeing 767 MPD Document. Doing this revision terminates the
requirements of paragraph (g) of this AD.

   Note 2:  For the purposes of this AD, the terms principal
structural elements (PSEs) as used in this AD, and SSIs as used in
Subsection B, Airworthiness Limitations--Structural Inspections, of
Section 9, Airworthiness Limitations (AWLs) and Certification
Maintenance Requirements (CMRs), D622T001-9, Revision July 2011, of
the Boeing 767 MPD Document, are considered to be interchangeable.

(j) Alternative Inspections and Inspection Intervals

   Except as provided by paragraph (k) of this AD: After the
actions required by paragraph (i) of this AD have been accomplished,
no alternative inspections or inspection intervals shall be approved
for the SSIs contained in Subsection B, Airworthiness Limitations--
Structural Inspections, of Section 9, Airworthiness Limitations
(AWLs) and Certification Maintenance Requirements (CMRs), D622T001-
9, Revision July 2011, of the Boeing 767 MPD Document.

(k) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs)

   (1) The Manager, Seattle Aircraft Certification Office (ACO),
ANM-120S, FAA, has the authority to approve AMOCs for this AD, if
requested using the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. In accordance
with 14 CFR 39.19, send your request to your principal inspector or
local Flight Standards District Office, as appropriate. If sending
information

[[Page 10406]]

directly to the manager of the ACO, send it to the attention of the
person identified in the Related Information section of this AD.
Information may be emailed to: 9-ANM-Seattle-ACO-AMOC-Requests@faa.gov.
   (2) Before using any approved AMOC, notify your appropriate
principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager
of the local flight standards district office/certificate holding
district office.
   (3) An AMOC that provides an acceptable level of safety may be
used for any repair required by this AD if it is approved by the
Boeing Commercial Airplanes Organization Designation Authorization
(ODA) that has been authorized by the Manager, Seattle Aircraft
Certification Office (ACO) to make those findings. For a repair
method to be approved, the repair must meet the certification basis
of the airplane and 14 CFR 25.571, Amendment 45, and the approval
must specifically refer to this AD.

(l) Related Information

   (1) For more information about this AD, contact Berhane Alazar,
Aerospace Engineer, Airframe Branch, ANM-120S, FAA, Seattle Aircraft
Certification Office, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, Washington
98057-3356; phone: 425-917-6577; fax: 425-917-6590; email:
berhane.alazar@faa.gov.
   (2) For service information identified in this AD, contact
Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Attention: Data & Services Management,
P.O. Box 3707, MC 2H-65, Seattle, Washington 98124-2207; telephone
206-544-5000, extension 1; fax 206-766-5680; email
me.boecom@boeing.com; Internet https://www.myboeingfleet.com. You
may review copies of the referenced service information at the FAA,
Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton,
Washington. For information on the availability of this material at
the FAA, call 425-227-1221.

   Issued in Renton, Washington, on February 9, 2012.
Ali Bahrami,
  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2012-0147; Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-067-AD]
RIN 2120-AA64


Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM).

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We propose to supersede an existing airworthiness directive
(AD) that applies to certain The Boeing Company Model 767-200 and -300
series airplanes. The existing AD requires replacement of the existing
deactivation pin, aft cascade pin bushing, and pin insert on each
thrust reverser half with new, improved components. Since we issued
that AD, we received reports that certain airplanes require
installation of a new bushing and deactivation pin with increased load
carrying capability and all airplanes powered by Pratt & Whitney JT9D
series engines require installation of a new bracket for stowing the
deactivation pin. This proposed AD would add a dye penetrant inspection
for cracking of the rivet holes of the bushing plate and repair or
replacement, if necessary. For certain airplanes, this proposed AD
would require replacing the existing bushing with a new bushing and
deactivation pin; and installing a new or serviceable stowage bracket
for the deactivation pins on all airplanes powered by Pratt & Whitney
JT9D series engines. We are proposing this AD to prevent failure of the
thrust reverser deactivation pins, which could fail to prevent a
deployment of a deactivated thrust reverser in flight and consequent
reduced controllability of the airplane.

DATES: We must receive comments on this proposed AD by April 9, 2012.

ADDRESSES: You may send comments, using the procedures found in 14 CFR
11.43 and 11.45, by any of the following methods:
    Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments.
    Fax: 202-493-2251.
    Mail: U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket
Operations, M-30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New
Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590.
    Hand Delivery: Deliver to Mail address above between 9
a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays.
   For service information identified in this AD, contact Boeing
Commercial Airplanes, Attention: Data & Services Management, P.O. Box
3707, MC 2H-65, Seattle, Washington 98124-2207; telephone 206-544-5000,
extension 1; fax 206-766-5680; email me.boecom@boeing.com; Internet
https://www.myboeingfleet.com. You may review copies of the referenced
service information at the FAA, Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601
Lind Avenue SW., Renton, Washington. For information on the
availability of this material at the FAA, call 425-227-1221.

Examining the AD Docket

   You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov; or in person at the Docket Management Facility
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal
holidays. The AD docket contains this proposed AD, the regulatory
evaluation, any comments received, and other information. The street
address for the Docket Office (phone: 800-647-5527) is in the ADDRESSES
section. Comments will be available in the AD docket shortly after
receipt.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Rebel Nichols, Aerospace Engineer,
Propulsion Branch, ANM-140S, FAA, Seattle Aircraft Certification Office
(ACO), 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, Washington 98057-3356; phone: 425-
917-6509; fax: 425-917-6590; email: rebel.nichols@faa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Comments Invited

   We invite you to send any written relevant data, views, or
arguments about this proposed AD. Send your comments to an address
listed under the ADDRESSES section. Include ``Docket No. FAA-2012-0147;
Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-067-AD'' at the beginning of your
comments. We specifically invite comments on the overall regulatory,
economic, environmental, and energy aspects of this proposed AD. We
will consider all comments received by the closing date and may amend
this proposed AD because of those comments.
   We will post all comments we receive, without change, to http://www.regulations.gov, including any personal information you provide. We
will also post a report summarizing each substantive verbal contact we
receive about this proposed AD.

Discussion

   On September 19, 2002, we issued AD 2002-19-11, Amendment 39-12891
(67 FR 61478, October 1, 2002), for certain Model 767-200 and -300
series airplanes powered by Pratt & Whitney JT9D series engines. The
existing AD requires replacement of the existing deactivation pin, aft
cascade pin bushing, and pin insert on each thrust reverser half, with
new, improved components. The existing AD resulted from reports that
the pin insert for the deactivation pin was not able to withstand the
load of a powered deployment and could fail on some airplanes. We
issued that AD to prevent failure of the thrust reverser deactivation
pins, which could fail to

[[Page 10407]]

prevent a deployment of a deactivated thrust reverser in flight and
consequent reduced controllability of the airplane.

Actions Since Existing AD Was Issued

   Since we issued AD 2002-19-11, Amendment 39-12891 (67 FR 61478,
October 1, 2002), we received reports indicating that certain airplanes
require installation of a new bushing and pin with increased load
carrying capability, and all airplanes powered by Pratt & Whitney JT9D
series engines require installation of a new bracket for stowing the
deactivation pin. Specifically, we have been advised that the part
number (P/N) 315T3222-3 bushing could not be replaced by the P/N
315T3222-10 bushing due to inadequate edge margin on the early thrust
reverser configuration.

Relevant Service Information

   AD 2002-19-11, Amendment 39-12891 (67 FR 61478, October 1, 2002),
refers to Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 767-78A0089, Revision 1, dated
May 30, 2002, as the appropriate source of service information for the
required actions. Boeing has since revised this service information. We
reviewed Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 767-78A0089, Revision 5, dated
June 9, 2009, which identifies additional work that needs to be
performed on specifically configured Group 2 airplanes for doing a dye
penetrant inspection for cracking of the rivet holes of the bushing
plate; repair or replacement of the bushing plate with a new or
serviceable bushing plate if necessary; and replacing any existing P/N
315T3222-3 or P/N 315T3222-10 bushing and deactivation pin with a new
P/N 315T3221-1 bushing and new P/N 315T1604-6 deactivation pin to
provide adequate edge margin. Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 767-
78A0089, Revision 5, dated June 9, 2009, also identifies additional
work for installing a new or serviceable stowage bracket for the
deactivation pins on all airplanes powered by Pratt & Whitney JT9D
series engines.

FAA's Determination

   We are proposing this AD because we evaluated all the relevant
information and determined the unsafe condition described previously is
likely to exist or develop in other products of these same type
designs.

Proposed AD Requirements

   This proposed AD would retain all requirements of AD 2002-19-11,
Amendment 39-12891 (67 FR 61478, October 1, 2002). This proposed AD
would also require accomplishing the actions specified in the service
information described previously.

Change to Existing AD

   Since AD 2002-19-11, Amendment 39-12891 (67 FR 61478, October 1,
2002), was issued, the AD format has been revised, and certain
paragraphs have been rearranged. As a result, paragraphs (a) and (b) of
AD 2002-19-11 Amendment 39-12891 (67 FR 61478, October 1, 2002), have
been re-identified as paragraphs (g) and (h) in this proposed AD.

Costs of Compliance

   We estimate that this proposed AD affects 23 airplanes of U.S.
registry. We estimate the following costs to comply with this proposed
AD:

                                                                    Estimated Costs
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                        Number of U.S.
                    Action                                   Labor cost                 Parts cost        Cost per        registered      Cost on U.S.
                                                                                                          product         airplanes        operators
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Replace deactivation pin, pin bushing, and pin    12 work-hours x $85 per hour =              $12,108          $13,128               23         $301,944
insert (retained actions from existing AD 2002-   $1,020 per inspection cycle.
19-11, Amendment 39[dash]12891 (67 FR 61478,
October 1, 2002).
Group 1: Install stowage bracket for              17 work-hours x $85 per hour =               14,644           16,089               16          257,424
deactivation pin (new proposed action).           $1,445.
Group 2: Replace bushing and deactivation pin     17 work-hours x $85 per hour =               19,972           21,417                7          149,919
and install stowage bracket for thrust reverser   $1,445.
deactivation pin (new proposed action).
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

   We have received no definitive data that would enable us to provide
cost estimates for the on-condition actions (repair or replacement of
bushing plate) specified in this proposed AD.

Authority for This Rulemaking

   Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's authority to
issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, Section 106, describes the
authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation Programs,
describes in more detail the scope of the Agency's authority.
   We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in
Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701, ``General
requirements.'' Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with
promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing
regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator
finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within
the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition
that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this
rulemaking action.

Regulatory Findings

   We have determined that this proposed AD would not have federalism
implications under Executive Order 13132. This proposed AD would not
have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship
between the national Government and the States, or on the distribution
of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government.
   For the reasons discussed above, I certify that the proposed
regulation:
   (1) Is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under Executive
Order 12866,
   (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies
and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979),
   (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and
   (4) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or
negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria
of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39

   Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by
reference, Safety.

[[Page 10408]]

The Proposed Amendment

   Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the
Administrator, the FAA proposes to amend 14 CFR part 39 as follows:

PART 39--AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES

   1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows:

   Authority:  49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701.


Sec.  39.13  [Amended]

   2. The FAA amends Sec.  39.13 by removing airworthiness directive
(AD) 2002-19-11, Amendment 39-12891 (67 FR 61478, October 1, 2002), and
adding the following new AD:

The Boeing Company: Docket No. FAA-2012-0147; Directorate Identifier
2011-NM-067-AD.

(a) Comments Due Date

   The FAA must receive comments on this AD action by April 9,
2012.

(b) Affected ADs

   This AD supersedes AD 2002-19-11, Amendment 39-12891 (67 FR
61478, October 1, 2002).

(c) Applicability

   This AD applies to The Boeing Company Model 767-200 and -300
series airplanes, certificated in any category; as identified in
Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 767-78A0089, Revision 5, dated June 9,
2009.

(d) Subject

   Joint Aircraft System Component (JASC)/Air Transport Association
(ATA) of America Code 7830, Thrust Reverser.

(e) Unsafe Condition

   This AD was prompted by reports that certain airplanes require
installation of a new bushing and deactivation pin with increased
load carrying capability and all airplanes powered by Pratt &
Whitney JT9D series engines require installation of a new bracket
for stowing the deactivation pin. We are issuing this AD to prevent
failure of the thrust reverser deactivation pins, which could fail
to prevent a deployment of a deactivated thrust reverser in flight
and consequent reduced controllability of the airplane.

(f) Compliance

   Comply with this AD within the compliance times specified,
unless already done.

Restatement of Requirements of AD 2002-19-11, Amendment 39-12891 (67 FR
61478, October 1, 2002), With Revised Service Information

(g) Replacement of Deactivation Pin, Pin Bushing, and Pin Insert

   Within 24 months after November 5, 2002 (the effective date of
AD 2002-19-11, Amendment 39-12891 (67 FR 61478, October 1, 2002)),
replace the existing deactivation pin, pin bushing in the aft
cascade mounting ring, and pin insert on each thrust reverser half,
with new, improved components, in accordance with Boeing Alert
Service Bulletin 767-78A0089, Revision 1, dated May 30, 2002; or
Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 767-78A0089, Revision 5, dated June 9,
2009. After the effective date of this AD, only Boeing Alert Service
Bulletin 767-78A0089, Revision 5, dated June 9, 2009, may be used.

   Note to paragraph (g): The new, improved insert flange and pin
bushing does not physically preclude use of a deactivation pin
having P/N 315T1604-2 or -5. However, use of deactivation pins
having P/N 315T1604-2 or -5 may not prevent the thrust reversers
from deploying in the event of a full powered deployment. Therefore,
thrust reversers modified per AD 2002-19-11, Amendment 39-12891 (67
FR 61478, October 1, 2002), are required to be installed with the
new, longer deactivation pins having P/N 315T1604-6, as specified in
Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 767-78A0089, Revision 1, dated May 30,
2002, or Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 767-78A0089, Revision 5,
dated June 9, 2009. After the effective date of this AD, only Boeing
Alert Service Bulletin 767-78A0089, Revision 5, dated June 9, 2009,
may be used.

New Requirements of This AD

(h) Inspection, Bushing and Pin Replacement, and Installation of
Stowage Bracket

   Within 24 months after the effective date of this AD, do the
applicable actions specified in paragraphs (h)(1) and (h)(2) of this
AD.
   (1) For Group 2 airplanes as identified in Boeing Alert Service
Bulletin 767-78A0089, Revision 5, dated June 9, 2009, do a dye
penetrant inspection for cracking of the rivet holes and replace any
P/N 315T3222-3 or P/N 315T3222-10 bushing and deactivation pin with
a new or serviceable P/N 315T3221-1 bushing and new P/N 315T1604-6
deactivation pin, in accordance with the Accomplishment Instructions
of Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 767-78A0089, Revision 5, dated June
9, 2009. If any crack is found in the rivet holes of the bushing
plate, before further flight, repair or replace the bushing plate
with a new or serviceable bushing plate, as applicable, using a
method approved in accordance with the procedures specified in
paragraph (j) of this AD.
   (2) For both Group 1 and Group 2 airplanes, as identified in
Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 767-78A0089, Revision 5, dated June 9,
2009, install a new or serviceable stowage bracket assembly (P/N
015T0196-4 for the right thrust reverser, P/N 015T0196-5 for the
left thrust reverser), in accordance with the Accomplishment
Instructions of Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 767-78A0089, Revision
5, dated June 9, 2009.

(i) Credit for Actions Accomplished in Accordance With Previous Service
Information

   Actions accomplished before the effective date of this AD in
accordance with Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 767-78A0089, Revision
2, dated March 13, 2003; Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 767-78A0089,
Revision 3, dated December 18, 2003; or Boeing Alert Service
Bulletin 767-78A0089, Revision 4, dated March 6, 2008; are
considered acceptable for compliance with the corresponding
requirements of paragraph (g) of this AD.

(j) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs)

   (1) The Manager, Seattle Aircraft Certification Office (ACO),
FAA, has the authority to approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested
using the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. In accordance with 14
CFR 39.19, send your request to your principal inspector or local
Flight Standards District Office, as appropriate. If sending
information directly to the manager of the ACO, send it to the
attention of the person identified in the Related Information
section of this AD. Information may be emailed to: 9-ANM-Seattle-ACO-AMOC-Requests@faa.gov.
   (2) Before using any approved AMOC, notify your appropriate
principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager
of the local flight standards district office/certificate holding
district office.
   (3) AMOCs approved for AD 2002-19-11, Amendment 39-12891 (67 FR
61478, October 1, 2002), are approved as AMOCs for the corresponding
provisions of paragraph (g) of this AD.

(k) Related Information

   (1) For more information about this AD, contact Rebel Nichols,
Aerospace Engineer, Propulsion Branch, ANM-140S, FAA, Seattle
Aircraft Certification Office (ACO), 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton,
Washington 98057-3356; phone: 425-917-6509; fax: 425-917-6590;
email: rebel.nichols@faa.gov.
   (2) For service information identified in this AD, contact
Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Attention: Data & Services Management,
P.O. Box 3707, MC 2H-65, Seattle, Washington 98124-2207; telephone
206-544-5000, extension 1; fax 206-766-5680; email
me.boecom@boeing.com; Internet https://www.myboeingfleet.com. You
may review copies of the referenced service information at the FAA,
Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton,
Washington. For information on the availability of this material at
the FAA, call 425-227-1221.

   Issued in Renton, Washington, on February 10, 2012.
Ali Bahrami,
  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
February 20, 2012
 

EVERETT, Wash. /PRNewswire/ -- Boeing [NYSE: BA] and Pakistan International Airlines today announced a firm order for five 777-300ER (extended range) airplanes. Valued at nearly $1.5 billion at list prices, the order also includes purchase rights to Pakistan International Airlines for five additional 777-300ERs.
 

Based in Karachi, Pakistan International Airlines has been renewing its long-haul fleet to accommodate increased demand for air travel as well as to introduce new routes.
 

"With passenger traffic in our region accelerating, the new 777-300ER airplanes will continue to deliver the highest standards of technology and passenger comfort to our customers," said Capt. Nadeem Yousufzai, Managing Director of Pakistan International Airlines. "The spacious 777-300ER has been an integral part of our long-range fleet renewal program and its excellent operating economics, long range capability and reliability will allow us to expand into new long-haul markets."
 

In 2002, Pakistan's flag carrier became the world's first airline to purchase all three passenger models of the 777 Family and in that year was also the launch customer for the 777-200LR (longer range) airplane.
 

"We are proud that Pakistan International Airlines is a special Boeing customer that continues to invest and trust in the industry-leading capabilities of the 777 family of airplanes," said Marty Bentrott, vice president of Sales for the Middle East, Russia and Central Asia, Boeing Commercial Airplanes. "Boeing values the excellent partnership that was established over 10 years ago and one which we hope to continue well into the future as the airline progresses with its expansion plans."
 

Source: Boeing
  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

SINGAPORE - Some 55 of 787 Dreamliner planes could have a recently discovered fuselage flaws, Boeing said on Wednesday, while reiterating that the world's first carbon-plastic passenger plane is safe to fly.

According to Reuters, Boeing earlier this month reported signs of "delamination" on a support structure in the rear fuselage, the latest in a series of glitches in developing the revolutionary jet.

The company is examining a backlog of assembled Dreamliners to see whether they show similar signs of stress, which it has blamed on incorrect "shimming" -- a process planemakers use to fill tiny gaps when aircraft are built.

"All the airplanes that were built up to plane 55 have the potential for the shimming issue," James Albaugh, chief executive officer of Boeing Commercial Airplanes, told reporters during a media roundtable in Singapore.

Albaugh said the problem was "very fixable."

"We are in the process of fixing the airplanes that are in the (production) flow," he said. "There is no safety or flight issue on the airplanes that we have delivered."

Although composite parts have been in use for years, the 787 is the first airliner built mainly out of the new materials, which help airlines to save fuel by reducing aircraft weight.

Albaugh said the inspections might affect delivery of the aircraft to customers in the short term, but the company still expects to meet its target for this year.

The first six aircraft produced are generally test models.

Reuters reports that the analysts have said the discovery of the flaw some nine weeks after the aircraft entered service has raised questions over whether Boeing can meet what many already saw as an ambitious plan to raise output to 10 a month by the end of 2013 from 2.5 now.

Sticking to the plans, Boeing expects to boost monthly output to 3.5 in the second quarter and to five by year-end.

DECISION ON 787 STRETCH BY YEAR-END

Boeing has so far delivered five of the aircraft to Japan's All Nippon Airways, which put the plane into regular passenger service starting on Dec. 1. Due to production problems, that was three years later than originally planned.

ANA said Boeing had contacted the airline to say there were no safety issues involved in shimming and to give a general indication of the inspection procedure.

Boeing has promised to deliver a detailed procedure, which ANA expects to get soon. Meanwhile, all of its five Dreamliners are operating normally, the airline said.

Japan Airlines has already said it no longer expected its first Dreamliner by the end of February as a result of the manufacturing glitch.

The 787 problem comes as Boeing rival Airbus investigates the cause of cracks in part of the wings of its A380 superjumbo. It also insists its jets are safe.

Chief Executive Officer Tom Enders pledged last week that Airbus would apply lessons from the A380 glitches to the development of the A350, which is the European company's carbon-composite answer to the 787 Dreamliner.

Boeing will decide whether to go ahead with plans to produce a stretched, or longer, version of the 787 Dreamliner by the end of this year, Albaugh said.

Most aircraft analysts expected Boeing to push ahead with the 787-10, which would carry around 320 people, 40 more than the longest 787 version currently on offer, the 787-9.

The 787 and A350 address the mid-sized segment of the market, which is expected to number several thousand aircraft in coming decades as airlines renew fleets to save fuel and open up new routes.

Airbus and Boeing are also battling to maintain a roughly equal share of the single-aisle aircraft segment, the industry's largest by volume, after updating their best-selling 150-seat jets with new engines.

Airbus took the lead last year with strong sales of its A320neo, but Boeing is redressing the balance with its 737 MAX.

"We have over 1,100 commitments, and our goal this year is to turn all of those into firm orders," Albaugh told reporters, adding that Boeing aimed for a couple of thousand firm orders by the time the updated aircraft enters service in 2017.

"If there really is a softening in the economy, you could see some deferrals, you could see some people cancelling and you could see fewer orders," Albaugh said.

Underlining concerns about the economy, Singapore Airlines said on Wednesday that it was cutting cargo capacity by 20 percent because of weak demand and high fuel prices.

  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW


Cathay Pacific has taken delivery of a new Boeing 777-300ER, the first aircraft to feature its Premium Economy Class product and new long-haul Economy Class seats.

The aircraft – the airline’s 25th 777-300ER – arrived at Hong Kong International Airport earlier.

Speaking at a ceremony celebrating the event Cathay Pacific chief operating officer Ivan Chu said: “This is an important development for Cathay Pacific – another big step in our commitment to provide outstanding products and services to our passengers.

“We’re confident that both these new products will be winners, especially when combined with the famous Cathay Pacific service.”

As well as introducing a totally new seat and entertainment system, Cathay Pacific has designed the entire customer experience to be more special for its new Premium Economy Class passengers.


To begin with, the new Premium Economy experience features a quieter, more spacious cabin than the traditional Economy Class with between 26 and 34 seats per aircraft.

The seat pitch is 38 inches – six inches more than Economy Class – and the seat itself is wider and has a bigger recline.

It has a large meal table, cocktail table, footrest, a 10.6-inch personal television, an in-seat power outlet, a multi-port connector for personal devices and extra personal stowage space.


Complementing these features, passengers will also benefit from priority check-in at dedicated counters and priority boarding before Economy Class passengers.

Increase baggage allowances, an environmentally friendly amenity kit, larger pillows and noise-cancelling headsets will also be offered to Premium Economy passengers.

Passengers can book the Premium Economy seats for flights departing from April 1st onwards which will initially be featured on selected flights on Sydney, Toronto, Vancouver, and New York routes.

  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW


DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2012-0186; Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-268-AD]
RIN 2120-AA64


Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM).

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for
certain The Boeing Company Model 737-600, -700, -700C, -800, -900, and
-900ER series airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of
flight crew failure to activate air data probe heat. This proposed AD
would require modifying the anti-icing system for the angle of attack
sensor, the total air temperature, and the pitot probes. We are
proposing this AD to prevent ice from forming on air data system
sensors and consequent loss of or misleading airspeed indication on all
airspeed indicating systems, which could lead to loss of control of the
airplane.

DATES: We must receive comments on this proposed AD by April 13, 2012.

ADDRESSES: You may send comments, using the procedures found in 14 CFR
11.43 and 11.45, by any of the following methods:
    Federal eRulemaking Portal: Go to http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments.
    Fax: 202-493-2251.
    Mail: U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket
Operations, M-30, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New
Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590.
    Hand Delivery: Deliver to Mail address above between 9
a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal holidays.
   For service information identified in this proposed AD, contact
Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Attention: Data & Services Management,
P.O. Box 3707, MC 2H-65, Seattle, Washington 98124-2207; telephone 206-
544-5000,

[[Page 11790]]

extension 1; fax 206-766-5680; email me.boecom@boeing.com; Internet
https://www.myboeingfleet.com. You may review copies of the referenced
service information at the FAA, Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601
Lind Avenue SW., Renton, Washington. For information on the
availability of this material at the FAA, call 425-227-1221.

Examining the AD Docket

   You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov; or in person at the Docket Management Facility
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal
holidays. The AD docket contains this proposed AD, the regulatory
evaluation, any comments received, and other information. The street
address for the Docket Office (phone: 800-647-5527) is in the ADDRESSES
section. Comments will be available in the AD docket shortly after
receipt.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Frank Carreras, Aerospace Engineer,
Systems and Equipment Branch, ANM-130S, FAA, Seattle Aircraft
Certification Office (ACO), 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, Washington
98057-3356; phone: 425-917-6442; fax: 425-917-6590; email:
frank.carreras@faa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Comments Invited

   We invite you to send any written relevant data, views, or
arguments about this proposal. Send your comments to an address listed
under the ADDRESSES section. Include ``Docket No. FAA-2012-0186;
Directorate Identifier 2011-NM-268-AD'' at the beginning of your
comments. We specifically invite comments on the overall regulatory,
economic, environmental, and energy aspects of this proposed AD. We
will consider all comments received by the closing date and may amend
this proposed AD because of those comments.
   We will post all comments we receive, without change, to http://www.regulations.gov, including any personal information you provide. We
will also post a report summarizing each substantive verbal contact we
receive about this proposed AD.

Discussion

   The air data sensor heating system, when ON, heats the pitot probes
that measure air pressure resulting from the airplane's motion through
the air in order to provide airspeed indications to the flight crew.
This heating prevents ice from forming inside the pitot probes, which
would degrade or block the probes' ability to measure air pressure. The
pitot heat switch, however, is not always set to ON. Although the
existing ice protection system provides indication of activation to the
flight crew, three reported incidents on Model 737 airplanes were
attributed to failure to activate the air data sensor heating system.
The affected airplanes do not have an automatic activation of the air
data sensor heating system; pilots activate the system manually as a
pretakeoff checklist item. Failure to activate the air data sensor
heating system could result in ice formation on air data system
sensors, which could lead to misleading airspeed data or loss of all
airspeed indicating systems, and loss of control of the airplane.

Relevant Service Information

   We reviewed Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 737-30A1063, dated
November 16, 2011. This service bulletin describes procedures for
modifying the anti-icing system for the angle of attack sensor, the
total air temperature, and the pitot probes. The modification involves
the following:
    Changing the wires and replacing the P5-9 window/pitot
heat module on the P5 overhead panel in the flight compartment (the
modified P5-9 window/pitot heat module changes the current ON and OFF
positions of the pitot heat switch to ON and AUTO);
    Replacing two circuit breakers; installing relay supports,
relays, and decals; and changing wiring at the P18 circuit breaker
panels in the flight compartment; and
    Changing the wiring at the E2-2 and E3-1 electronics
shelves in the electrical/electronics compartment.
   These modifications to the air data sensor heating system provide
automatic activation of the heating system when the modified pitot heat
switch is set to AUTO and either engine is running.

FAA's Determination

   We are proposing this AD because we evaluated all the relevant
information and determined the unsafe condition described previously is
likely to exist or develop in other products of the same type design.

Proposed AD Requirements

   This proposed AD would require accomplishing the actions specified
in the service information described previously.

Costs of Compliance

   We estimate that this proposed AD affects 1,025 airplanes of U.S.
registry. We estimate the following costs to comply with this proposed
AD:

                                                Estimated Costs
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                 Cost on U.S.
            Action                    Labor cost            Parts cost      Cost per product      operators
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Modification...................  60 to 79 work-hours x   $4,991 to $7,506.  Up to $14,221....  Up to
                                 $85 per hour = $5,100                                         $14,576,525.
                                 to $6,715.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Authority for This Rulemaking

   Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's authority to
issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the
authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII: Aviation Programs,
describes in more detail the scope of the Agency's authority.
   We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in
Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701: ``General
requirements.'' Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with
promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing
regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator
finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within
the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition
that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this
rulemaking action.

Regulatory Findings

   We determined that this proposed AD would not have federalism
implications under Executive Order 13132. This proposed AD would not
have a substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship
between the national Government and the States, or on the distribution
of power and responsibilities among the various levels of government.

[[Page 11791]]

   For the reasons discussed above, I certify this proposed
regulation:
   (1) Is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under Executive
Order 12866,
   (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies
and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979),
   (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and
   (4) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or
negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria
of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39

   Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by
reference, Safety.

The Proposed Amendment

   Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the
Administrator, the FAA proposes to amend 14 CFR part 39 as follows:

PART 39--AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES

   1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows:

   Authority:  49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701.


Sec.  39.13  [Amended]

   2. The FAA amends Sec.  39.13 by adding the following new
airworthiness directive (AD):

The Boeing Company: Docket No. FAA-2012-0186; Directorate Identifier
2011-NM-268-AD.

(a) Comments Due Date

   We must receive comments by April 13, 2012.

(b) Affected ADs

   None.

(c) Applicability

   This AD applies to The Boeing Company Model 737-600, -700, -
700C, -800, -900, and -900ER series airplanes; certificated in any
category; as identified in Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 737-
30A1063, dated November 16, 2011.

(d) Subject

   Joint Aircraft System Component (JASC)/Air Transport Association
(ATA) of America Code 3030, Pitot/Static Anti-Ice System.

(e) Unsafe Condition

   This AD was prompted by reports of flight crew failure to
activate air data probe heat. We are issuing this AD to prevent ice
from forming on air data system sensors and consequent loss of or
misleading airspeed indication on all airspeed indicating systems,
which could lead to loss of control of the airplane.

(f) Compliance

   Comply with this AD within the compliance times specified,
unless already done.

(g) Modification

   Within 24 months after the effective date of this AD: modify the
anti-icing system for the angle of attack sensor, the total air
temperature, and the pitot probes, in accordance with the
Accomplishment Instructions of Boeing Alert Service Bulletin 737-
30A1063, dated November 16, 2011.

(h) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs)

   (1) The Manager, Seattle Aircraft Certification Office (ACO),
FAA, has the authority to approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested
using the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. In accordance with 14
CFR 39.19, send your request to your principal inspector or local
Flight Standards District Office, as appropriate. If sending
information directly to the manager of the ACO, send it to the
attention of the person identified in the Related Information
section of this AD. Information may be emailed to: 9-ANM-Seattle-ACO-AMOC-Requests@faa.gov.
   (2) Before using any approved AMOC, notify your appropriate
principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager
of the local flight standards district office/certificate holding
district office.

(i) Related Information

   (1) For more information about this AD, contact Frank Carreras,
Aerospace Engineer, Systems and Equipment Branch, ANM-130S, FAA,
Seattle Aircraft Certification Office (ACO), 1601 Lind Avenue SW.,
Renton, Washington 98057-3356; phone: 425-917-6442; fax: 425-917-
6590; email: frank.carreras@faa.gov.
   (2) For service information identified in this AD, contact
Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Attention: Data & Services Management,
P.O. Box 3707, MC 2H-65, Seattle, Washington 98124-2207; telephone
206-544-5000, extension 1; fax 206-766-5680; email
me.boecom@boeing.com; Internet https://www.myboeingfleet.com. You
may review copies of the referenced service information at the FAA,
Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton,
Washington. For information on the availability of this material at
the FAA, call 425-227-1221.

   Issued in Renton, Washington, on February 10, 2012.
Kalene C. Yanamura,
  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

Boeing has celebrated a major achievement in the effort to create a Queen of the Skies for the 21st Century, delivering the first 747-8 Intercontinental VIP airplane to an undisclosed customer.

The airplane, which was delivered with a minimal interior, will enter service in 2014 after its VIP interior is installed.

“This is a great day for Boeing,” said Jim Albaugh, president and chief executive of Boeing Commercial Airplanes.

“The 747 is the most iconic airplane in the world, and I know customers are going to love what we’ve done to enhance its performance.

“The Intercontinental is fast, efficient and quiet, offering real savings and a great flying experience.

“And I believe it’s one of the most beautiful airplanes in the sky.”

The VIP version of the 747-8 Intercontinental provides a cabin with 4,786 square feet.

This 747-8 VIP will include Greenpoint Technologies’ Aeroloft, located above the main cabin between the upper deck and tail of the 747-8 VIP, giving the airplane 393 square feet of additional cabin space. 

The Aeroloft will be installed by Boeing Global Transport & Executive Systems (GTES) in Wichita, Kan.

With Aeroloft, the VIP-configured 747-8 offers a total of 5,179 square feet of cabin space, can carry 100 passengers and has a range of about 8,840 nautical miles.

It provides double-digit improvements in fuel burn and emissions over the 747-400, and is 30 per cent quieter.

With a normal cruise speed of Mach 0.86, it is the fastest large commercial jet.

The 747-8 VIP jet is the only large airplane in its class that fits today’s airport infrastructure, giving its owners the flexibility to fly to more destinations.

Building on the current 747’s capability to fly into most airports worldwide, the 747-8 VIP uses the same pilot type ratings, services and most ground support equipment.

To date, undisclosed customers have ordered nine 747-8 VIP airplanes.

 
  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2010-1311; Directorate Identifier 2009-NM-229-AD;
Amendment 39-16938; AD 2012-02-15]
RIN 2120-AA64


Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We are superseding an existing airworthiness directive (AD)
for certain Model 757-200, -200PF, -200CB, and -300 series airplanes.
That AD currently requires inspecting certain power feeder wire bundles
for damage, inspecting the support clamps for these wire bundles to
determine whether the clamps are properly installed, and performing
corrective actions if necessary. This new AD requires additional
inspections for certain airplanes. This AD was prompted by a report
that a power feeder wire bundle chafed against the number six auxiliary
slat track, causing electrical wires in the bundle to arc, which
damaged both the auxiliary slat track and power feeder wires. We are
issuing this AD to prevent arcing that could be a possible ignition
source for leaked flammable fluids, which could result in a fire.
Arcing could also result in a loss of power from the generator
connected to the power feeder wire bundle, and consequent loss of
systems, which could reduce controllability of the airplane.

DATES: This AD is effective April 4, 2012.
   The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by
reference of certain publications listed in the AD as of April 4, 2012.

ADDRESSES: For service information identified in this AD, contact
Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Attention: Data & Services Management,
P.O. Box 3707, MC 2H-65, Seattle, Washington 98124-2207; telephone 206-
544-5000, extension 1; fax 206-766-5680; email me.boecom@boeing.com;
Internet https://www.myboeingfleet.com. You may review copies of the
referenced service information at the FAA, Transport Airplane
Directorate, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, Washington. For information
on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 425-227-1221.

Examining the AD Docket

   You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov; or in person at the Docket Management Facility
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal
holidays. The AD docket contains this AD, the regulatory evaluation,
any comments received, and other information. The address for the
Docket Office (phone: 800-647-5527) is Document Management Facility,
U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M-30, West
Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE.,
Washington, DC 20590.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Marie Hogestad, Aerospace Engineer,
Systems and Equipment Branch, ANM-130S, FAA, Seattle Aircraft
Certification Office (ACO), 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, Washington
98057-3356; phone: 425-917-6418; fax: 425-917-6590; email:
marie.hogestad@faa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Discussion

   We issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend 14 CFR
part 39 to supersede AD 2007-03-01, amendment 39-14912 (72 FR 3939,
January 29, 2007). That AD applies to the specified products. The NPRM
was published in the Federal Register on January 18, 2011 (76 FR 2848).
That NPRM proposed to continue to require inspecting certain power
feeder wire bundles for damage, inspecting the support clamps for those
wire bundles to determine whether the clamps are properly installed,
and performing corrective actions if necessary. That NPRM also proposed
to require additional inspections for certain airplanes.

Comments

   We gave the public the opportunity to participate in developing
this AD. The following presents the comments received on the proposal
and the FAA's response to each comment.

Requests To Correct Figure Reference in Paragraph (i) of the NPRM (76
FR 2848, January 18, 2011)

   United Airlines and American Airlines requested that paragraph (i)
of the NPRM (76 FR 2848, January 18, 2011) be changed to reference
Figure 1 rather than Figure 3 of Boeing Special Attention Service
Bulletin 757-24-0105, Revision 5, dated July 30, 2009. Boeing Special
Attention Service Bulletin 757-24-0105, Revision 5, dated July 30,
2009, has a typographical error referencing the incorrect figure.
United Airlines also requested that the NPRM refer to Boeing
Information Notice 757-24-0105 IN 03, dated August 19, 2009. United
Airlines stated that Boeing Information Notice 757-24-0105 IN 03, dated
August 19, 2009, was issued to notify operators of this error.
   We agree to revise paragraph (i) of this AD to refer to Figure 1 of
Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 757-24-0105, Revision 5,
dated July 30, 2009. We have confirmed that the correct figure is
Figure 1; therefore, we have revised paragraph (i) of this AD to refer
to Figure 1 of Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 757-24-0105,
Revision 5, dated July 30, 2009. We have not revised paragraph (i) of
this AD to refer to Boeing Information Notice 757-24-0105 IN 03, dated
August 19, 2009, because we revised that paragraph to refer to the
correct figure.

Request To Add Inspection To Determine Airplane Configuration

   American Airlines requested that the NPRM (76 FR 2848, January 18,
2011) be revised to include an inspection to determine if the airplane
has one or two attach brackets on the left wing prior to accomplishing
the required rework. American Airlines stated that Group 2 airplanes
were moved to Group 1 in Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 757-
24-0105, Revision 5, dated July 30, 2009, because some airplanes have
two attach brackets on the left wing, similar to earlier Group 1
airplanes identified in previous revisions of that service bulletin.
American Airlines stated that the NPRM does not contain a step to
determine the airplane configuration before the rework.
   We disagree with adding an inspection to determine the airplane
configuration; however, we agree to clarify paragraph (i) of this AD.
Therefore, we have revised paragraph (i) of this AD to specify the
affected airplanes on which the actions are required by that paragraph.

Request To Clarify Affected Airplanes in Paragraph (i) of the NPRM (76
FR 2848, January 18, 2011)

   United Airlines requested that a statement be added to clarify that
the new requirement specified in paragraph (i) of the NPRM (76 FR 2848,
January 18, 2011) is only applicable to airplanes with upper and lower
brackets installed in the left wing (Group 1, Configuration 1
airplanes), as defined in Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin
757-24-0105, Revision 5, dated July 30, 2009. United Airlines stated
that the NPRM is unclear regarding which

[[Page 12167]]

airplanes are affected by the new requirements.
   We agree that clarification is needed. Airplanes in Group 1, as
specified in Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 757-24-0105,
Revision 5, dated July 30, 2009, could be in the configuration shown in
Figure 1 (Configuration 1 with two attach brackets on the left wing) or
Figure 3 (Configuration 2 with one attach bracket on the left wing).
Therefore, as stated previously, we have clarified paragraph (i) of
this AD to specify the affected airplanes.

Request To Provide Credit for Previous Work Done Using Boeing Special
Attention Service Bulletin 757-24-0105, Revision 5, Dated July 30, 2009

   European Air Transport, a company of DHL, requested that we revise
the NPRM (76 FR 2848, January 18, 2011) to provide credit to operators
that have accomplished inspections and corrective actions prior to the
effective date of this AD in accordance with Boeing Special Attention
Service Bulletin 757-24-0105, Revision 5, dated July 30, 2009. European
Air Transport pointed out that the NPRM provides credit for actions
accomplished using previous revisions of Boeing Special Attention
Service Bulletin 757-24-0106, which is applicable to Model 757-300
airplanes.
   We agree that inspections and corrective actions done before the
effective date of this AD in accordance with Boeing Special Attention
Service Bulletin 757-24-0105, Revision 5, dated July 30, 2009, are
acceptable for accomplishing the applicable actions specified in this
AD. However, operators may always accomplish the actions in an AD using
the required service information at any time before the effective date
of the AD, as allowed by the phrase ``unless the actions have already
been done.'' Therefore, because these actions are not required to be
repeated, it is unnecessary to provide specific credit for these
actions. We have made no change to the AD in this regard.

Additional Changes to Final Rule

   We have revised the headings of Tables 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 of this AD
to clarify the purpose of the content in those tables.
   We have included headings for paragraphs (i) and (j) of this AD to
clarify the purpose of the content in those paragraphs.
   Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 757-24-0105, Revision 3,
dated October 3, 2006; and Revision 4, dated January 4, 2008; have been
added to Table 5, ``Previous Service Information for Paragraph (g) of
this AD,'' of this AD.
   We have also revised the headings for and wording in paragraphs (h)
and (k) of this AD; these changes have not changed the intent of these
paragraphs.

Conclusion

   We reviewed the relevant data, considered the comments received,
and determined that air safety and the public interest require adopting
the AD with the changes described previously and minor editorial
changes. We have determined that these minor changes:
    Are consistent with the intent that was proposed in the
NPRM (76 FR 2848, January 18, 2011) for correcting the unsafe
condition; and
    Do not add any additional burden upon the public than was
already proposed in the NPRM (76 FR 2848, January 18, 2011).
   We also determined that these changes will not increase the
economic burden on any operator or increase the scope of the AD.

Costs of Compliance

   We estimate that this AD affects 683 airplanes of U.S. registry.
   We estimate the following costs to comply with this AD:

                                                Estimated Costs
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                          Average
                                 Work      labor                   Cost per     Number of U.S.-
           Action               hours     rate per    Parts        airplane       registered       Fleet cost
                                            hour                                   airplanes
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Inspection (required by AD             2        $85         $0  $170 per                    683  $116,110 per
2007-03-01, Amendment 39-                                       inspection                       inspection
14912 (72 FR 3939, January                                      cycle.                           cycle.
29, 2007)).
Inspection for certain Group           5         85          0  $425 per                    646  $274,550 per
1 Model 757-200, -200CB, -                                      inspection                       inspection
200PF series airplanes (new                                     cycle.                           cycle.
action).
Inspections for Model 757-300          4         85          0  $340 per                     37  $12,580 per
series airplanes (new                                           inspection                       inspection
action).                                                        cycle.                           cycle.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

   We have received no definitive data that would enable us to provide
a cost estimate for the on-condition actions specified in this AD.

Authority for This Rulemaking

   Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's authority to
issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, Section 106, describes the
authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII, Aviation Programs,
describes in more detail the scope of the Agency's authority.
   We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in
Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701, ``General
requirements.'' Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with
promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing
regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator
finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within
the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition
that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this
rulemaking action.

Regulatory Findings

   We have determined that this AD will not have federalism
implications under Executive Order 13132. This AD will not have a
substantial direct effect on the States, on the relationship between
the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power
and responsibilities among the various levels of government.
   For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD:
   (1) Is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under Executive
Order 12866,

[[Page 12168]]

   (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and
Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979),
   (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and
   (4) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or
negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria
of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39

   Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by
reference, Safety.

Adoption of the Amendment

   Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the
Administrator, the FAA amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows:

PART 39--AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES

0
1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows:

   Authority:  49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701.


Sec.  39.13  [Amended]

0
2. The FAA amends Sec.  39.13 by removing airworthiness directive (AD)
2007-03-01, Amendment 39-14912 (72 FR 3939, January 29, 2007), and
adding the following new AD:

2012-02-15 The Boeing Company: Amendment 39-16938; Docket No. FAA-
2010-1311; Directorate Identifier 2009-NM-229-AD.

(a) Effective Date

   This airworthiness directive (AD) is effective April 4, 2012.

(b) Affected ADs

   This AD supersedes AD 2007-03-01, Amendment 39-14912 (72 FR
3939, January 29, 2007).

(c) Applicability

   This AD applies to The Boeing Company Model 757-200, -200PF, -
200CB, and -300 series airplanes, certificated in any category,
specified in paragraphs (c)(1) and (c)(2) of this AD.
   (1) Model 757-200, -200PF, and -200CB series airplanes, as
identified in Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 757-24-0105,
Revision 5, dated July 30, 2009.
   (2) Model 757-300 series airplanes, as identified in Boeing
Special Attention Service Bulletin 757-24-0106, Revision 5, dated
July 30, 2009.

(d) Subject

   Air Transport Association (ATA) of America Code 24: Electrical
power.

(e) Unsafe Condition

   This AD results from a report that a power feeder wire bundle
chafed against the number six auxiliary slat track, causing
electrical wires in the bundle to arc, which damaged both the
auxiliary slat track and power feeder wires. The Federal Aviation
Administration is issuing this AD to prevent arcing that could be a
possible ignition source for leaked flammable fluids, which could
result in a fire. Arcing could also result in a loss of power from
the generator connected to the power feeder wire bundle, and
consequent loss of systems, which could reduce controllability of
the airplane.

(f) Compliance

   You are responsible for having the actions required by this AD
performed within the compliance times specified, unless the actions
have already been done.

(g) Restatement of Requirements of AD 2007-03-01, Amendment 39-14912
(72 FR 3939, January 29, 2007), With Revised Service Information and
Affected Airplane Groups: One-Time Inspections and Corrective Actions

   For Model 757-200, -200PF, and -200CB series airplanes
identified in Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 757-24-0105,
Revision 5, dated July 30, 2009; and for Model 757-300 series
airplanes identified as Group 1 airplanes in Boeing Special
Attention Service Bulletin 757-24-0106, Revision 5, dated July 30,
2009: Within 24 months after March 5, 2007 (the effective date for
AD 2007-03-01, Amendment 39-14912 (72 FR 3939, January 29, 2007)),
perform a general visual inspection for damage (including but not
limited to chafing) of power feeder wire bundles W3312 and W3412 at
front spar station 148.90 in the left and right wings, and a general
visual inspection of the support clamps for those power feeder wire
bundles to determine whether the clamps are properly installed, and,
before further flight, do all applicable corrective actions. Do
these actions by doing all of the applicable actions in accordance
with the Accomplishment Instructions of the applicable service
bulletin identified in Table 1 of this AD. After the effective date
of this AD, only Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 757-24-
0105, Revision 5, dated July 30, 2009 (for Model 757-200, -200CB,
and -200PF series airplanes); or Boeing Special Attention Service
Bulletin 757-24-0106, Revision 5, dated July 30, 2009 (for Model
757-300 series airplanes); may be used.

