Would you move interstate for cheaper housing?

 
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
I thought this would make a pleasant change from elections and refugees.

There was an RP Data report last week that suggested Sydney, Melbourne, Perth and Canberra house prices had all accelerated by a fair amount in the 12 months to July.  Adelaide and Hobart have both declined by fair amounts - I can't find the report specifically referred to in the media off-hand at the moment but from memory I think the figures were 3 percent decline in Adelaide and 7 percent in Hobart.  Granted that Hobart and Adelaide have the poorest longer term economic prospects but their cheaper housing might in itself attract economic migrants.

People who know me from my posts would be aware that I've previously lived in Adelaide and I would have no problem with moving back there - in fact, I've been thinking about what I could do for work if I lived there.  I like the idea of being close to the beach and there's reasonably affordable property in the Western suburbs (because a lot of Adelaide people are too snobby to live there!); public transport is quite good and its big enough to have lots of the cultural things I like doing.  

I also have close friends in and around Ballarat and I've also been thinking if I could live there; in reference to Railpage boards and previous discussions, I think the advent of the 'fast train' has made Ballarat definitely a much more attractive place to live by virtue of the fact you can easily do a day trip to Melbourne and even commute for work if you really have to.  There's also a lot of old Victorian and Edwardian properties reasonably cheap and I really love the old world charms of the main drag.

My question to other Railpage users is: Would you be prepared to move inter-state/country to buy a house?  If so, where?  This is bearing in mind personal circumstances, financial resources etc. but I'm interested to hear what you would be prepared to lose in order to own your own home.

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  awsgc24 Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney

My question to other Railpage users is: Would you be prepared to move inter-state/country to buy a house?  If so, where?  This is bearing in mind personal circumstances, financial resources etc. but I'm interested to hear what you would be prepared to lose in order to
don_dunstan

Boat people, all of whom are genuine refugees fleeing persecution, with no economic migrants amongst them, would be happy/overjoyed to take over vacant houses in declining towns such as Barallen, NSW.
  Graham4405 The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Dalby Qld
Just because the purchase price of a house is low doesn't necessarily make the purchase of it economically desirable. Wages may be substantially lower, jobs may be scarce, the cost of living may be higher, the home may need extensive and expensive renovation/refurbishment. Many factors to consider, thus the question isn't easy to answer, however if all or most factors were favourable I would answer "Yes" provided the area was liveable enough.
  hosk1956 Deputy Commissioner

Location: no where near gunzels
We had a Victorian come and work with us here in Adelaide, he always said the cost of living in Melbourne was high and jobs were scarce so he moved to Adelaide for cheaper housing and cost of living, to have a job to come to was a bonus for him. It didn't take him long to start complaining about Adelaide and it's people and he decided he wanted to move back to Melbourne, then the very reason he moved to Adelaide became a liability, the housing market was depressed at the time and he had trouble selling his house, of course he didn't stop whinging about the value he would maybe get for his home here compared to how much houses were in Melbourne, he finally sold and we got rid of him, sorry Victoria but he is all yours.
Doesn't help your discussion Don but I thought I would relate it, it's another aspect that people should think about before any life changing move.

Wayne
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
We had a Victorian come and work with us here in Adelaide, he always said the cost of living in Melbourne was high and jobs were scarce so he moved to Adelaide for cheaper housing and cost of living, to have a job to come to was a bonus for him. It didn't take him long to start complaining about Adelaide and it's people and he decided he wanted to move back to Melbourne, then the very reason he moved to Adelaide became a liability, the housing market was depressed at the time and he had trouble selling his house, of course he didn't stop whinging about the value he would maybe get for his home here compared to how much houses were in Melbourne, he finally sold and we got rid of him, sorry Victoria but he is all yours.
Doesn't help your discussion Don but I thought I would relate it, it's another aspect that people should think about before any life changing move.

Wayne
hosk1956

Thanks for that, Hosk, it is an interesting story.

