Suburban Sydney - Overhead Catenary Masts - 1930's onwards

 
  tranx Assistant Commissioner

Location: Somewhere in Southwest Sydney
In the future, I intend to model suburban Sydney and I am after the plans for the steel overhead catenary masts, that existed between the 1930's to recently.

Since Cityrail has been steadily replacing the masts with new steel masts and overhead catenary, how hard/easy is it to get plans? I have been to State Records and if its a current structure, then they automatically assume you are a terrorist (which I am not BTW) and the plans are not to be released.

If anyone could help, it would be greatly appreciated.

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  Geekboy Train Controller

Location: Banned
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  DQ2004 Chief Commissioner

Location: Hobart -where the rain has lumps in it

In the future, I intend to model suburban Sydney and I am after the plans for the steel overhead catenary masts, that existed between the 1930's to recently. Since Cityrail has been steadily replacing the masts with new steel masts and overhead catenary, how hard/easy is it to get plans? I have been to State Records and if its a current structure, then they automatically assume you are a terrorist (which I am not BTW) and the plans are not to be released.If anyone could help, it would be greatly appreciated.
"tranx"


I have it on very good authority, that in the future, the masts you are referring to will be available to purchase!!  Smile
...and not too far into the future either, I might add!

I believe double and single masts are going to be produced.  Its not surprising, what with three different companies having either produced or announced various NSW electric stock and or locomotives.  Personally, I hope the price is good, because I too will be needing them, what with most of my planned HO layout to be 'wired'.

Kind regards,


Toby

  glagsniffer Junior Train Controller

Location: near liverpool, sydney
@ Toby, I'd like to see that!! I'm sure there is a few differing patterns but they all have a similar make up, for me there is about 3 types I want to make. The patterns seem to repeat and if you go to strathfield or the end of some of the platforms at central you could measure it up and repeat pattern. I too felt a bit of a terrorist going to work I got off one train with a basic diagram I'd drawn from a photo then I took some notes as to size, wish I knew where that was now....
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!

If a commercial one arrives it will be based on one of the many different styles that have been built. No guarantee it will match your line or era. Then you have the same topic as found in the locomotive or rollingstock model department which is commercial short cuts or outline generalizations taken for the purpose of reducing manufacturing problems or cost reduction reasons.

PS, this message is also a Railpage bug test. I just checked to ensure my “Notify me of replies” selection is set to “NO” but that seems to be a waste of time as previously I could not stop those notification emails on many other threads….

  Black_Ute Station Master

Location: Queanbeyan NSW
Another good reference book is the recently released "Coaching Stock of the NSW Railways - Volume 3" which deals primarily with the Sydney Suburban / Interurban electric network from circa 1926 to the present.  You can buy it direct from Eveligh Press here


Chapter two(2) deals with the infrastructure and there are sections on 'Overhead Wiring & Construction' and 'Overhead Stuctures' which includes the different types of masts and stanchions.  It's only a few pages but very informative.

The book is full of photos throughout which you can study and see the various types of stanchions and catenary used.





  DQ2004 Chief Commissioner

Location: Hobart -where the rain has lumps in it

@ Toby, I'd like to see that!! I'm sure there is a few differing patterns but they all have a similar make up, for me there is about 3 types I want to make. The patterns seem to repeat and if you go to strathfield or the end of some of the platforms at central you could measure it up and repeat pattern. I too felt a bit of a terrorist going to work I got off one train with a basic diagram I'd drawn from a photo then I took some notes as to size, wish I knew where that was now....
"glagsniffer"


I can't say any more, but I can say it is going to happen (models available).  I can't say what types or eras or who (I wouldn't be surprised if more than one producer is planning them, but I know for certain that at least one is), or anything like that, and I'm certainly no expert in what types of stanchions sit where -although I do know a bit about some of this subject.  I'm sure my knowledge on NSW electrification will blossom once layout construction starts!

My advice would be to perhaps get a bit of research done so that you know what you need, but wait before you start trying to source them yourself.


Cheers,


Toby

  rgmccau Junior Train Controller

Location: Canberra
I did some research a few years ago when we were planning our club layout (Yendys), mainly searching the internet for photos.  In the end one of our members sourced (and assembled & installed) all the catenary using a European brand (can't remember which, but an "accessorry" manufacturer, not a "train brand").  However it quickly became obvious that although there were periods when a particular physical type of mast might have been "in favour" (or even "official"), nearly every mast was unique in some way, either because of physical requirements or because it was older/newer than its neighbors.

For example, go to Rolfeworld (http://www.nswrail.net), go to Photos (across the top), then order them by date.  The second page has a photo of Loftus in 1940, and from then on there are lots of photos of the 1960s, and it's easy to pic the catenary masts and expand the photos.  Everything from major meccano constructions, to 3 pieces of I-beam, to telegraph poles.

Ross McConchie
Canberra
  glagsniffer Junior Train Controller

Location: near liverpool, sydney
Seen quite a few pieces of rail for uprights too
  yogibarnes Locomotive Fireman

The availability of commercial model catenary posts, aka overhead stanchions, is not far away.
See the Feb news from the Southern Rail web page.
  glagsniffer Junior Train Controller

Location: near liverpool, sydney
They look a little too new for my era but good to see things like this come up, might buy a couple and have a look anyway!
  Teditor Deputy Commissioner

Location: Toowoomba
Wuiske Promotions have masts in 10 packs, though they would of course be based on Qld ones, Google Wuiske Promotions and take a look at the accessories section.
  62440 Chief Commissioner

Pick your era.
The first electrification dates from 1916 or so to early 20's and many of these survive in the central area. They are however not always suitable for weight regulation and have been progressively replaced over the tears. At 100 years old, corrosion was an issue. The design generally survived until the system extensions, especially to Gosford. Since the 1980's masts are mostly UC's with 250UC being the most common. On the mutli track areas there can be huge spans where fabricated structures are the norm.
There were odd round timber poles as well.
On some lines like Epping Hornsby, 1980 additions were heavy drop verticals above the middle of the track. As the top booms were fairly light back to back channels, there was a noticeable effect on the cross beams.
I don't think there is a typical structure, check the line to Cowan, then beyond Cowan, then forgotten lines like Carlingford. It gives an excuse to trawl the system and pick an era.

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