                     Table 1--Acceptable Service Information for Paragraph (g) of This AD
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                          Boeing Special
                                             Attention
                Model--                       Service        Revision--                   Dated--
                                            Bulletin--
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
757-200, -200CB, and -200PF series             757-24-0105               2  April 20, 2006.
airplanes.
757-200, -200CB, and -200PF series             757-24-0105               5  July 30, 2009.
airplanes.
757-300 series airplanes................       757-24-0106               2  April 20, 2006.
757-300 series airplanes................       757-24-0106               5  July 30, 2009.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

(h) Restatement of Requirements of AD 2007-03-01, Amendment 39-14912
(72 FR 3939, January 29, 2007): Credit for Previous Actions

   This paragraph provides credit for inspections and corrective
actions, as required by paragraph (g) of this AD, if those actions
were performed before March 5, 2007 (the effective date for AD 2007-
03-01, Amendment 39-14912 (72 FR 3939, January 29, 2007)), using the
service information listed in Table 2 of this AD.

     Table 2--Other Acceptable Service Information for Previously
           Accomplished Actions in Paragraph (g) of This AD
------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Boeing Special Attention
     Service Bulletin--         Revision--             Dated--
------------------------------------------------------------------------
757-24-0105..................  ..............  September 30, 2004.
757-24-0105..................               1  June 23, 2005.
757-24-0106..................  ..............  September 30, 2004.
757-24-0106..................               1  June 23, 2005.
------------------------------------------------------------------------


[[Page 12169]]

(i) New Requirements of This AD: Additional Work for Model 757-200, -
200CB, and -200PF Series Airplanes Identified in Boeing Special
Attention Service Bulletin 757-24-0105, Revision 5, Dated July 30, 2009

   For Model 757-200, -200CB, and -200PF series airplanes
identified as Group 1, Configuration 1 airplanes, in Boeing Special
Attention Service Bulletin 757-24-0105, Revision 5, dated July 30,
2009, on which inspections have been done before the effective date
of this AD in accordance with any service bulletin specified in
Table 3 of this AD: Within 24 months after the effective date of
this AD, do a general visual inspection to determine if the clamp is
installed on the lower bracket on the left wing, in accordance with
Figure 1 of Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 757-24-0105,
Revision 5, dated July 30, 2009. If the clamp is missing, before
further flight, install a clamp on the lower bracket on the left
wing, in accordance with Figure 1 of Boeing Special Attention
Service Bulletin 757-24-0105, Revision 5, dated July 30, 2009.

 Table 3--Service Information for Previously Accomplished Actions for
          Model 757-200, -200CB, and -200PF Series Airplanes
------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Boeing Special Attention
     Service Bulletin--         Revision--             Dated--
------------------------------------------------------------------------
757-24-0105..................  ..............  September 30, 2004.
757-24-0105..................               1  June 23, 2005.
757-24-0105..................               2  April 20, 2006.
757-24-0105..................               3  October 3, 2006.
757-24-0105..................               4  January 4, 2008.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

(j) New Requirements of This AD: Additional Work for Model 757-300
Series Airplanes Identified in Boeing Special Attention Service
Bulletin 757-24-0106, Revision 5, Dated July 30, 2009

   For Model 757-300 series airplanes in Group 2, as identified in
Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 757-24-0106, Revision 5,
dated July 30, 2009: Within 24 months after the effective date of
this AD, perform a general visual inspection for damage (including,
but not limited to chafing) of power feeder wire bundles W5784 and
W5786 at front spar station 148.90 in the left and right wings, and
a general visual inspection of the support clamps for those power
feeder wire bundles to determine if the clamps are properly
installed, and, before further flight, do all applicable corrective
actions. Do all applicable actions in accordance with the
Accomplishment Instructions of Boeing Special Attention Service
Bulletin 757-24-0106, Revision 5, dated July 30, 2009.

(k) New Requirements of This AD: Credit for Previous Actions

   (1) This paragraph provides credit for inspections and
corrective actions, as required by paragraph (j) of this AD, if
those actions were performed before the effective date of this AD
using Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 757-24-0106,
Revision 4, dated January 4, 2008.
   (2) This paragraph provides credit for inspections and
corrective actions, as required by paragraph (j) of this AD, if
those actions were performed before the effective date of this AD
using the service information listed in table 4 of this, provided
that power feeder wire bundles W5784 and W5786 were inspected and
all applicable correction actions were done.

  Table 4--Previous Service Information for Paragraph (j) of This AD
------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Boeing Special Attention
     Service Bulletin--         Revision--             Dated--
------------------------------------------------------------------------
757-24-0106..................  ..............  September 30, 2004.
757-24-0106..................               1  June 23, 2005.
757-24-0106..................               2  April 20, 2006.
757-24-0106..................               3  October 3, 2006.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

   (3) This paragraph provides credit for inspections and
corrective actions, as required by paragraph (g) of this AD, if
those actions were performed before the effective date of this AD
using the service information listed in table 5 of this AD.

  Table 5--Previous Service Information for Paragraph (g) of This AD
------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Boeing Special Attention
     Service Bulletin--         Revision--             Dated--
------------------------------------------------------------------------
757-24-0105..................               3  October 3, 2006.
757-24-0105..................               4  January 4, 2008.
757-24-0106..................               3  October 3, 2006.
757-24-0106..................               4  January 4, 2008.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

(l) Special Flight Permit

   Special flight permits may be issued in accordance with sections
21.197 and 21.199 of the Federal Aviation Regulations (14 CFR 21.197
and 21.199) to operate the airplane to a location where the
requirements of this AD can be accomplished, provided that the
generator served by the power feeder wire bundles specified in
paragraph (g) or (j) of this AD, as applicable, is disconnected.

(m) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs)

   (1) The Manager, Seattle Aircraft Certification Office (ACO),
FAA, has the authority to approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested
using the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. In accordance with 14
CFR 39.19, send your request to your principal inspector or local
Flight Standards District Office, as appropriate. If sending
information directly to the manager of the ACO, send it to the
attention of the person identified in the Related Information
section of this AD. Information may be emailed to: 9-ANM-Seattle-ACO-AMOC-Requests@faa.gov.
   (2) Before using any approved AMOC, notify your appropriate
principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager
of the local flight standards district office/certificate holding
district office.
   (3) AMOCs approved previously in accordance with AD 2007-03-01,
Amendment 39-14912 (72 FR 3939, January 29, 2007), are approved as
AMOCs for the corresponding provisions of paragraph (g) of this AD.

[[Page 12170]]

(n) Related Information

   For more information about this AD, contact Marie Hogestad,
Aerospace Engineer, Systems and Equipment Branch, ANM-130S, FAA,
Seattle Aircraft Certification Office (ACO), 1601 Lind Avenue SW.,
Renton, Washington 98057-3356; phone: 425-917-6418; fax: 425-917-
6590; email: marie.hogestad@faa.gov.

(o) Material Incorporated by Reference

   (1) You must use the following service information to do the
actions required by this AD, unless the AD specifies otherwise. The
Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by
reference (IBR) under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51 of the
following service information on the date specified:
   (i) Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 757-24-0105,
Revision 5, dated July 30, 2009, approved for IBR April 4, 2012.
   (ii) Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 757-24-0106,
Revision 5, dated July 30, 2009, approved for IBR April 4, 2012.
   (2) For service information identified in this AD, contact
Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Attention: Data & Services Management,
P.O. Box 3707, MC 2H-65, Seattle, Washington 98124-2207; phone: 206-
544-5000, extension 1; fax: 206-766-5680; email:
me.boecom@boeing.com; Internet https://www.myboeingfleet.com.
   (3) You may review copies of the service information at the FAA,
Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton,
Washington. For information on the availability of this material at
the FAA, call 425-227-1221.
   (4) You may also review copies of the service information that
is incorporated by reference at the National Archives and Records
Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this
material at an NARA facility, call 202-741-6030, or go to http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html.


   Issued in Renton, Washington, on January 18, 2012.
Kalene C. Yanamura,
  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 39

[Docket No. FAA-2010-0030; Directorate Identifier 2009-NM-135-AD;
Amendment 39-16940; AD 2012-02-17]
RIN 2120-AA64


Airworthiness Directives; The Boeing Company Airplanes

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT.

ACTION: Final rule.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all
Model 757 airplanes. This AD was prompted reports that several
operators have found cracking in the front spar lower chord at the
fastener locations common to the side link support fitting at wing
station (WS) 292. This AD requires repetitive inspections for corrosion
and cracking in this area, and corrective actions if necessary. We are
issuing this AD to detect and correct such corrosion and cracking,
which, if not corrected, could grow and result in structural failure of
the spar.

DATES: This AD is effective April 4, 2012.
   The Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by
reference of a certain publication listed in the AD as of April 4,
2012.

ADDRESSES: For service information identified in this AD, contact
Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Attention: Data & Services Management,
P.O. Box 3707, MC 2H-65, Seattle, Washington 98124-2207; telephone 206-
544-5000, extension 1; fax 206-766-5680; email me.boecom@boeing.com;
Internet https://www.myboeingfleet.com. You may review copies of the
referenced service information at the FAA, Transport Airplane
Directorate, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, Washington. For information
on the availability of this material at the FAA, call 425-227-1221.

Examining the AD Docket

   You may examine the AD docket on the Internet at http://www.regulations.gov; or in person at the Docket Management Facility
between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, except Federal
holidays. The AD docket contains this AD, the regulatory evaluation,
any comments received, and other information. The address for the
Docket Office (phone: 800-647-5527) is Document Management Facility,
U.S. Department of Transportation, Docket Operations, M-30, West
Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE.,
Washington, DC 20590.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Nancy Marsh, Aerospace Engineer,
Airframe Branch, ANM-120S, FAA, Seattle Aircraft Certification Office,
1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton, Washington 98057-3356; phone: 425-917-
6440; fax: 425-917-6590; email: nancy.marsh@faa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Discussion

   We issued a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to amend 14 CFR
part 39 to include an airworthiness directive (AD) that would apply to
the specified products. That NPRM published in the Federal Register on
January 22, 2010 (75 FR 3660). That NPRM proposed to require repetitive
inspections for corrosion and cracking in the front spar lower chord at
the fastener locations common to the side link support fitting at wing
station (WS) 292, and corrective actions if necessary.

Actions Since Issuance of NPRM (75 FR 3660, January 22, 2010)

   The NPRM (75 FR 3660, January 22, 2010) referred to Boeing Special
Attention Service Bulletin 757-57-0065, dated May 14, 2009, as the
appropriate source of service information for accomplishing the
actions. Since issuance of the NPRM, Boeing has issued Special
Attention Service Bulletin 757-57-0065, Revision 1, dated August 1,
2011. No more work is necessary for airplanes on which the original
issue was used to accomplish the actions. Certain procedures specified
in Revision 1 of this service bulletin have been clarified to provide
additional instructions.
   We have revised this AD to refer to Boeing Special Attention
Service Bulletin 757-57-0065, Revision 1, dated August 1, 2011, as the
appropriate source of service information for accomplishing the
actions. In addition, we added a new paragraph (i) to this AD (and
reidentified subsequent paragraphs accordingly) to give credit for
using Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 757-57-0065, dated May
14, 2009, for accomplishing the actions.

Comments

   We gave the public the opportunity to participate in developing
this AD. The following presents the comments received on the proposal
and the FAA's response to each comment.

Supportive Comment

   Boeing concurred with the content of the NPRM (75 FR 3660, January
22, 2010).

Request To Include Instructions for Airplanes With Unmodified
Configurations at the Side Link Fitting

   FedEx stated that Figures 2 and 3 of the Boeing Special Attention
Service Bulletin 757-57-0065, dated May 14, 2009, show a configuration
of the airplane with the modification of the side link fitting
accomplished. FedEx added that the procedures in that service
information replace the side link

[[Page 12171]]

fitting and install additional fasteners attaching the fitting to the
lower chord. FedEx noted that it is possible to perform the proposed
inspections prior to incorporation of the service information; however,
for airplanes on which the configuration may not match that provided in
the service information, and on which the inspection has not been
accomplished, the inspection steps provided may not match the
configuration.
   We agree that Figures 2 and 3 of Boeing Special Attention Service
Bulletin 757-57-0065, dated May 14, 2009, do not include diagrams of
different configurations of the side link fitting for airplanes that
may currently be in service. However, as specified under ``Actions
Since Issuance of NPRM,'' (75 FR 3660, January 22, 2010) Boeing has
issued Special Attention Service Bulletin 757-57-0065, Revision 1,
dated August 1, 2011, which clarifies the steps in those figures. In
addition, the number of fastener locations specified in the figures was
incorrect and they now identify either three or four fastener
locations; therefore, we have removed the number ``four'' preceding the
phrase ``fastener locations'' throughout this AD.

Request To Include FAA-Approved Repair Data

   Continental Airlines (CAL) asked that the NPRM (75 FR 3660, January
22, 2010) include a requirement that any repairs must be approved
either by the aircraft certification office (ACO) or an FAA-authorized
Boeing Organization Designation Authority (ODA) using data that meets
the certification basis of the airplane. FedEx stated that if cracks
and corrosion are found, the airplane must be repaired prior to further
flight; however, the NPRM and the referenced service information do not
give repair instructions. FedEx asked that repair instructions be
included in or referred to in the proposed AD requirements. FedEx also
noted that in the event of findings, Boeing must be contacted for a
repair prior to further flight. CAL also stated that if any corrosion
or cracking is found, it is required to submit damage data to Boeing
and await disposition and proper approval before accomplishing the
repair and releasing the airplane. CAL added that this has the
possibility of grounding airplanes beyond an acceptable time for
operational requirements while the repair parts are obtained.
   We agree that if repair data were available as part of the service
information, it would allow a quicker return to service for airplanes
on which damage is found during the inspections. However, at this time
the repair data are not currently available; therefore, the data cannot
be included in the AD. We have made no change to the AD in this regard.

Request To Include Repair and Corrosion Limitations

   CAL stated that the referenced service information does not include
any specified limits for the repair, and added that corrosion
limitations and related actions should be included for existing
approved crack repairs. CAL noted that Boeing Special Attention Service
Bulletin 757-57-0065, dated May 14, 2009, states that several repairs
have been accomplished addressing crack lengths to 0.080 inch, and the
service history table in the Background section of this service
information lists six instances of cracking with pre-existing, pre-
approved repairs from Boeing. CAL added that all but one reported
instance included oversizing of the discrepant holes and freeze plug
installation. CAL believes that these existing repairs should be
included either in the service information or the structural repair
manual, and subsequently added as repair actions in the proposed AD
prior to issuance.
   We do not agree that the corrosion limitations and related actions
should be included in this AD for existing approved crack repairs.
Boeing maintains information related to pre-existing, pre-approved
repairs. We have delegated authority to make findings concerning
repairs related to this AD to the Boeing Commercial Airplanes ODA.
Under the provisions of paragraph (j) of this AD, we will consider
requests to accept the use of standard repairs developed by Boeing or
the operator if sufficient data are submitted to substantiate that the
repair would provide an acceptable level of safety. We have made no
change to the AD in this regard.

Request To Extend Compliance Time

   European Air Transport and DHL asked that we extend the interval
for the repetitive inspections in the NPRM (75 FR 3660, January 22,
2010) to the next 4C check or 12,000 flight cycles from the date of the
referenced service information, whichever occurs first. These
commenters stated that they are already performing the inspection at
the next 4C check and at intervals of 12,000 flight cycles. These
commenters added that the fuel tanks are only purged during a 4C check,
which has an interval of 12,000 flight cycles, 24,000 flight hours, and
72 months, whichever occurs first. The commenters noted that, if the
proposed interval is maintained, the fuel tanks will need to be purged
during a 1C or 2C check, and this will create additional downtime and
costs for the inspection.
   We do not agree with the commenters' request. The repetitive
inspection interval was determined using a damage tolerance analysis
and is appropriate to adequately address the unsafe condition. Under
the provisions of paragraph (j) of this AD, operators may request
approval of an alternative method of compliance (AMOC) if sufficient
data are submitted to substantiate that the request would provide an
acceptable level of safety. We have not changed the AD in this regard.

Request To Supersede Related ADs

   FedEx asked that we supersede related AD 2003-18-05, Amendment 39-
13296 (68 FR 53496, September 11, 2003); and AD 2004-12-07, Amendment
39-13666 (69 FR 33561, June 16, 2004). FedEx stated that the NPRM (75
FR 3660, January 22, 2010) should be approved as ancillary inspections
to these ADs. FedEx added that this would maintain current AD
maintenance documents and prevent future misinterpretation of the AD
modification and inspection requirements.
   We agree that the subject inspections are in the same area as the
modifications required by AD 2003-18-05 (68 FR 53496, September 11,
2003) and AD 2004-12-07 (69 FR 33561, June 16, 2004). We also agree
that accomplishing the inspections required by this AD could be cited
as related actions to the actions included in AD 2003-18-05 and AD
2004-12-07. In the event that those ADs are superseded, this AD could
be included as related rulemaking.
   The actions required by those ADs (mandating strut modifications)
are complex and require compliance times which would not correlate with
the compliance times in this AD. Therefore, we do not agree that this
AD should supersede AD 2003-18-05 (68 FR 53496, September 11, 2003) and
AD 2004-12-07 (69 FR 33561, June 16, 2004). We have not changed the AD
in this regard.

Additional Change Made to This Final Rule

   We have revised the heading for and wording in paragraph (i) of
this AD; this change has not changed the intent of that paragraph.

Conclusion

   We reviewed the relevant data, considered the comments received,
and determined that air safety and the

[[Page 12172]]

public interest require adopting the AD with the changes described
previously--and minor editorial changes. We have determined that these
minor changes:
    Are consistent with the intent that was proposed in the
NPRM (75 FR 3660, January 22, 2010) for correcting the unsafe
condition; and
    Do not add any additional burden upon the public than was
already proposed in the NPRM (75 FR 3660, January 22, 2010).
   We also determined that these changes will not increase the
economic burden on any operator or increase the scope of the AD.

Explanation of Change to Costs of Compliance

   Since issuance of the NPRM (75 FR 3660, January 22, 2010), we have
increased the labor rate used in the Costs of Compliance from $80 per
work-hour to $85 per work-hour. The Costs of Compliance information,
below, reflects this increase in the specified labor rate.

Costs of Compliance

   We estimate that this AD affects 668 airplanes of U.S. registry. We
also estimate that it will take about 6 work-hours per airplane to
comply with this AD. The average labor rate is $85 per work-hour. Based
on these figures, we estimate the cost of this AD to the U.S. operators
to be $340,680 per inspection cycle, or $510 per airplane, per
inspection cycle.

Authority for This Rulemaking

   Title 49 of the United States Code specifies the FAA's authority to
issue rules on aviation safety. Subtitle I, section 106, describes the
authority of the FAA Administrator. Subtitle VII: Aviation Programs,
describes in more detail the scope of the Agency's authority.
   We are issuing this rulemaking under the authority described in
Subtitle VII, Part A, Subpart III, Section 44701: ``General
Requirements.'' Under that section, Congress charges the FAA with
promoting safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce by prescribing
regulations for practices, methods, and procedures the Administrator
finds necessary for safety in air commerce. This regulation is within
the scope of that authority because it addresses an unsafe condition
that is likely to exist or develop on products identified in this
rulemaking action.