Adelaide market is more depressed than Melbourne, no doubt about that, but that's part of the attraction surely because it's much better value for money.  If I ever moved back to Adelaide I would know exactly what to expect because I've done it before. I've done smaller regional towns as well as Melbourne and Adelaide, I really don't think you can complain about living somewhere like Adelaide, there's all the services and the weather is slightly better than Melbourne to boot.

My main complaint with small regional towns is problems with accessing things like decent health care, education and the cultural things that you can enjoy in a big city.  One of my friends is thinking (at the moment) of moving to a rural community because of the cheaper housing and we were discussing the pros and cons, hence I started this thread.  It's weird to hear that someone whinged so vehemently about Adelaide, I really don't understand how someone can claim to be deprived there - it really isn't that different to Melbourne in my opinion.
  DirtyBallast Chief Commissioner

Location: Standing at the limit of an endless ocean
My main complaint with small regional towns is problems with accessing things like decent health care, education and the cultural things that you can enjoy in a big city.  
don_dunstan
True, but how often does one feel the need to be 'cultured?'

If the definition of culture is to see an occasional performance or visiting exhibition in the capital city of your chosen state, what is the real difference between a 2 hour trip from your regional town or a half hour suburban train trip? In reality, for the amount of times that such a journey is made, bugger all!
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
True, but how often does one feel the need to be 'cultured?'

If the definition of culture is to see an occasional performance or visiting exhibition in the capital city of your chosen state, what is the real difference between a 2 hour trip from your regional town or a half hour suburban train trip? In reality, for the amount of times that such a journey is made, bugger all!
DirtyBallast

Depends on what you are in to.  Going to the occasional live show is good fun but not as easy when you live outside of the metro area.  I like also doing things like going to the fresh food markets once a week (the food is usually better than the dross from the big two) and popping in to deceased estate auctions (when I have time).  Granted you could probably do that from Ballarat pretty easily but places further afield like the Ararat, the SA Riverland, Horsham, Hamilton, Mt Gambier etc make it much harder to do stuff like that.

Given I hate driving it's also handier to live somewhere with a good, usable P/T network.
  cootanee Chief Commissioner

Location: North of the border!
Depends on what you are in to.  Going to the occasional live show is good fun but not as easy when you live outside of the metro area.  I like also doing things like going to the fresh food markets once a week (the food is usually better than the dross from the big two) and popping in to deceased estate auctions (when I have time).  Granted you could probably do that from Ballarat pretty easily but places further afield like the Ararat, the SA Riverland, Horsham, Hamilton, Mt Gambier etc make it much harder to do stuff like that.

Given I hate driving it's also handier to live somewhere with a good, usable P/T network.
don_dunstan

With an aging population access to medical services and aged care is an increasing problem outside the major cities. Indeed some towns could be described as 'aging'.
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
With an aging population access to medical services and aged care is an increasing problem outside the major cities. Indeed some towns could be described as 'aging'.
cootanee

I grew up in a large rural town and the health-care was atrocious.  There used to be a waiting list before a GP would even accept you as his patient and even then most of the good ones wouldn't take on new patients.  If you managed to get a GP you would still have to wait about a fortnight between booking your appointment and actually seeing the GP so things like obtaining a medical certificate for work etc were nearly impossible (unless you physically went down the surgery and sat there all day until she/he could squeeze you in).

Apparently that situation has changed in the last twenty years and it's not such a long wait to see GP's any more but the standards are still very poor.  I still blame my old man's GP for the fact that he missed his prostate cancer until it had gone terminal.  Things like that mean I would never consider moving to a town smaller than (say) 100,000 or so, the services just aren't up to scratch.  And you are right about the aging populations, every time I go back I see zimmer-frames everywhere because most of the young people leave as soon as they finish school and don't come back.
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
Actually, Cootanee, on second thought I think the one exception for better services in the country is aged care.

My late grandmother was in a bush-nursing home (in the same rural town as my old man) for many years prior to her passing and I must say the standard of care there was really excellent, much better than any other nursing home I've ever seen.  The staff were really attentive, it was always spotless, well-resourced and apart from my grandmother's incessant whinging about how much she wished she was dead (a wish that of course came true eventually) it was a great place for her to be.  Even though it was a public facility she had her own private bathroom and balcony, it was really spacious and lots of residents had their pets with them there.
  TheBlacksmith Chief Commissioner

Location: Ankh Morpork
Actually, Cootanee, on second thought I think the one exception for better services in the country is aged care.

My late grandmother was in a bush-nursing home (in the same rural town as my old man) for many years prior to her passing and I must say the standard of care there was really excellent, much better than any other nursing home I've ever seen.  The staff were really attentive, it was always spotless, well-resourced and apart from my grandmother's incessant whinging about how much she wished she was dead (a wish that of course came true eventually) it was a great place for her to be.  Even though it was a public facility she had her own private bathroom and balcony, it was really spacious and lots of residents had their pets with them there.
don_dunstan

Get me the address, I'll go there now.....
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
Get me the address, I'll go there now.....
TheBlacksmith

No joke, it was the closest thing I've ever seen to a hotel and it was part of a public hospital - so yeah, some things they do better in the bush.

She made it hell for herself though, she always made you sorry you came to visit her and then she whinged incessantly about how nobody came to see her.  I was visiting her once and they were playing games in the day room.  I said "Looks like fun, let's go and join in..." to which she replied (loud enough for everyone to hear) "I hate those bloody bitches, they can rot in hell."

I really hope I'm not that bitter about being old when I get there...
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
No joke, it was the closest thing I've ever seen to a hotel and it was part of a public hospital - so yeah, some things they do better in the bush.

She made it hell for herself though, she always made you sorry you came to visit her and then she whinged incessantly about how nobody came to see her.  I was visiting her once and they were playing games in the day room.  I said "Looks like fun, let's go and join in..." to which she replied (loud enough for everyone to hear) "I hate those bloody bitches, they can rot in hell."

I really hope I'm not that bitter about being old when I get there...
don_dunstan
We all have one or two like that in a family Don but what about a family that blot out one of their own simply because he married the one he loved who was a lot older than him. I saw this the other day and it disgusted me. He's about 35 or so and she is 50 just turned the corner. But as far as I can see they both love one another greatly. He was critical in hospital and not one of his family, not his mother or father or brothers even went in to see him. His wife and I did and we were his only visitors the nurses told us. And this from a family who think they are Christians makes me glad that I am an atheist actually.
  cootanee Chief Commissioner

Location: North of the border!
Get me the address, I'll go there now.....
TheBlacksmith

It's going to come to a head in the next two decades especially in those coastal areas where retirees are moving to.
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
We all have one or two like that in a family Don but what about a family that blot out one of their own simply because he married the one he loved who was a lot older than him. I saw this the other day and it disgusted me. He's about 35 or so and she is 50 just turned the corner. But as far as I can see they both love one another greatly. He was critical in hospital and not one of his family, not his mother or father or brothers even went in to see him. His wife and I did and we were his only visitors the nurses told us. And this from a family who think they are Christians makes me glad that I am an atheist actually.
David Peters

That sort of behaviour is really sickening, David, I have to agree - we should be free to love whoever we want without families withdrawing approval.  So-called God-fearing people who stand in judgement of other people are particularly infuriating because they like to think they have a moral basis for being completely revolting to their fellow human being.  A close friend of mine is a devout Baptist and she's the total opposite of that but I also have another friend who is supposedly a pious Catholic and she's CONSTANTLY judging others - it's quite nauseating actually - and she's also in the social services so I shudder to think how she passes judgement on the people she's supposed to be helping.

I was incensed to hear about your friend (family member?) who is alone and sick in hospital - at least you are being more Christ-like than the other family members who can't be bothered going to see him.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
To me, choosing a place to live based on economics goes this way.

How much can I earn there? $A - minus cost of living including cost of housing = $B. The location with the biggest $B therefore must win.

Tasmania can be cheap, but the salaries are lower, NW WA can be great, but you need $1m to buy a basic house. My previous place in Gladstone for a while there, anyone could get $100k salary for the short term, but a nice 4 bed house on 2 acres would set you back $1000/wk.
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat Line
My question to other Railpage users is: Would you be prepared to move inter-state/country to buy a house?  If so, where?  This is bearing in mind personal circumstances, financial resources etc. but I'm interested to hear what you would be prepared to lose in order to own your own home.
don_dunstan
I already own my own home in paradise, consequently I can't ever see myself moving from where I am.

Fortunately I like cold weather and the cold weather in Ballan makes Melbourne seem tropical by comparison. I think our bitter winters even has a deterrent affect on the no-hopers and ner-do-wells that move to Ballan during our temperate summers, then move away again when the bitter winter winds start.. Laughing

Mike.
  cootanee Chief Commissioner

Location: North of the border!
To me, choosing a place to live based on economics goes this way.

How much can I earn there? $A - minus cost of living including cost of housing = $B. The location with the biggest $B therefore must win.

Tasmania can be cheap, but the salaries are lower, NW WA can be great, but you need $1m to buy a basic house. My previous place in Gladstone for a while there, anyone could get $100k salary for the short term, but a nice 4 bed house on 2 acres would set you back $1000/wk.
RTT_Rules

Bali is pretty popular for WA FIFO'ers.
  Donald Chief Commissioner

Location: Donald. Duck country.
I already own my own home in paradise, consequently I can't ever see myself moving from where I am.

Fortunately I like cold weather and the cold weather in Ballan makes Melbourne seem tropical by comparison. I think our bitter winters even has a deterrent affect on the no-hopers and ner-do-wells that move to Ballan during our temperate summers, then move away again when the bitter winter winds start.. lol

Mike.
The Vinelander
Mike,
I reckon the only place colder than Ballan in winter would be the top of Mt. Hotham!!!

I like your theory on the shallow end of the gene pool players.
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
I already own my own home in paradise, consequently I can't ever see myself moving from where I am.

Fortunately I like cold weather and the cold weather in Ballan makes Melbourne seem tropical by comparison. I think our bitter winters even has a deterrent affect on the no-hopers and ner-do-wells that move to Ballan during our temperate summers, then move away again when the bitter winter winds start.. Laughing

Mike.
The Vinelander

My friends who reside in Ballarat have a huge ducted central heater and they keep it running all winter - they turn it down to 17 degrees when they go to bed, off in the morning and back up to 22 degrees again when they get home from work.  I think it's the only way any rational human being can live in Ballarat, it's just too bitterly cold otherwise.  Much as a I love a real fireplace, it's so much effort to get it going when you get home from work, flicking a switch is much easier.  Apparently there's been no snow or sleet this winter which is kind of surprising - usually when they get it it's by late August or not at all.

My other friends who live on the Glenelg Hwy just out of Ballarat have the same issues - they have been trying to grow citrus but any lemon trees just can't survive the bitterly cold winters.  I was astonished to see some gazanias and wall-flowers that I gave them last year also got knifed by the frost, it's a real killer.  It can get really cold up there even during the summers.  I was there one December and they had this terribly thick fog that hung around all day, very strange.  A long-term local also told us about the heavy snow they had one Christmas day years ago - so it was a white Xmas in Australia!
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
To me, choosing a place to live based on economics goes this way.

How much can I earn there? $A - minus cost of living including cost of housing = $B. The location with the biggest $B therefore must win.

Tasmania can be cheap, but the salaries are lower, NW WA can be great, but you need $1m to buy a basic house. My previous place in Gladstone for a while there, anyone could get $100k salary for the short term, but a nice 4 bed house on 2 acres would set you back $1000/wk.
RTT_Rules

It's interesting you mention you lived in Gladstone, I read in Fairfax's Domain today that Gladstone used to be too expensive for the mining industry workers to rent or buy in but presently it's at the epicentre of a mini-crash occurring in those Central QLD mining towns.  Places in central Gladstone used to rent for $1000 p/w and now they can't get anything like that any more.  I wonder if those Pilbara towns will follow at some stage?

