Freight train tonnages

 
  ndenver Beginner

Well guys I am an engineer for the BNSF in the US mainly haul coal where I live, just curious how heavy you coal and or frieght trains run there. Our normal coal loads here in denver run @ 128 cars @ 18,000-20,000 tons ( heavyest i have run is 22,000 configured 3x2 distributed power 5 c-44 ge.s ) mountain grade territory @ here. inyerested in talking more with someone in rail business there.

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  Sulla1 Chief Commissioner

In Queensland on 3ft6 gauge the biggest coal trains run with 120 106t hoppers grossing out at  nearly 13,000 tonnes. They use three AC traction electrics or four AC traction diesels in DP. Narrow gauge ore trains on the Mt Isa line are  up to 7400 tonnes with three AC traction diesels in DP, with 4000 tonne acid and ore trains using one DC and one AC diesel. Much bigger iron ore trains in Western Australia's Pilbara, but I'm sure someone closer to that action will be able to add the details.
  Rodo Chief Commissioner

Location: Southern Riverina
The largest coal trains in New South Wales are about 12,000 tonnes. A fair bit larger than when I operated them.

Sulla is correct about the Pilbara ore trains being the largest in Aus. I think a gross weight of some 30,000 tonnes is common.
  Grantham Minister for Railways

Location: I'm with stupid!
The largest coal trains in the mountains west of Sydney are 4,600t, although there have been trials of 6,000t trains. The grades here are pretty steep though. Five of the local variant of C44 GEs would only get you less than 8,000t on the grades around here. The ruling uphill grade is 1/40 (2.42?%) and downhill is 1/33.

Here is a shot of one of the local GM variants, in this case on one of the 6,000t test trains, at Baalbone Colliery (currently closed). Normally four of these units pull a 4,500t train.

[img]http://img13.imageshack.us/img13/4324/baalbone.jpg[/img]

And a few of the local AC44 variant. Usually three of these will pull a 4,600t train through the Blue Mountains, although these belong to a Hunter Valley based company, not the Blue Mountains based one. These ones are on the branch of the Baalbone mine on secret business. Wink

[img]http://img826.imageshack.us/img826/2618/dg0y.jpg[/img]
  wally-wowser1 Train Controller

Location: overlooking the Mt vic washaway on Soldiers Pinch
The same 3 xstrata units in the last photo above pull 96 x120 ton hoppers on gentler grades in the Hunter Valley , the worlds busiest coal export port.
  awsgc24 Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney
Well guys I am an engineer for the BNSF in the US mainly haul coal where I live, just curious how heavy you coal and or freight trains run there. Our normal coal loads here in Denver run @ 128 cars @ 18,000-20,000 tons ( heaviest I have run is 22,000 configured 3x2 distributed power 5 c-44 ge.s ) mountain grade territory @ here. interested in talking more with someone in rail business there.
ndenver

Quite a lot of this information has been compiled on Wikipedia in "Heaviest Trains" and "Longest Trains".

This information isn't clear if the weight or lengths include the engines. The number of waggons is also not the same as the length in metres.

There are also a number of atypical one-off trains to set records for say the Guiness Book of Records.

PS. NDenver is a wry mispelling of NDeavour, the sailing ship used to discover the east coast of Australia, and a retired Space Shuttle.
  Raichase Captain Rant!

Location: Sydney, NSW
Really sorry in advance for the quick off-topic question, but if I don't ask, I won't learn...

Grantham, the signal in your first photo is protecting the coal loader - I'm assuming it can show "caution", "stop" or "calling on". Would that be controlled by the coal unloader - ie if it is ready to accept a train for loading, one would see a calling on, while if one is just passing through it would display a caution? Thanks in advance, feel free to contact privately if you would prefer Smile.
  Grantham Minister for Railways

Location: I'm with stupid!
Really sorry in advance for the quick off-topic question, but if I don't ask, I won't learn...

Grantham, the signal in your first photo is protecting the coal loader - I'm assuming it can show "caution", "stop" or "calling on". Would that be controlled by the coal unloader - ie if it is ready to accept a train for loading, one would see a calling on, while if one is just passing through it would display a caution? Thanks in advance, feel free to contact privately if you would prefer Smile.
Raichase
The signal can only show stop or calling on, the loader operated it. Any resemblance to a normal running signal is coincidental.
  Raichase Captain Rant!

Location: Sydney, NSW
The signal can only show stop or calling on, the loader operated it. Any resemblance to a normal running signal is coincidental.
Grantham
Thanks for the information, I'd assume the top aspect is blanked out then?
  ndenver Beginner



  ndenver Beginner

The largest coal trains in the mountains west of Sydney are 4,600t, although there have been trials of 6,000t trains. The grades here are pretty steep though. Five of the local variant of C44 GEs would only get you less than 8,000t on the grades around here. The ruling uphill grade is 1/40 (2.42?%) and downhill is 1/33.

Here is a shot of one of the local GM variants, in this case on one of the 6,000t test trains, at Baalbone Colliery (currently closed). Normally four of these units pull a 4,500t train.

[img]http://img13.imageshack.us/img13/4324/baalbone.jpg[/img]

And a few of the local AC44 variant. Usually three of these will pull a 4,600t train through the Blue Mountains, although these belong to a Hunter Valley based company, not the Blue Mountains based one. These ones are on the branch of the Baalbone mine on secret business. Wink

[img]http://img826.imageshack.us/img826/2618/dg0y.jpg[/img]
Grantham
  JimYarin Chief Commissioner

Location: Adelaide, South Australia
ken

would you care to describe the images you posted and the locomotives?
  wally-wowser1 Train Controller

Location: overlooking the Mt vic washaway on Soldiers Pinch
Xstrata ordered over 1000 coal wagons  about 3 years ago , built in China & shipped to Newcastle NSW over a period of time . At present they only operate 6 rakes of 96 wagons so had to store  the excess wagons somewhere , Pommy company Freightliner has a contract to supply manpower &  certification to Xstrata but as most of their employees are only qualified to work in the Hunter Valley.   Freightliner has a contract for cotton  from Narrabri & also  some where  out past Dubbo which is operated by another section of Freightliner.

   The secret business hint is that the Xstrata mine near Lithgow  is in care &  at present is consider a relative secure area to store excess wagons . These wagons were hit  by the spray can idiots over a period of time .

Grantham is not a employee of Xstrata but he was nominated to Pilot any moves required  by Xstrata /Freightliner  on the Mudgee branch & on the mine branch. These photo's  show the  first rake of wagons being checked for fitness to travel back to Newcastle so that another rake can be readied for service  in the near future .


 Due to previous ideas  by RIC & others to remove most sideings where wagons  etc  can be stored it is a monumental effort to find any place  for a large amount of wagons to be suitable , maybe the tide will turn &  space will be provided  for storage  as the future of the HV coal chain is looking  very rosey  for increased movements  for the world's largest coal export terminal.

 Wally.
  Grantham Minister for Railways

Location: I'm with stupid!
Thanks for putting the pics up, ndenver. Smile

M
  JimYarin Chief Commissioner

Location: Adelaide, South Australia
Due to previous ideas  by RIC & others to remove most sideings where wagons  etc  can be stored it is a monumental effort to find any place  for a large amount of wagons to be suitable , maybe the tide will turn &  space will be provided  for storage  as the future of the HV coal chain is looking  very rosey  for increased movements  for the world's largest coal export terminal.

 Wally.
wally-wowser1

where would these wagons have usually been stored had there been space? i note from artc documentation there is still yard space at goulburn and various points on the main south or there used to be. i guess the issues are north of sydney?

and ndenver thanks for posting.
  Grantham Minister for Railways

Location: I'm with stupid!
where would these wagons have usually been stored had there been space? i note from artc documentation there is still yard space at goulburn and various points on the main south or there used to be. i guess the issues are north of sydney?

and ndenver thanks for posting.
JimYarin
There are no long term storage facilities for many hundreds of wagons. Most yards are congested enough as it is, so closed mines and closed branch lines tend to be the best alternatives.
  awsgc24 Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney
It would be interesting to know what are the:
* rail weight
* type and frequency of sleepers (ties)
* gradients
* curvature

of the USA, Pilbara (AUS), and other Australian (AUS) railways.
  awsgc24 Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney
There are no long term storage facilities for many hundreds of wagons. Most yards are congested enough as it is, so closed mines and closed branch lines tend to be the best alternatives.
Grantham
Suggestion:

build extra sidings at Thirlmere at the Rail Transport Museum.
  Fireman Dave Chief Commissioner

Location: Shh, I'm hiding
Suggestion:

build extra sidings at Thirlmere at the Rail Transport Museum.
"awsgc24"


Where? There's not a lot of room there, and if there was it would be better used for heritage stock.
  speedemon08 Mary

Location: I think by now you should have figured it out
It would be interesting to know what are the:
* rail weight
* type and frequency of sleepers (ties)
* gradients
* curvature

of the USA, Pilbara (AUS), and other Australian (AUS) railways.
awsgc24
I suspect the Pilbara adheres to US heavy rail standards, since the units generally are somewhat lightly modified US domestic versions.
  jimmyg540 Beginner

Location: Victoria, WA
BHP Billition in the Pilbara region of Western Australia run Iron Ore trains at a 40 tonne axle load on 68 kg rail. Grades are around 1.50% on the Yandi bank and Chichester Ranges and maximum speed is 75km/h.

The railway is constructed to US class one standards. Locomotives and rolling stock are off the shelf US domestic. ATP and in cab signalling is used throughout the network with exception to the Goldsworthy line and all trains are operated driver only. Consists currently run with conventional pneumatic braking. Currently ECP trials are underway with the Wabtec and Nyab overlay systems.

Current train consists are, 2 lead locos, 124 cars, 2 remotes (in Distributed Power Mode) and 124 cars for 248 cars in total. At a length of 2,560 meters or 8,398.92 ft and a maximum trailing load of 39,680 tonnes or 79,360,000 lb.    

Locomotives are primarily SD70ace and Dash8 we also use SD40-2 locos but they are now restricted to work trains. Up until a few months ago we where running GE AC6000's but these have been taken out of service.

Hope this answers a few questions  Smile        
  beyerpeacock Assistant Commissioner

Location: Gorton Foundry
Why have the AC6000's been taken out of service, if I may ask?
  jimmyg540 Beginner

Location: Victoria, WA
The AC6000 locos have been withdrawn from service and offered for sale and will be sent overseas shortly.
Reliability issues, availability of spare parts and being a somewhat small fleet has spelled an early end for the remaining locos.
Shame to see them go they weren't a bad loco to work on

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