High Voltage - split from seaford line SA

 
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
[edit] Split from Seaford Line
http://www.railpage.com.au/f-t11377222-0-asc-s75.htm
[/edit]


Just for everyones info .........
High Voltage is defined as levels greater than 1,000Volt AC and 1,500Volt DC
Low Voltage is defined as levels between 50 and 1,000Volt AC and between 120 and 1,500V Dc
Extra Low Voltage is defined as levels below 50V AC and 120V DC
No mention of any "Extra High Voltage"
These definitions are set by the International Electrotechnical Commission (not stupid electricians)

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  steam4ian Chief Commissioner

Sorry I use the electronics terms where 240/415 is HV, and the overhead is EHV. Nothing with the ability to kill should be described as Low Voltage, stupid electricians and their terms. I really doubt the signals are 24V DC.

But given the entire signal head is potentially at 25KV it's a moot point.

I'd say it's thieves, upgrading anything draws vandals and thieves out of the woodwork. Idiots who never gave a street light a second glance can decide to break it the instant you install new light fixtures to the top. See there are people just as petty and destructive as many of your comments on this forum.
fabricator

24 Vdc is ELV up to 110 Vdc.

Up to 1000 Vac is LV

In Australian terms 1000 Vac and over is HV.

Anywhere else 1000 Vac to 36 kVac is MV.
  Aaron The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: University of Adelaide SA
Here's one for you Ian, don't mess with the big volts kiddies...

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-04-04/power-cuts-after-fire-near-hazelwood-power-station/5366722
  Aaron The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: University of Adelaide SA
Sorry I use the electronics terms
"fabricator"
Or perhaps not?

where 240/415 is HV
"fabricator"
So you never seen a low voltage distribution box with seemingly ironic "Danger Low Voltage 415V" printed on them? Next time I see one will photograph it for your benefit.
  steam4ian Chief Commissioner

Aaron

Thank you for the link, most impressive. I don't know why it kept going for so long, most faults are off on milliseconds.
I have seen footage of an air break switch, not a circuit breaker opening under load and that is a good watch. Being just and switch it draws an incredible arc that snakes all over the place, finally it goes between phases or to earth and then the protection system can see it and the circuit breaker trips.

My pet aversion is low voltage distribution boards labelled "Danger High Voltage". Even more concerning when it is only the cupboard with a metal enclosed switchboard in it with IP21 of any live parts and intended for normal circuit isolation.

Don't get me started on high voltage switching procedures where arc fault contained switchgear is installed but operators are required to "dress up" before using it.

The present hysteria about Arc Flash comes from the USA that never had standards for arcing fault containment like us and the Europeans have had for about 40 years.

Ian
  fabricator Chief Commissioner

Location: Gawler
Or perhaps not?

So you never seen a low voltage distribution box with seemingly ironic "Danger Low Voltage 415V" printed on them? Next time I see one will photograph it for your benefit.
Aaron

Oh Aaron, Pressman, and Ian there is a difference between electronics and electrical, perhaps you should consider I made that distinction for a reason ?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_voltage

Low voltage is a relative term, the definition varying by context. Different definitions are used in electric power transmission and distribution, and in the electronics industry.


Seems only the International Electrotechnical Commission standard applies to Electrical power supply industry definitions. No doubt it's a written by committee type standard, written years or decades after the fact.

See below for the other two two versions.

The US National Electrical Code
Electrical power distribution industry definitions

In the context of electrical power distribution, the United States 2005 National Electrical Code (NEC) defines low (distribution system) voltage as 0 - 49 volts. Low Distribution (system voltage) is covered by 250.20(A) of this code.
The NFPA standard 79 article 6.4.1.1 defines distribution PELV as nominal voltage of 30 Vrms or 60 Vdc ripple free for dry locations and 6 Vrms or 15 Vdc in all other cases.

and the Electronics industry itself

Electronics design and manufacturing industry definition
UL standard 508A article 43 (Table 43.1) defines 0-20V peak/ 5A or 20.1-42.4V peak/ 100VA as Low-Voltage Limited Energy circuits.

Pull apart an old CRT monitor/tv, heatsinks labeled as high voltage (usually 400V DC), and the EHT (later EHV) voltages from the ~23KV flyback tranformer. I'll leave you to figure out what EHT stands for.

Yes it is a mess, but it's far easier to relabel a few metal boxes and tranformers than to redraft entire schematics and replace warnings printed onto PCBs and heatsinks. Therefore if a uniform standard is to ever be arrived at it's the electrical industry that needs the shake up. Heck my meter box has not voltage warnings, the only mention is the stats for the solar inverter which has some voltages on it.

I hate seeing anything labelled as high voltage, without stating what the actual voltage is. Big difference between 3 phase 415V at high currents and a 240V 50 amp sub panel, given current is also a safety factor, why not label that as well ?
  SAR526 Chief Train Controller

Location: Adelaide, South Australia.
Oh Aaron, Pressman, and Ian there is a difference between electronics and electrical, perhaps you should consider I made that distinction for a reason ?
fabricator

I would suggest that signs made for the protection of the general public should be in ENGLISH, not TechSpeak. Any voltage that has the potential to kill should be labelled DANGEROUS and also HIGH VOLTAGE.

It would be simple (too simple for TechHeads?) to add the voltage underneath e.g. 240vAC, 750vDC or 25kVAC.
  nm39 Chief Commissioner

Location: By a road taking pictures
I would suggest that signs made for the protection of the general public should be in ENGLISH, not TechSpeak. Any voltage that has the potential to kill should be labelled DANGEROUS and also HIGH VOLTAGE.

It would be simple (too simple for TechHeads?) to add the voltage underneath e.g. 240vAC, 750vDC or 25kVAC.
SAR526

Why not go for the Strine equivalent: wotchadedoambeyecha. (Watch out he does not bite you.)
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
I would suggest that signs made for the protection of the general public should be in ENGLISH, not TechSpeak. Any voltage that has the potential to kill should be labelled DANGEROUS and also HIGH VOLTAGE.

It would be simple (too simple for TechHeads?) to add the voltage underneath e.g. 240vAC, 750vDC or 25kVAC.
SAR526

I agree with you SAR526 as some fools around today use too much tech speak and confuse the average punter. Using the K.I.S.S (Keep It Simple Stupid) principle is still the best way to go in the end!
  justapassenger Minister for Railways

I would suggest that signs made for the protection of the general public should be in ENGLISH, not TechSpeak. Any voltage that has the potential to kill should be labelled DANGEROUS and also HIGH VOLTAGE.

It would be simple (too simple for TechHeads?) to add the voltage underneath e.g. 240vAC, 750vDC or 25kVAC.
"SAR526"
Agree - consideration has to be made about who the warning is intended for.

The average punter has their own definition of low/high voltage which is different again to any definitions from the electric/electronic industries in Australia/Britain/Europe/Mars/USA - and would usually be something along the lines of batteries are low voltage, anything that can kill is high voltage. Yes it's ignorant, but to be on the safe side of ignorant is better than being confused by technical definitions being used without first ensuring a shared understanding of the terms.

For the same reason, I don't mind the DPTI's Stay Switched On rail safety campaign (a well-executed campaign thanks to it being put together by experts in marketing and education, not by engineers) referring to the new EMUs travelling at high speed, despite the conventional definition of high speed rail being a 250 km/h cruising speed on new build lines and a 200 km/h cruising speed on upgraded classic lines. In the unlikely event we ever get actual high speed rail in South Australia (the only route which could possibly support it would be Adelaide-Melbourne, and mainly for EuroTunnel-style vehicle shuttles than for passenger trains) it will be so far into the future that the current Stay Switched On campaign will be long forgotten by that point.
  fabricator Chief Commissioner

Location: Gawler
Agree - consideration has to be made about who the warning is intended for.

The average punter has their own definition of low/high voltage which is different again to any definitions from the electric/electronic industries in Australia/Britain/Europe/Mars/USA - and would usually be something along the lines of batteries are low voltage, anything that can kill is high voltage.
justapassenger


You DO NOT represent the electronics community at all. I already quoted a source that the US electronics industry consider HV to be anything over 50VDC. See below for more and some evidence that the EU also consider things differently with electronics.

I did try to find the Australian standards, oddly searching for "Australian electronics standards" or the like has google change the search to "electrical". Best I can find so far is ACMA stuff which is telecoms and generic Australia standards info. Cannot seem to find who maintains electronics industry documents, I'll ask around about that.

The underwriters laboratory (UL) standards for electronic devices, which is the US standard.
While the standards themselves are available for a fee, there are easy ways to see the basic ideas.

Like say this recent patent
http://www.google.com/patents/US8638539
Typically, Underwriters Laboratories considers lower voltage circuits, typically 42.5VDC or less and 30VAC or less, to be contactable by a person.

24VDC is a very common operating voltage in lighting controls, so it is common to find the relay coil being driven from a 24V supply. Most commercial relays are Underwriters Laboratories listed or rated for common U.S. operating voltages, e.g., 120VAC or 277VAC, because the physical spacing between the low voltage coil and the high voltage relay contacts meets Underwriters Laboratories spacing requirements

Seems pretty obvious to me, UL consider 24V DC to me LV, and 120VAC or 277VAC to be HV. In the US having stuff in your house that doesn't meet Underwriters Laboratories standards means the insurance won't pay out if the device was the cause of the fire.

How about the repair instructions for an air-conditioner sold in the Netherlands ?
http://www.carrier.nl/~/media/Product_pdfs/42-serie/42NQV-G/04-Bediening-OM/storingscodes.ashx
... voltage between + – terminals of the C14 (“CAUTION HIGH VOLTAGE” is indicated.) electrolytic capacitor
(500μF/400V or 760mF/400V) on P.C. board ...

Labelled on the PCB inside a metal box, inside the air conditioner cabinet, where the customer couldn't get to it. And yet clearly Carrier consider 400V to be high voltage, better go tell one of the world's largest air conditioning companies they have it wrong.

I'm sure somewhere I have a heatsink that is live with 400VDC on it that is either stamped or sticked with high voltage warnings.
  Aaron The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: University of Adelaide SA
Oh Aaron, Pressman, and Ian there is a difference between electronics and electrical, perhaps you should consider I made that distinction for a reason ?


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_voltage



Seems only the International Electrotechnical Commission standard applies to Electrical power supply industry definitions. No doubt it's a written by committee type standard, written years or decades after the fact.

See below for the other two two versions.

The US National Electrical Code

and the Electronics industry itself


Pull apart an old CRT monitor/tv, heatsinks labeled as high voltage (usually 400V DC), and the EHT (later EHV) voltages from the ~23KV flyback tranformer. I'll leave you to figure out what EHT stands for.

Yes it is a mess, but it's far easier to relabel a few metal boxes and tranformers than to redraft entire schematics and replace warnings printed onto PCBs and heatsinks. Therefore if a uniform standard is to ever be arrived at it's the electrical industry that needs the shake up. Heck my meter box has not voltage warnings, the only mention is the stats for the solar inverter which has some voltages on it.

I hate seeing anything labelled as high voltage, without stating what the actual voltage is. Big difference between 3 phase 415V at high currents and a 240V 50 amp sub panel, given current is also a safety factor, why not label that as well ?
"fabricator"
Firstly, I don't believe anyone here 'represents' an industry despite what you might think JAP is saying. I can tell you this, Ian has clearly derived a substantial part of his lifetime's earnings from working in what I would regard as the 'electrical' side of the field, and I am for the most part totally trained in what I regard as the 'electronics' sector. He and I (and Pressman whom I think is 'electrical' too) all manage to be on the same page on this. I see it as you that seems to have the warped definition, as for quoting US electrical specs at me, I have exactly zero respect for US wiring codes and as this is a discussion in Australia I think we're best to stick to the local definitions which Ian and Pressman have accurately recorded.

Relabelling a few metal boxes? Guess what, your metal distro box at your house is no orphan at not carrying a label. I would suggest respectively that you consider throwing the CRTs in the bin if you have a problem with their EHT labelling, A LOT LESS effort (and let's not even consider the cost saving) involved in that than relabelling (or even labelling) EVERY residential, commercial, industrial 'metal box' in the country. By all means go and relabel every metal box, and whilst you are at it, don't forget to also check all the isolation clearances at the various imperial standard built installations throughout the country and stretch them out to meet the metric clearance while you're at it. Several minutes work at most surely?
  Aaron The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: University of Adelaide SA
Here's some practical legal compliance for you Fabricator, I was part of team designing a switching regulator, I just went and dug out my copies of the compliance paper work. The first stage of the regulator takes the raw input from wall mains, be that 110 or 230VAC and immediately full wave rectifies this straight to a DC rail, giving us the best part of 400VDC at peak. This then has all sorts of processes conducted on it to produce the various power levels required on the output, suffice to say all are likely under 50VDC. So is this product which carries international compliance for AU, EU and the US complied as a 'HV' device because it contains 'HV' by your definition? ... ... Nup, it's complied as a 'LV' because the peak voltages are less than 1000VAC and 1500VDC, but what would I know? I only built the thing and got it complied...
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
Firstly, I don't believe anyone here 'represents' an industry despite what you might think JAP is saying. I can tell you this, Ian has clearly derived a substantial part of his lifetime's earnings from working in what I would regard as the 'electrical' side of the field, and I am for the most part totally trained in what I regard as the 'electronics' sector. He and I (and Pressman whom I think is 'electrical' too) all manage to be on the same page on this. I see it as you that seems to have the warped definition, as for quoting US electrical specs at me, I have exactly zero respect for US wiring codes and as this is a discussion in Australia I think we're best to stick to the local definitions which Ian and Pressman have accurately recorded.
"Aaron"

Yes Aaron, just over 39 years in the trade, started out rewinding ac and dc motors and have had the opportunity to work with a couple of companies that dealt in a huge variety of electrical work including Heavy Marine, Heavy Industry (printing, cardboard, engineering) Grain Handling, Food Industry, Wine and Beverage industry and recently delving into Mining industry machinery. Everything from machine control, plant control panel design and manufacturing to PLC's
I have dealt with equipment from all around the world, and as you I have little respect for the US wiring code, as Australian and European are in my mind far superior. (Personally the Lloyd's Register would be the most stringent I've come across )

Someone earlier said "batteries are low voltage, anything that can kill is high voltage."
There is at least one Commercial office building in the Adelaide CBD that has 220Vdc emergency lighting supplied from Batteries ......... that voltage will kill!
(I say one building because I used to do emergency lighting maintenance in that building only)

OK after all that maybe our illustrious Snow Lord Moderater might consider splitting all this voltage talk into a new thread as we have all managed to once again de-rail the thread from it's original topic, which is still an ongoing subject on it's own.
  steam4ian Chief Commissioner

On topic

Saw a 6 car set of 3000s pass SASMEE this afternoon, it was not a regular movement and was going slower than a regular train which passed through about 5 mins later. I suspected not all the cars were powered at the time.

Off topic

The real terminology has been proposed by Brian 526 that is "Dangerous Voltage"

The Standards set out signage for switchboards, switch rooms and distribution board cupboards, the wording of such signage must be consistent with other Standards.

High voltage in Australia implies specialist training in high voltage switching beyond that applied to your A class electrician.  Hence cupboards and switchboards should NOT use the words High Voltage. To do so means nobody can reset an earth leakage circuit breaker unless having HV training and wearing appropriate PPE and having prepared a switching plan and having a check to witness the procedure.

Back on topic the operators of the HV switching on the Seaford line need special training and procedures not something that should be applied to the distribution board in your average office and commercial building.

on and off topic
Ian.
  Aaron The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: University of Adelaide SA
Yes Aaron, just over 39 years in the trade, started out rewinding ac and dc motors and have had the opportunity to work with a couple of companies that dealt in a huge variety of electrical work including Heavy Marine, Heavy Industry (printing, cardboard, engineering) Grain Handling, Food Industry, Wine and Beverage industry and recently delving into Mining industry machinery. Everything from machine control, plant control panel design and manufacturing to PLC's
I have dealt with equipment from all around the world, and as you I have little respect for the US wiring code, as Australian and European are in my mind far superior. (Personally the Lloyd's Register would be the most stringent I've come across )
"Pressman"
Yeah, my 'electrical' was more an indication of my thoughts that you had experience in big power gear.

My dislike of the US code is more to do with their complete lack of regulation as to who gets to do the work. Sure their mains might be 110VAC, but even if the same was supplied here, I would doubt we'd allow 'anyone' to do their own mains wiring.

Someone earlier said "batteries are low voltage, anything that can kill is high voltage."
There is at least one Commercial office building in the Adelaide CBD that has 220Vdc emergency lighting supplied from Batteries ......... that voltage will kill!
(I say one building because I used to do emergency lighting maintenance in that building only)
"Pressman"
Batteries are also used to propel DE submarines, you wouldn't want to disrespect them either.
  gmanning1 Junior Train Controller

Location: Sydney
I've worked with DC-DC convertors which regulate via constant current and could ramp up 48VDC battery supply to many 1000's VDC in an o/c condition.
  Aaron The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: University of Adelaide SA
I've worked with DC-DC convertors which regulate via constant current and could ramp up 48VDC battery supply to many 1000's VDC in an o/c condition.
gmanning1

That's what constant current does.
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
It is not so much the voltage that is the killer though but the amperage of it. A Van Der Graaf generator for example can be millions of volts enough to make lightning, but the amperage is that low as to be almost negligible. I used one years back in science class and could touch the dome on it others could not though. But putting warnings onto things for the average punter the words high voltage strike's a bit of fear into them and so stop them mucking about with things.

I have even had people a little wary about buying a train set transformer controller for a model train. They used batteries because it was safe is what they told me. They did not like the idea of 240 volts coming into contact with junior or his train set. You then have to go through a very long winded explanation of how a transformer works etc and explain to them that in side the case there is no physical connection between the 12 volt out put and the 240 input to it. They seem to think that all that is done is some electronics or something are inside that simply reduces the 240 input to 12 volts. When you get confronted with one like this you do not even go into the differences between AC and DC . I had one recently at the NRM that I had to tell but he would not accept any of it, so he kept using batteries.

The average punter on most things has got no idea at all. You only have to come into contact with the public in places like the NRM or similar to see it though. Safety and a lot of other things according to most punters are someone else's worry not their's! Trouble is they are very good at then blaming whoever for their troubles in the end when something happens. If they took a bit of time to look at things more fully they would realise how dangerous certain things are that they might do every day. Even using a simple instrument like a knife can be fraught with danger, there is a right way and a wrong way, but most do not accept these things. In the end the onus comes down to the individual and if not it should. If you are doing something dangerous and you know it, then you yourself must accept the responsibility for it. Unfortunately today Lawyers and courts are all too willing to find some scapegoat or excuse for this kind of behaviour!
  TheLoadedDog The Ghost of George Stephenson

You DO NOT represent the electronics community at all. I already quoted a source that the US electronics industry consider HV to be anything over 50VDC. See below for more and some evidence that the EU also consider things differently with electronics.

I did try to find the Australian standards, oddly searching for "Australian electronics standards" or the like has google change the search to "electrical". Best I can find so far is ACMA stuff which is telecoms and generic Australia standards info. Cannot seem to find who maintains electronics industry documents, I'll ask around about that.

The underwriters laboratory (UL) standards for electronic devices, which is the US standard.
While the standards themselves are available for a fee, there are easy ways to see the basic ideas.

Like say this recent patent
http://www.google.com/patents/US8638539

Seems pretty obvious to me, UL consider 24V DC to me LV, and 120VAC or 277VAC to be HV. In the US having stuff in your house that doesn't meet Underwriters Laboratories standards means the insurance won't pay out if the device was the cause of the fire.

How about the repair instructions for an air-conditioner sold in the Netherlands ?
http://www.carrier.nl/~/media/Product_pdfs/42-serie/42NQV-G/04-Bediening-OM/storingscodes.ashx

Labelled on the PCB inside a metal box, inside the air conditioner cabinet, where the customer couldn't get to it. And yet clearly Carrier consider 400V to be high voltage, better go tell one of the world's largest air conditioning companies they have it wrong.

I'm sure somewhere I have a heatsink that is live with 400VDC on it that is either stamped or sticked with high voltage warnings.
fabricator

Bollocks.
  Aaron The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: University of Adelaide SA
It is not so much the voltage that is the killer though but the amperage of it. A Van Der Graaf generator for example can be millions of volts enough to make lightning, but the amperage is that low as to be almost negligible. I used one years back in science class and could touch the dome on it others could not though. But putting warnings onto things for the average punter the words high voltage strike's a bit of fear into them and so stop them mucking about with things.
"David Peters"
If you don't have potential difference where do you source current? Labelling by voltage is not for 'fear' factor, it's because labelling a high energy power connector '2A' is meaningless and makes no suggestion whatsoever as to what will happen when you touch it. Labelling a source as 'high voltage' etc at least suggests that there is sufficient potential that if you are dumb enough to get close to it a lethal number of electrons are going to make their way from the conductor, through you and down to ground killing you.

Clearly you must have gone to fabricator's electrical school, which was adequately and accurately described above.
  Aaron The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: University of Adelaide SA
I have even had people a little wary about buying a train set transformer controller for a model train. They used batteries because it was safe is what they told me. They did not like the idea of 240 volts coming into contact with junior or his train set. You then have to go through a very long winded explanation of how a transformer works etc and explain to them that in side the case there is no physical connection between the 12 volt out put and the 240 input to it. They seem to think that all that is done is some electronics or something are inside that simply reduces the 240 input to 12 volts. When you get confronted with one like this you do not even go into the differences between AC and DC . I had one recently at the NRM that I had to tell but he would not accept any of it, so he kept using batteries.
"David Peters"
This is a neat example of why we label by voltage and not current, and you if you truly believed what you posted in the first paragraph ought to think like your friend. A potentially leathal electrical current is somewhere around 30mA out of our mains, the current required to induce fibrillation and death (generally) decreases with frequency. You should be mightily scared of an everyday DC train controller delivering 2A to the track, that's about four times the leathal DC current, a DCC system up around 8-10kHz frequency and 5A capacity is about 150+ times the lethal current level.

Here's the thing though, the human body's natural impedance (unless you do something silly and intentionally circumvent your body's defense) sees that at the low VOLTAGE supplied, these currents are incapable of flowing.

That is why safety warnings are most often (and best) labelled according to potential.
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
If you don't have potential difference where do you source current? Labelling by voltage is not for 'fear' factor, it's because labelling a high energy power connector '2A' is meaningless and makes no suggestion whatsoever as to what will happen when you touch it. Labelling a source as 'high voltage' etc at least suggests that there is sufficient potential that if you are dumb enough to get close to it a lethal number of electrons are going to make their way from the conductor, through you and down to ground killing you.
"Aaron"


Agreed, labelling with current is next to useless.
Take a transmisson line 33kV to 415V step down transformer, for example if it's secondary windings supply 415 Volt at 500 amp, then the primary current draw on the 33kV side would be in the manner of "only" 5 amps.

The Human body has very different reactions to High Voltage and Low Voltage, yes both will Kill, but in a different way but I don't think I'll go into the gory details.

I have even had people a little wary about buying a train set transformer controller for a model train. They used batteries because it was safe is what they told me. They did not like the idea of 240 volts coming into contact with junior or his train set................
DavidPeters"

If one does not feel safe with electrical then thats their choice. It's far better to be warry than be blaise.
I've always held the opinion that a person who knows a "little" about electrical work is often the most dangerous (e.g. Non-qualified workers, DIY'ers, idiots, etc. )
They simply think they know it all and are oblivious to the real dangers, a qualified tradesperson will know the dangers and treat electrical equipment with the respect it deserves.
The person you mention is exercising the safer option, "I don't know, so I won't try"
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
True about the safe option Tony but how many like this will still plug in and turn on an electrical appliance of one sort or the other though at home without worrying about anything because they do it every day. Even turning on a light can be fatal in the right circumstances.

And to Aaron you seem to be the arrogant type that tries to put any one down that does not understand tech speak, so can you put what you said into plain English please! So all us other dumb punters that you seem to think we all are can understand it thanks! Not all of us are University types like you are you know!
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
If you don't have potential difference where do you source current? Labelling by voltage is not for 'fear' factor, it's because labelling a high energy power connector '2A' is meaningless and makes no suggestion whatsoever as to what will happen when you touch it. Labelling a source as 'high voltage' etc at least suggests that there is sufficient potential that if you are dumb enough to get close to it a lethal number of electrons are going to make their way from the conductor, through you and down to ground killing you.

Clearly you must have gone to fabricator's electrical school, which was adequately and accurately described above.
Aaron

If you read what I said and used a bit of grey matter to think about it mate we are both saying virtually the same thing here. What ever you mark as amps will not do a thing but mark it high voltage and all those with some common sense, although it is lacking in a lot of people these days will then not tamper with it for one reason it might kill them, which is a fear is it not, to be killed before youre time is up.

Please stop making personal attacks on people it is not needed and if you continue it I will start to report your posts. Not a threat but a promise! Disagree if you must, but be nice about it. Show us facts etc in plain English so that all us lower schooled types can understand it better as well.

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