Port Lincoln notes

 
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
Will there be much running on the Eyre Peninsula this Sunday and Monday?

Thanks
AN830

Was away over the weekend, sorry for the late response. There should be a grainy heading out of Port Lincoln this evening and another early morning, destinations unknown. The gypo at Thevenard should be on its regular 3 trips a day cycle.

Cheers,
Peter

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  hosk1956 Deputy Commissioner

Location: no where near gunzels
Was away over the weekend, sorry for the late response. There should be a grainy heading out of Port Lincoln this evening and another early morning, destinations unknown. The gypo at Thevenard should be on its regular 3 trips a day cycle.

Cheers,
Peter
pjknife
You got home all right then, did you wear the print of that book? LOL
Were you pre aware that the  Train Hobby "Eyre Peninsula Railways" book was coming out Peter? that one took me by surprise along with South Australian Rail Heritage Journal, #1 and 2, came home with plenty of reading this year.

Wayne
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
The last Eyre Peninsula grain trains for the 2012/13 season returned to Port Lincoln last night. Over the last couple of weeks the movements have been irregular, with both trains remaining at places such as Kyancutta and Kimba for a couple of days at a time while the remaining grain was manually cleared from silos.

During the grain shutdown the hopper fleet will be cleaned and fumigated. Rakes of 35 at a time will be moved to Cummins for this to occur.

A loco transfer to Thevenard should be leaving Port Lincoln this morning. 905, 848, 850 and 1601 are going west and "taxi" loco 905 will bring 902 and another unit back for workshops attention.
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
Were you pre aware that the  Train Hobby "Eyre Peninsula Railways" book was coming out Peter? that one took me by surprise along with South Australian Rail Heritage Journal, #1 and 2, came home with plenty of reading this year.
hosk1956
Hi Wayne, yes, I was well aware of the Train Hobby book and was eagerly anticipating its release. It's a really good selection of images, and is a welcome addition to the published literature on this great little corner of the railway world!

Peter
  steam4ian Chief Commissioner

Peter

How are the drivers deployed while there are no grain movements?

Do any move across to Adelaide?.

Ian
  Railwayfan Train Controller

Location: By a Railway
Hi Ian,
As far as I know, crews live here permantly (or base themselves here) and work the trains only on the EP. They can be shifted in necessary to work up in Thevenard if required for small amounts of time, however, a transfer would be required to work elsewhere. Although, they go to Adelaide fo training like the Pt Augusta crews have in the past.
Nathan
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
Grain began moving by rail again into Port Lincoln a couple of weeks ago. Harvest is virtually complete in the northern Eyre Peninsula and West Coast areas, but is only just getting under way further south. At this stage grain is being railed from Wudinna, Kimba and Rudall. The 'daylight saving' times are in effect, with early- and mid-morning departures from Port Lincoln, returning overnight.

848, 1601 and 1603 came back from Thevenard last week, leaving 846, 850, 902 and 1606 for the gypo. 850 is suffering ground relays, so has spent more time there not running than running lately.

1204 is currently in the workshop for engine and alternator work, and isn't expected back in traffic for several weeks. In the meantime one grainy is running with quad locos, and left this morning with 1601/1603 back-to-back leading two 830s.

842 has been 'mothballed' and currently sits off the turntable at Port Lincoln.

Whyalla hopper refurbishments continue at Port Lincoln. RSK 104 is under way, the last of the RSKs to be done in the current program. One of the HNKs (ex SAR HN) arrived on Tuesday for work, and other HNKs will be coming down for work over the next two months.

Cheers,
Peter
  jt393 Assistant Commissioner

Location: los jinetes enmascarados' clubhouse
As always, cheers for the updates. Always great to hear you giving updates from Port Lincoln.
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
1204 is still in the workshops, so one grain train continues to run as a quad - yesterday it was 848/851/850/859. The other grain train has been typically 906 and 1203 bookending a third loco.

850 came back south a few weeks ago for some attention, and has since been running on grain trains. Not being equipped with a sat phone, it rarely leads, however on 26/11/13 it was in the lead (with 873 and 1203) for what is believed to be the first time in daylight on a grain train since its overhaul. This shot is of the triple approaching Wanilla:



Thevenard is currently getting by with just three locos, currently 847, 902 and 1603. Services are down to generally two per day five days per week at the moment, with possibly a shutdown over the Christmas period. This is apparently due to reduced demand for gypsum at the moment.

Cheers,
Peter
  dmgrail Junior Train Controller

Location: Wangaratta Vic. 3677
Good evening all,

The accompanying photo of ENHB 86 was taken at Port Lincoln by Norm Bray on Thursday 5th December 2013. The origins of the wagon are a Victorian NN Ballast Hopper, and most probably NN 86 judging by the road number. Are any South Australian members able to shed any light of its activities in South Australia and when it ended up at Port Lincoln?

Yours assistance is greatly appreciated

Daryl M Gregory



  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
Hi Daryl,

That vehicle came to Port Lincoln in 2007 and was trialled on the gypsum train. If it was successful then GWA hoped to use more NNs to increase the length of the gypsum train. Nothing came of the project, and it has remained here unused ever since. I'm not aware of it having been used elsewhere in South Australia before coming here.

See also http://www.peninsula-pioneer.com/rs-enhb2.html.

Cheers,
Peter
  dmgrail Junior Train Controller

Location: Wangaratta Vic. 3677
Hi Daryl,

That vehicle came to Port Lincoln in 2007 and was trialled on the gypsum train. If it was successful then GWA hoped to use more NNs to increase the length of the gypsum train. Nothing came of the project, and it has remained here unused ever since. I'm not aware of it having been used elsewhere in South Australia before coming here.

See also http://www.peninsula-pioneer.com/rs-enhb2.html.

Cheers,
Peter
pjknife

Hi Peter,

Thanks for posting the information and link re ENHB 86. NN 86 was last on the books in Victoria as Chicago Freight Car Leasing Australia's CHBA 86 in 2006.

Your response and link have assisted with both Norm's and my enquiries.

Regards

Daryl
  mrjones Station Master

Hi Peter I was in Lincoln Xmas eve and noticed that the excess 830's were no longer on the turntable, do you know where they have gone?

Also good to see the 3 X 830's bringing in a grainy Smile
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
Hi Peter I was in Lincoln Xmas eve and noticed that the excess 830's were no longer on the turntable, do you know where they have gone?
mrjones
865 and 871 are in the main yard opposite the freight shed, along with the ENHG ballast hoppers. They were all moved there when the last batch of AHPF hoppers for Whyalla came through here for fitting out, to make room in the workshops yard. 842 is at the back of the main workshop building, near the Le Brun St level crossing.
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
GWA and Viterra are currently negotiating a renewal of the grain haulage contract on Eyre Peninsula. While no contract has been signed yet, I am reliably informed that the likely outcome is that the current two contracted rakes of 55 hoppers will be replaced with a single rake of 65 hoppers from 1st May.

If that occurs (and it seems highly likely that it will), there will be a general downsizing of the fleet, staffing and operations at Port Lincoln. I don't have any details of the proposed operational pattern, but my guess is that the two ex-WA A class and one or two 830/900 class would be the regular power.

From a railfan perspective this is disappointing, with a halving of photographic opportunities. As a resident, it concerns me that an extra 1500 tonnes of grain per day will need to come in to Port Lincoln by road. I assume that Viterra's stance is on a purely commercial basis, which highlights the current inequities in Australia where rail, which is inherently a more efficient transport mode, must pay all its fixed and running costs yet road does not come close to covering the equivalent costs involved.

Peter
  steam4ian Chief Commissioner

Peter

That 1500 tonne per day of grain represents how many trucks?

What tonnage of grain is moved by road at present?

What tonnage is moved by rail?

I note that elsewhere Vitera seem to be "biased against rail.

Regards
Ian
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
GWA and Viterra are currently negotiating a renewal of the grain haulage contract on Eyre Peninsula. While no contract has been signed yet, I am reliably informed that the likely outcome is that the current two contracted rakes of 55 hoppers will be replaced with a single rake of 65 hoppers from 1st May.

If that occurs (and it seems highly likely that it will), there will be a general downsizing of the fleet, staffing and operations at Port Lincoln. I don't have any details of the proposed operational pattern, but my guess is that the two ex-WA A class and one or two 830/900 class would be the regular power.

From a railfan perspective this is disappointing, with a halving of photographic opportunities. As a resident, it concerns me that an extra 1500 tonnes of grain per day will need to come in to Port Lincoln by road. I assume that Viterra's stance is on a purely commercial basis, which highlights the current inequities in Australia where rail, which is inherently a more efficient transport mode, must pay all its fixed and running costs yet road does not come close to covering the equivalent costs involved.

Peter
pjknife


We all appreciate the update Peter.

I am at a loss to understand how 1500 tonnes / 50 tonnes? per truck could possibly be cheaper than running a block train of 55 wagons of 50? tonnes per wagon?  This is a minimum of 30 trucks per day at 50 tonnes per truck (loaded) and then there is the return journey.  Australia is going backwards.  

If this is purely on a commercial basis then where is Viterra's tripple bottom line reporting?  What are the costs to the road network and the environment?

I am confused.

Regards
Brian
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
What are the costs to the road network and the environment?
bevans

This is exactly what it's all about. Rail here has to cover the total cost of its infrastructure and maintenance with absolutely no contribution from government or anyone else, while road gets away with only a partial cost recovery of actual maintenance costs (let alone the capital cost of providing the road in the first place). Rail pays the full cost of diesel fuel (as I understand it) whereas road transport gets a substantial rebate. And in total direct costs (fuel, wages and environmental) rail should be far more efficient.

But unfortunately under our current road and rail pricing regimes, despite the inherent efficiencies of rail, it is either equivalent cost or cheaper to use road. Neither side of politics has had the fortitude to stand up to vested interests and create a remotely level playing field.
  justapassenger Chief Commissioner

I asked a contact on Eyre Peninsula connected with the grain business about transport into Port Lincoln via road or rail last year, and reliably informed that the Viterra-managed grain coming in via road is not coming from areas connected to the rail line. Were it to be trucked to the nearest rail-connected facility to be double-handled you would still have trucks making long journeys plus extra trains.  

There is another similar issue as well as Viterra - as more farms are sold off to big money from China and the Persian Gulf, those farms will not be having anything to do with Viterra. They most definitely will not be using Viterra's rail-connected loading facilities.
  K-Class Chief Train Controller

Location: Melbourne
If my memory serves me correctly the two Eyre Peninsular grain trains only run for around 9 months or so of the year and following poor grain season it stops even earlier. From GWA's point of view they would much rather run the one set all year than have two sets idle for 3 months or so.

Running two 55 wagon trains daily for 9 months is 30100 wagon loads compared to running all year with a single 65 wagon train  is 23725 wagon loads. This is a reduction of about 27%.

In a poor year hardly any extra grain will go on the road but for the next bumper crop there will be considerable extra truck movements required.

Matt
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
The annual cessation of grain haulage by rail varies considerably, and depends totally on the size of the harvest. The last two years have seen shutdowns of weeks, not months, and trains ran continuously all year for the preceding three years. The latest harvest on Eyre Peninsula was one of the largest on record, so under the old arrangement would have kept two trains running all year.

There is another factor affecting rail's share of grain haulage here - shipping schedules. If several ships load in quick succession the silos at Port Lincoln empty, and it is necessary to top up from country storage quickly. Trucks already pick up extra haulage from rail-served sites when this occurs, and if only one (enlarged) rake is in use, this will inevitably occur more often.
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
A few loco updates at Port Lincoln. 1601/848 departed Port Lincoln on Tuesday light engine to Thevenard, relieving 1603/847 which arrived back in Port Lincoln this morning. Locos currently at Thevenard are 848, 902, 1601 and 1606.

1204's overhaul is now complete, and it will be tested on today's Cummins train 6AE1/6AE2 which will be hauled by 1204/850/846/873/851, an interesting quin! Its return to service will see the end of regular quad working for the time being.

Cheers,
Peter
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
1204's overhaul is now complete, and it will be tested on today's Cummins train 6AE1/6AE2 which will be hauled by 1204/850/846/873/851, an interesting quin! Its return to service will see the end of regular quad working for the time being.
pjknife

Unfortunately 1204 didn't even make it out of loco today for its test run. Needs a bit more attention still.
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
1204 went for a test run to Cummins on Monday, leading 850-873-846-1603 in an impressive lineup. However it has been back in the workshops ever since, still not right to go. Here is #2AE1 rolling through Coomunga:



Cheers,
Peter
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
1204 went for another test run to Cummins today, leading 850-873-846-859.

Another Thevenard loco swap is taking place this week. 1603 is going west, and 1606-848 will be coming in for workshops attention leaving only 3 units at Thevenard for the time being. This swap is a bit different to the usual arrangement - 1603 will be ferried to Wudinna on a grainy while 1606 and 848 come down from Thevenard to Minnipa. An extra crew will work Wudinna-Minnipa-Wudinna to swap the locos around, and 1603 will continue west while the others will be picked up at Wudinna by the next grain train.

The new Viterra/GWA contract for EP has not been signed yet, but a bit more detail on the revised arrangements from 1st May has come to light. Apparently the total tonnage to be brought in by rail will be the same as the current two-train arrangement. As the single train will not be double the length of the current ones, that will mean quite a few extra days with two return trips to Cummins (the only destination where that can be achieved in under 24 hours). Wudinna and Kimba will still be rail-served. Standard power is anticipated to be the two 1200s plus two 830s.

Cheers,
Peter

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