Weathering : Powders Vs Airbrush

 
  Lobo_415 Beginner

Hi modeling experts. I've tried my hand on airbrush weathering an old fried motor Hornby 4472 Scotsman Tender drive (R.398 ). I'm a hobby custom car builder/spray painter/panel beater. So the airbrush and hobby enamel paints was a natural choice for me.

I've just lightly weathered the top of the boiler/roof with a matt grey (for ash) and matt black to give it that "sooty" layer. Also the wheels and motion rods with matt black, matt grey and a light spray of sand enamel. To give it that look that its been into use. And less of the plastic model look.

I'll get a picture up soon.

Whats your pros/cons on using enamels/acrylics compared to Weathering Powders?

My locomotives are going to be in static display for quite some time until I get my own house (instead of renting) to start my own  40/50's British themed layout.
Also is it and idea to lay down a coat of clear then add the soot/dirt detailing when weathering with an airbrush? IE so it gives the plastic more of a shine as if it were painted metal panels, then lay the matt soot/dirt layers on top?

I want to practice on a few older tender drive models I have before I take the plunge and hook into my good LNER collection. Haha

Thanks for your time and input guys.

Ben

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  Lobo_415 Beginner

Thanks for the info, ill check it out for sure!

Here's the dirty old scotty first attempt.

  oscar2 Locomotive Fireman

I'm no expert on the airbrush so only use it purely for painting kits. But I agree that a combination of methods is the best particularly as each produces different desirable effects.

Regarding clear coat then powders I do it the other way round. I use pastels for powders by chalking them up with  artist bristle brushes and apply with finer, softer sable type brushes then spray testors dullcote. No prep work to the dry painted surface. The dullcote wets out the pastel and darkens it somewhat, or rather reduces its impact, but with practice I've learnt to mix and add more brighter pastels to compensate. I suppose the advantage of spraying clear first is you can see as the powders go on immediately how much their colour changes and can adjust accordingly. However, I think I'd still rather the ability adjust the powder application before clear coat.

A couple more things if your into British modelling, checkout RMWeb. I read that all the time for inspiration and ideas even though I'm modelling NSW. Also there's a youtube channel "everard junction". It's BR and all diesel but his weathering is all airbrush which he covers in a few well put together tutorials.
  SPSD40T2 Chief Commissioner

Location: Platform 9-3/4 and still waiting !!
get yourself a sub to this mag..Absolutely brilliant stuff
The Weathering Magazine
  Thumpa Chief Train Controller

Location: That's on a need to know basis.
get yourself a sub to this mag..Absolutely brilliant stuff
The Weathering Magazine
SPSD40T2
WOW! Thanks for the link, I've downloaded the mags to read.

Who'd of thought of sexy chicks and model weathering would appear together? Guess you lot will just have to buy a copy too and see what I'm talking about...Twisted Evil

Thumpa.
  Lobo_415 Beginner

Haha. Thanks for all the info. I fixed the link. Photobucket was being a pain on my mobile.
Here's the others.

The old scotty. Before..


After : Still not totally impressed with it, needs improvement.




The Limited edition Mallard.




Painted the cab piping/gauges controls etc.



An old Schools class tender drive, I cut the molded coal out, bent up a new peice and added real coal. (I work at a coal mine.. Haha)



The Schools will be the next in line to be weathered. Hopefully I can perfect it on this one.
  SPSD40T2 Chief Commissioner

Location: Platform 9-3/4 and still waiting !!
WOW! Thanks for the link, I've downloaded the mags to read.

Who'd of thought of sexy chicks and model weathering would appear together? Guess you lot will just have to buy a copy too and see what I'm talking about...Twisted Evil

Thumpa.
Thumpa
I cant even remember how I managed to stumble upon this outfit, but I did just before they published issue 1. I ahve all of them and subscribe.  Ive long been a fan of how military modellers build dioramas and paint/weather their models.  Ive never quite understood the hesitancy or standoff that many railway modelers have to these techniques. I have no preference I just like to learn and experiment.

Theres NO single right way to do any of this, there are just elements to it al lthat you combine as suits you .

Some of the models in these pages I struggle to identify as even being models they are just that well done. The mob that publish the mag also market a range of products also. You dont have to use theirs  but some are somewhat unique and well thought through. Modelers making stuff for modelers etc

I like the way that very familiar items such as hairspray, salt or wax  etc all find new uses. Not everything in modelling need be exspensive.

Funny re the glam chick, my wife wondered what the hel lI was reading one day..lol

I reckon its all about just playing around with it all and having some fun. Sometimes the results are good...sometimes bin-able..lol

I heartily recommend this mag as a read.
  oscar2 Locomotive Fireman

After : Still not totally impressed with it, needs improvement.
Lobo_415

I'm not sure I'd do anything else to it.  It looks like you've dusted the running gear of the loco and tender with a light coat of grime but if not, that's the only thing I'd do really.  Or you could go ape and turn it into a rust bucket to practice on, after all, it's a non runner.  But if you go find a good pic of the Scotsman of which there'll be loads, they'll all show a pretty clean engine so as is should do.  And I suppose that's the main point, copy from the original where possible.  When I've tried to freelance a weathering job on a wagon I usually stuff it up by going overboard making the weathering look unrealistic, so I always now search for a few pics for inspiration or to copy parts of the prototype.

And yeah, that Weathering Mag. Impressive stuff!
  Lobo_415 Beginner

I'm not sure I'd do anything else to it.  It looks like you've dusted the running gear of the loco and tender with a light coat of grime but if not, that's the only thing I'd do really.  Or you could go ape and turn it into a rust bucket to practice on, after all, it's a non runner.  But if you go find a good pic of the Scotsman of which there'll be loads, they'll all show a pretty clean engine so as is should do.  And I suppose that's the main point, copy from the original where possible.  When I've tried to freelance a weathering job on a wagon I usually stuff it up by going overboard making the weathering look unrealistic, so I always now search for a few pics for inspiration or to copy parts of the prototype.

And yeah, that Weathering Mag. Impressive stuff!
oscar2

Yeah that was the plan. Same deal the Mallard and Tornado etc. I'll only lightly weather them since most pictures I find they are fairly clean, only with a soot layer on top of the boiler and the roof is always fairly matt in finish from ash/soot. Wheels are fairly clean just the gloss has been covered with a fine layer of dirt.

I have a very old book, It has a huge 2 page colour picture of Mallard in the early 60's. It's still glossy, but a more of a heavier layer of dirt/etc compared to the other A4's you see in preservation service today.

I might try a layer of clear or varnish first, then powders then a matt clear just over the powders to seal them. Or maybe powders while the paint is still tacky? To give the paint scheme that gloss look but with a fine layer of soot on top where it usually accumulates like most preserved well kept BR loco's today.

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