Regulatory Findings

   This AD will not have federalism implications under Executive Order
13132. This AD will not have a substantial direct effect on the States,
on the relationship between the national government and the States, or
on the distribution of power and responsibilities among the various
levels of government.
   For the reasons discussed above, I certify that this AD:
   (1) Is not a ``significant regulatory action'' under Executive
Order 12866,
   (2) Is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and
Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979),
   (3) Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska, and
   (4) Will not have a significant economic impact, positive or
negative, on a substantial number of small entities under the criteria
of the Regulatory Flexibility Act.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 39

   Air transportation, Aircraft, Aviation safety, Incorporation by
reference, Safety.

Adoption of the Amendment

   Accordingly, under the authority delegated to me by the
Administrator, the FAA amends 14 CFR part 39 as follows:

PART 39--AIRWORTHINESS DIRECTIVES

0
1. The authority citation for part 39 continues to read as follows:

   Authority:  49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40113, 44701.


Sec.  39.13  [Amended]

0
2. The FAA amends Sec.  39.13 by adding the following new airworthiness
directive (AD):

2012-02-17 The Boeing Company: Amendment 39-16940; Docket No. FAA-
2010-0030; Directorate Identifier 2009-NM-135-AD.

(a) Effective Date

   This AD is effective April 4, 2012.

(b) Affected ADs

   None.

(c) Applicability

   This AD applies to all The Boeing Company Model 757-200, -200PF,
-200CB, and -300 series airplanes, certificated in any category.

(d) Subject

   Air Transport Association (ATA) of America Code 57: Wings.

(e) Unsafe Condition

   This AD results from reports of cracking at the front spar lower
chord at the fastener locations common to the side link support
fitting at wing station (WS) 292. The Federal Aviation
Administration is issuing this AD to detect and correct such
cracking and corrosion, which, if not corrected, could grow and
result in structural failure of the spar.

(f) Compliance

   You are responsible for having the actions required by this AD
performed within the compliance times specified, unless the actions
have already been done.

(g) Inspect for Cracking and Corrosion

   At the later of the times in paragraphs (g)(1) and (g)(2) of
this AD, do ultrasonic and general visual inspections for cracking
and corrosion of the front spar lower chord at the fastener
locations common to the side link support fitting at WS 292, in
accordance with the Accomplishment Instructions of Boeing Special
Attention Service Bulletin 757-57-0065, Revision 1, dated August 1,
2011. Where Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 757-57-0065,
Revision 1, dated August 1, 2011, specifies a compliance time
``after the date on this service bulletin,'' this AD requires
compliance at the specified time after the effective date of this
AD. Repeat the inspection thereafter at intervals not to exceed
12,000 flight cycles.
   (1) At the applicable time specified in paragraph 1.E.,
``Compliance,'' of Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 757-57-
0065, Revision 1, dated August 1, 2011.
   (2) Within 12,000 flight cycles after doing the modification of
the nacelle and wing structure specified in Boeing Service Bulletin
757-54-0034 or Boeing Service Bulletin 757-54-0035.

(h) Corrective Action

   If any cracking or corrosion is found during any inspection
required by this AD: Before further flight, repair the cracking or
corrosion using a method approved in accordance with the procedures
specified in paragraph (j) of this AD.

(i) Credit for Previous Actions

   This paragraph provides credit for actions required by this AD
if those actions were performed before the effective date of this AD
using Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 757-57-0065, dated
May 14, 2009.

(j) Alternative Methods of Compliance (AMOCs)

   (1) The Manager, Seattle Aircraft Certification Office (ACO),
FAA, has the authority to approve AMOCs for this AD, if requested
using the procedures found in 14 CFR 39.19. In accordance with 14
CFR 39.19, send your request to your principal inspector or local
Flight Standards District Office, as appropriate. Send information
to ATTN: Nancy Marsh, Aerospace Engineer, Airframe Branch, ANM-120S,
FAA, Seattle Aircraft Certification Office, 1601 Lind Avenue SW.,
Renton, Washington 98057-3356; phone: 425-917-6440; fax: 425-917-
6590; email: nancy.marsh@faa.gov.
   (2) Before using any approved AMOC, notify your appropriate
principal inspector, or lacking a principal inspector, the manager
of the local flight standards district office/certificate holding
district office.
   (3) An AMOC that provides an acceptable level of safety may be
used for any repair required by this AD if it is approved by the
Boeing Commercial Airplanes Organization Designation Authorization
(ODA) that has been authorized by the Manager, Seattle

[[Page 12173]]

ACO, to make those findings. For a repair method to be approved, the
repair must meet the certification basis of the airplane.

(k) Material Incorporated by Reference

   (1) You must use the following service information to do the
actions required by this AD, unless the AD specifies otherwise. The
Director of the Federal Register approved the incorporation by
reference (IBR) under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51 of the
following service information
   (i) You must use Boeing Special Attention Service Bulletin 757-
57-0065, Revision 1, dated August 1, 2011; to do the actions
required by this AD, unless the AD specifies otherwise.
   (2) For service information identified in this AD, contact
Boeing Commercial Airplanes, Attention: Data & Services Management,
P.O. Box 3707, MC 2H-65, Seattle, WA 98124-2207; telephone 206-544-
5000, extension 1; fax 206-766-5680; email me.boecom@boeing.com;
Internet https://www.myboeingfleet.com.
   (3) You may review copies of the service information at the FAA,
Transport Airplane Directorate, 1601 Lind Avenue SW., Renton,
Washington 98057-3356. For information on the availability of this
material at the FAA, call 425-227-1221.
   (4) You may also review copies of the service information that
is incorporated by reference at the National Archives and Records
Administration (NARA). For information on the availability of this
material at an NARA facility, call 202-741-6030, or go to http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html.

   Issued in Renton, Washington, on January 24, 2012.
Kalene C. Yanamura,
  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
February 29, 2012
 

The last Aerolineas Argentinas flight operated by a Boeing 747 landed today at 04.55.
 

With the arrival of flight 1133 from Madrid, Aerolineas Argentinas operated the last commercial flight using a Boeing 747, which has been part of its fleet for 33 years.
 

This morning the President of the Company, Mariano Recalde and the Operations Manager, Captain Jose’ Faggiolani welcomed the crew of the B-747 –LVAXF- who operated the last flight between Spain to Argentina.
 

Boeing 747-400 have been replaced by Airbus A-340 that are already operating international flights and destinations like Auckland/Sydney, Roma, Miami, Barcelona, Mexico, Caracas, Bogota and now Madrid which, until now, was the only route still covered by the Jumbo.
 

The Jumbo ends a cycle that marked the history of Aerolineas Argentinas starting on the 14th of January 1979, at 09.38, when the B 747-200 – registration LV-MLO- landed at Ezeiza international airport. It was the first of three aircrafts that the national Government bought directly from Boeing Co. in Seattle.
 

Aerolineas Argentinas, since 1979 up to now, enlisted 13 such aircrafts and from 1990 until January 2012 the Jumbos flew for over 500 thousand hours.
 

The B-747 was the world’s biggest commercial aircraft (until the A-380 few years ago) and Aerolineas Argentinas was the first and only Company in South America to include it in its fleet.
 

The Jumbo was the symbol of the Company and the aircraft that, on the 7th of June 1980, operated the first flight which was to link Argentina with Oceania and the Far East starting its routes to Auckland (New Zealand) and Sydney (Australia).
 

In the Eighties, the Jumbo was covering the route to Rome and it was on two occasions (June 1982 and April 1987) that the Pope John Paul II flew from Argentina to Italy.
 

The replacement of the Boeing 747 was in the Business Plan 2010/2014, presented by Aerolineas Argentinas as part of a much more cost efficient renovation and expansion of its fleet.
 

Between 2009 and 2012, Aerolineas Argentinas and Austral achieved a record number of aircraft in their fleet: fifty one aircraft in three years. They are: twenty six Boeing 737 series 700 and 800. Of those sixteen are currently operating. Twenty Embraer E-190 (which makes Austral the most modern fleet in South America) all operating. Five Airbus A-340-300, four of which are in the country.
 

Source: Aerolineas Argentinas
  Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Dublin based global aircraft lessor, AWAS, announced today that it has delivered a Boeing 737-800 passenger aircraft to Skymark Airlines. This is the first of two scheduled 737-800s to be delivered to the expanding Japanese airline this quarter.
 

“We are extremely proud to accept this 737-800 from AWAS, the 25th aircraft in our modern and growing fleet” said Mr. Shinichi Nishikubo, President/CEO of Skymark Airlines. “Skymark is also very pleased to begin a relationship with AWAS that we hope to grow with into the future as our domestic and international routes expand.”
 

This new aircraft is equipped with the Boeing Sky Interior, offering Skymark’s passengers a superior level of comfort and convenience. Ray Sisson, President CEO AWAS remarked, “Skymark’s low cost, quality service business model has allowed them to expand their reach and grow successfully. We at AWAS look forward to many years of providing them with innovative and flexible fleet solutions.”
 

This 25th passenger aircraft will contribute to the expansion of Skymark’s domestic network which will serve as a strong base for their launch of international routes planned for 2014. Skymark Airlines began service in September 1998, and today serves approximately 6 million passengers per year with a fleet of 24 aircraft. Skymark offers low fares for their 71 daily flights within a 23 route network covering Hokkaido in the north to Okinawa in the south.
 

Source: AWAS

Sponsored advertisement

Display from: