Any info on Roco DCC sets please

 
  TheDodger45 Beginner

Hi all a newbe  and so very glad to have found such a great  site.
Let me say for a starter.
Im a late starter  well not realy true i was into  trains 45 yrs ago with the old DC still have a mixed bag of locos from that time.The Boss bless her heart has layed down the law that i need more then the computer and TV as im driving her carzy so bless her heart  with the help  of my youngest daughter they have pushed me into getting back  to my old hooby .An damm me if im not eccited  about it ,But just a little worried about going DCC my 70 yr old mind isnt to quick. So ill start off slow and ask has anyone used the Roco Advanced  Control set if so any advice  on it.Second  would Locos that are nearly 50 yr old still be suitable to confert to DCC many thanks for any help

PS hope iv done this right

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  TheBlacksmith Chief Commissioner

Location: Ankh Morpork
I will start this off by pointing out there is a topic on this page called [size=3]All you need to know about DCC -for beginners[/size] and it is very helpful in finding out how to go about working with DCC. If you can't find an answer there, then there are many people here who can help with specific subjects.

With regard to the Roco Advanced DCC system, it should be pointed out from the start that it is not a manufacturer that experienced DCC users would go to. