Burkina Faso

You must be logged in to reply

  Search thread   Image gallery
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed

RAILWAY TO LINK WEST AFRICAN STATES






On 31 November 2011, Niger, Côte d’Ivoire, Benin and Burkina Faso agreed to a 2,700km new rail construction project to link the four countries. Two of the region’s main ports – Cotonou in Benin and Abidjan in Côte d’Ivoire – are to be the endpoints, with rails running the full length of Benin, continuing through Niger’s capital Niamey and Burkina Faso’s Ouagadougou, from where an existing line continues back to the coast.

According to a joint statement released in Niger, “A roadmap will be drawn up soon in order to secure financing for this important regional economic integration project and allow for construction to begin in 2014.”


 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
OUAGADOUGOU (Reuters) - A project led by Pan African Minerals to develop the Tambao manganese project in Burkina Faso will cost up to $1 billion, the chairman of holding group Timis Corporation said on Thursday, a day after receiving the government's green light.

The manganese mine in the north of Burkina Faso, near the border with Niger and Mali, is thought to contain over 100 million tonnes of the metal, used in steel production.
Tamboa, which Timis says will be the biggest manganese mine in the world, is a priority for the West African country's government as it seeks to diversify its economy away from reliance on gold and cotton.
"The Tamboa project is an integrated project with a mining component and an infrastructure component, notably through the roads, railway and the port...," said Romanian billionaire Frank Timis, whose firm controls Pan African Minerals (PAM).
"This project will happen in the next three years and will require investment of nearly $1 billion."
PAM won exploration rights for the site in 2012 but the government only granted the exploitation permit on Wednesday. Production is provisionally forecast at around 3 million tonnes a year.
Souleymane Mihin, head of PAM in Burkina Faso, said the investment would be shared out between Timis, Canadian asset management firm Dundee Corporation and natural resources fund CD Capital, without giving a breakdown.
PAM previously estimated that the total investment cost would be $650 million.
Burkina Faso's mines minister Salif Kabore said extraction from the mine was set to begin in July and that the commodity would be for sale on international markets starting from December or January 2015.
PAM's Mihin confirmed that shipments of manganese would begin by road in October. Timis said that shipments by rail would take between one to two years to start.
 
awsgc24 Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney
OUAGADOUGOU (Reuters) - A project led by Pan African Minerals to develop the Tambao manganese project in Burkina Faso will cost up to $1 billion, the chairman of holding group Timis Corporation said on Thursday, a day after receiving the government's green light.
- wanderer53


This UNHCR map shows the new line to Tambao, partly under construction with work suspended, and partially proposed.

See: http://www.unhcr.org/3dee2c3d0.html
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
OUAGADOUGOU (Reuters) - French conglomerate Bollore and Pan-African Minerals signed a memorandum of understanding on Thursday on a rail project worth $895 million, linking Abidjan in Ivory Coast to the Burkina Faso manganese deposit at Tambao.

The governments of Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso also signed the agreement for the Abijan-Kaya-Tambao railway, following a summit between both West African nations in the Burkina capital.

Pan African Minerals (PAM), controlled by Romanian billionaire Frank Timis, is developing the manganese mine at Tambao in the northeast of Burkina Faso. It plans to invest nearly $1 billion and produce some 3 million tonnes a year.

Tamboa, which Timis says will be the biggest manganese mine in the world, is a priority for Burkina Faso's government as it seeks to diversify its economy away from a reliance on gold and cotton.

Bollore will invest about 400 million euros ($535.60 million) to rehabilitate the 1,250 kilometre rail line between Ivory Coast's commercial capital and Kaya, a town north of Ouagadougou.

"This will increase capacity and enable the shipment of the manganese and also 2 million tonnes of merchandise and about 2 million passengers," said Philippe Labonne, head of Bollore Africa Logistics, the logistics arm of Bollore.

Pan-African Minerals will construct a nearly 300 km Kaya-Tambao link.

"The construction of the line will be done over the next three years. It will cost about 176 billion CFA francs ($359.32 million)," Alan Watling, Pan-African Mineral's Chief Executive said at the signing.

Work on the railway will start in August.