I'm looking at moving somewhere that's already economically depressed so it will either be SA, Tassie or rural Victoria.  Presumably if you aren't zooming ahead then you can't fall down too far if/when there's a crash; the only issue becomes one of how you sustain yourself once you're there.
  TheBlacksmith Chief Commissioner

Location: Ankh Morpork
Much as a I love a real fireplace, it's so much effort to get it going when you get home from work, flicking a switch is much easier.
don_dunstan
It may be easier flicking a switch, but much more expensive. It only costs us a fraction of the price of electricity or gas to run our wood heater, and I can easily get cheap firewood delivered because very second bloke is doing it to earn a few dollars.
  don_dunstan Dr Beeching

Location: Adelaide proud
It may be easier flicking a switch, but much more expensive. It only costs us a fraction of the price of electricity or gas to run our wood heater, and I can easily get cheap firewood delivered because very second bloke is doing it to earn a few dollars.
TheBlacksmith

That only works when you live in a rural locale where it's readily available.  I also know from experience living in the bush that it was a pain it is to get home from work and then have to start work immediately on building a fire; it's fun but not always the first thing you want to do when you get home.  Also, if you are geriatric or otherwise enfeebled then making a fire and cleaning up the ash all the time is sometimes beyond you; I have a friend who is nearly 80 and he's recently decided to give up on wood fires for that reason.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
It's interesting you mention you lived in Gladstone, I read in Fairfax's Domain today that Gladstone used to be too expensive for the mining industry workers to rent or buy in but presently it's at the epicentre of a mini-crash occurring in those Central QLD mining towns.  Places in central Gladstone used to rent for $1000 p/w and now they can't get anything like that any more.  I wonder if those Pilbara towns will follow at some stage?

I'm looking at moving somewhere that's already economically depressed so it will either be SA, Tassie or rural Victoria.  Presumably if you aren't zooming ahead then you can't fall down too far if/when there's a crash; the only issue becomes one of how you sustain yourself once you're there.
don_dunstan
This is where having an online business would work unless you are a self funded retiree.

I should have sold my house in Gladstone 2 years ago. We kept it, just in case we move back.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
That only works when you live in a rural locale where it's readily available.  I also know from experience living in the bush that it was a pain it is to get home from work and then have to start work immediately on building a fire; it's fun but not always the first thing you want to do when you get home.  Also, if you are geriatric or otherwise enfeebled then making a fire and cleaning up the ash all the time is sometimes beyond you; I have a friend who is nearly 80 and he's recently decided to give up on wood fires for that reason.
don_dunstan
Open fire, no too much bloody work. Been there done that won't do it again. Combustion heater at least the wood pumps out some heat, you can heat hot water and it doesn't take much to get going or maintain.

For my money two part heating,
1) Concrete slab on floor and electric in slab heating. Turn it on at start of winter and turn it off in spring. Your feet are warm and the heat rises up evening around the house so you don't need to have the house as hot to feel cosy. Have the setting at 17-18C with the house closed up that prevents the place becoming an ice box and keeps the humidity lower. 90% of the time this is all you need to get ready for work in AM without getting lumps on your neck and for short lazy night at home before sleep without stuffing around with fires and during day on a warmish winter weekend.

2) Then combustion heater to boost as required to make it more cosy such as when people come to visit (women often look better with less clothes) and preheat/heat the hot water to save on hot water bill. While the combustion heater is going it will also save you power on the slab. I'd also duct from directly above the heater with a booster fan to the further ends of the house.

Yes the slab electric heating can be a few more bucks to run, but its very low maintanence. If you want put solar/wind turbine out side to offset your costs if viable where you live. Where I livd once in West Tassie, a 2kW solar panels + 1kW wind turbine would have worked well, but at the time it was too expensive to justify, much more viable today.

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