Weathering SAR sheep or cattle wagons

 
  SAR523 Assistant Commissioner

Location: Chicago, IL
Does anyone happen to have a colour photo of an SAR C or S bogie wagon (or the f variant)? Broad or narrow gauge, doesn't matter, preferably in grey but I'll take ANR red as long as its in service (eg not the rake sitting in Quorn).

I've assembled a few of the very nice Model Etch kits but have been dithering on weathering for lack of a good reference photo. There are a few B&W ones around but they're obviously of limited use other than indicating that the wood clearly faded as you'd expect.

If nothing else, does anyone recall how they were cleaned? If they were washed out with Lime then I'd guess that i should be adding some white streaking on top of a usual weathering job.

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  hosk1956 Deputy Commissioner

Location: no where near gunzels
Does anyone happen to have a colour photo of an SAR C or S bogie wagon (or the f variant)? Broad or narrow gauge, doesn't matter, preferably in grey but I'll take ANR red as long as its in service (eg not the rake sitting in Quorn).

I've assembled a few of the very nice Model Etch kits but have been dithering on weathering for lack of a good reference photo. There are a few B&W ones around but they're obviously of limited use other than indicating that the wood clearly faded as you'd expect.

If nothing else, does anyone recall how they were cleaned? If they were washed out with Lime then I'd guess that i should be adding some white streaking on top of a usual weathering job.
SAR523

They were just washed out with water, no soap and scrubbing! Smile
And I can't remember a pressure pump being used, it was just like a fire hose pressure. That was an area I steered clear off when they were washing out, the smell and mess was atrocious.

Tell me SAR, have any American friends seen the ME products, have they made any comments about our models? that sort of etching is something I imagine they wouldn't see much off.

Sorry, no photos though, only memories, which I hope to use when I do mine, the timber work was kept in good condition, and any broken boards were replaced so faded paint work with an occasional freshly painted/replaced lower board (within hoof kicking distance) and I think I will just dry brush some streaks of lighter colours (white, light grey, light tan etc) on the side sills, but that is from memory.

Wayne
  allan Chief Commissioner

The vast majority of colour photos of these wagons (including mine) were taken after they had been withdrawn from service, while they were stored waiting cutting up.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/60901191@N08/sets/72157630230773844/ is a good example.

There are a very few earlier photos that show wagons in remarkably good nick...

http://westonlangford.com/media/photos/104306.jpg
  allan Chief Commissioner

Now, I don't know why the url for Norm Bray's photos will not show, but I'll try again...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/60901191@N08/sets/72157630230773844/

And it still won't work!

Try http://www.flickr.com/photos/60901191@N08/sets/ and scroll down to the set "SAR CR ANR Stock Wagons".
  TheBlacksmith Chief Commissioner

Location: Ankh Morpork
Tell me SAR, have any American friends seen the ME products, have they made any comments about our models? that sort of etching is something I imagine they wouldn't see much off.
hosk1956

The American modellers are fast becoming a race of plonkers, very few would have the ability to assemble an etched model. And they don't have many etched kits over there either because although there are hundreds of etching companies, they are all up themselves. They all want to be doing defence work, and have minimum runs of like 250 sheets! Not one would do a single sheet to allow checking of the design.

It was a sad day when we lost Model Etch, as there are no companies here doing decent work any more.
  SAR523 Assistant Commissioner

Location: Chicago, IL
Cheers Wayne & Allen.

I have received a few compliments when I show photos of the model etch kits. They are impressive and you are right that there is little that is widely available over here that compares.

The one thing that has been successful over here is the Eureka Garrett. Without exaggeration it feels like every third or fourth person has at least one and sometimes more. There are a lot of people who just like Garretts and then there are people who just like the model.

Back on the wagons - how did the pre-60s dark grey scheme chip? I can see the darker grey under the peeling paint of lighter grey wagons and then the lighter grey under peeling red. Was there a noticeably different primer or did it just go straight to the wood / metal?
  nscaler69 Deputy Commissioner

Location: There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots.
Are any of the pictures in this set any help? SAR CR ANR Stock Wagons
  hosk1956 Deputy Commissioner

Location: no where near gunzels
Are any of the pictures in this set any help? SAR CR ANR Stock Wagons
nscaler69

I don't know about SAR but they will help me, I am doing some sheep vans at the moment, admittedly they are of a later era than I am modelling, but I might have to put a bit more rust around the doors into my weathering.
Regard the paint overs SAR, the initial dark grey would have been over primed timber, the later light grey then red then green would have been straight over whatever was there with very little preperation other than a hose down and scrape off any flaking rust or loose paint.
Photos of the dark grey era are a little hard to find but I have the impression the paint work lasted in a better condition than the later repaints.

Wayne
  SAR523 Assistant Commissioner

Location: Chicago, IL
Thanks Wayne - was the primer colour consistent / known?

Judging by the buffers, this photo http://wiki.prov.vic.gov.au/index.php/VPRS_12800_P4_RS_0438 probably is of a dark gray subject and the wood looks like it is fading or is aggressivley chipped. The effect is far less pronounced here: http://wiki.prov.vic.gov.au/index.php/VPRS_12800_P4_RS_0437 and is concentrated around where someone would have had to clamer on to open the central latches so is probably chipping rather than fading.
  Iain Chief Commissioner

Location: Concord, NSW
Just a comment on Mr Foundry's post surely there must be American companies doing etch details for tanks, aircraft or ships. As I recall there was one that was doing a etched brass kit of a Giant Hammer Head Crane (and whose website made me feel like Mark Bau) and there was another I think that was doing 1/700 model trains and port infrastructure.

Iain
  TheBlacksmith Chief Commissioner

Location: Ankh Morpork
Just a comment on Mr Foundry's post surely there must be American companies doing etch details for tanks, aircraft or ships. As I recall there was one that was doing a etched brass kit of a Giant Hammer Head Crane (and whose website made me feel like Mark Bau) and there was another I think that was doing 1/700 model trains and port infrastructure.

Iain
Iain

I have a friend in LA who was having his etched work done by Model Etch through me. Since Tony closed down, he has been searching all over the US to find a replacement etcher, and has finally found one. But not before going through literally hundreds of companies who would not talk to him, or wanted too much money or had ridiculous minimum runs.
  SAR523 Assistant Commissioner

Location: Chicago, IL
I have a friend in LA who was having his etched work done by Model Etch through me. Since Tony closed down, he has been searching all over the US to find a replacement etcher, and has finally found one. But not before going through literally hundreds of companies who would not talk to him, or wanted too much money or had ridiculous minimum runs.
"TheBlacksmith"


I hadn't heard that Tony had shutdown completely; that would be a tremendous loss. However your general sentiment about plonkers has merit. I know people who still scratchbuild the odd loco and of course there are the armor, aircraft and ship modellers who build kits and use the most amazing photo etch pieces (which seem to be mostly Japanese in origin). However the bulk of the train people I know would be strictly RTR. Although to be fair the prices are quite different here. By waiting a little bit and shopping around I can buy a 6 pack of decent RTR Athaern hoppers for under $10each *new*. That's close to the cost of buying the kadee couplers and metal wheels separately (although they are -110 wheels and McHenry couplers on these particular models).
  K-Class Chief Train Controller

Location: Melbourne
The US like Australia has a lot of "plonkers" but it does have a large number or people who make very high detailed models, probably more that the total number of train modelers than in Australia.

Most the high detail US modelers dont build much from scratch unless they are modeling some thing very old or some very small railway. Most start with a basic RTR model and then add details and then do remarkable realistic weathering/graffiti paint jobs. The US has a large number of small to medium size companies that produce white metal/brass/injected molded detail parts and a number or new companies using milling machines to make replacement ends and doors for existing RTR models to make other variations.

Getting back on topic the SAR spent much more time with maintenance than the ANR and AN and would repaint wagons more often and so the wagons would have always looked fresher than they did from the 70's onwards.

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