($1 = 489.8100 CFA francs)

($1 = 0.7468 euros)
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Bolloré Africa Logistics (BAL) is planning to invest up to €2 billion in West Africa over the next eight years in completing a 2,740 km-long rail freight ’loop’ linking the ports of Abijan, in the Ivory Coast and Lomé, in Togo via two land-locked states, Burkina Faso and Niger.

BAL’s rail company subsidiary, the Société Internationale de Transport Africain par Rail (SITARAIL) currently operates public service concessions in the Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso.

The ’loop’ project makes provision for the construction of well over 1,000 kms of new track and the renovation of existing stretches totalling 1,700 kms. This spring, work began on establising a rail link between Niger’s capital, Niamey and provisional city, Dosso - a distance of 140 kms – and which is due for completion by the end of the year.

It wil contribute to opening up inland territories and facilitate exports of mining and farming products thus boosting traffic at the ports of Abidjan, Cotonou and Lomé, Bolloré explained.

BAL is also planning to set up ’bluezones’ along the rail freight ’loop’ - dry port facilities incorporating handling and storage facilities and equipped with optic fibre networks offering internet, telephony and data access.

Meanwhile, Bolloré has declined to respond to questions put by Lloyd’s Loading List.com on the impact of the ebola virus on BAL’s business.

The unit runs the box terminals at the ports of Freetown, in Sierra Leone and Conakry, in Guinea, two of the countries worse-hit by the highly-infectious disease.

Recently-published half-year results showed BAL’s H1 revenues approached €1.25 billion, an increase of 2.2% on a comparable basis with the first six months of 2013. Its port terminal activities in a number of West African states, including Guinea, turned in good results.

Bollore ’s non-African transport and logistics unit, Bolloré Logistics, reported H1 revenues of just over €1.45 billion, also up 2.2% « benefiting notably from growth in ocean freight volumes on Europe-Asia and intra-Asia routes.

Bolloré Logistics and BAL combined generated a H1 operating income of €292million compared to €269 million a year earlier.
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Eight West African nations agreed Tuesday to $19 billion worth of infrastructure deals, with the lion's share going toward a massive road and railway project by a company in the United Arab Emirates.

Abu Dhabi's Trojan General Contracting won the $16 billion project to build roads and railways across Burkina Faso, Mali and Senegal. The company is owned by Royal Group, which is owned by Emirati businessman and Abu Dhabi royal family member Tahnoon bin Zayed Al Nahyan.
UAE companies have been aggressively expanding and investing overseas. The country sees itself as a gateway connecting Africa and the Middle East with Asia, and Asia with Europe. Backed by its oil wealth, the UAE has itself rapidly evolved in just a few decades from a nation of poor fishing villages into the one of the region's leading investment hubs with modern infrastructure, skyscrapers and mega highways in Abu Dhabi and Dubai.
"Dubai is today the center of business. ... The UAE is a real reference of growth and progress," said Benin's President Thomas Yani Boyi at the signing ceremony held in Dubai. "We have a lot of natural resources and wealth in our countries."
He described the projects announced at the investment conference as the beginning of "a Marshall Plan" for West Africa.
The investment forum brought to Dubai the eight heads of state of the West African Economic and Monetary Union, which groups together Benin, Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, Mali, Niger, Senegal, Togo and Guinea-Bissau. The bloc represents a combined population of around 100 million people.
A total of 16 agreements were signed at the investment forum. Other projects cover a range of sectors such as energy and food security.
Benin, Guinea Bissau and Niger agreed to a nearly $2 billion project that includes roads, a bridge, airport and a thermal power plant by Essar Projects, the UAE subsidiary of India's Essar Group.
The Oman-based Hasan Juma Backer Trading and Contracting secured a $700 million dry-port development project in Ivory Coast.
Ahmad Abdulkarim Julfar, the CEO of the telecom company Etisalat, which operates in West Africa with a 53 percent share in Maroc Telecom, told The Associated Press that despite the high risks associated with investing in an often politically unstable region, there is also a huge potential for growth and expansion there. Etisalat is 60 percent owned by the UAE and operates in a number of African countries.
"We have started to see signs of improvement in governance in some of these countries," he said. "Etisalat has been a successful ambassador for the UAE. ... We have a long-term view in these countries."
 

You must be logged in to reply

  Search thread   Image gallery
 
Display from: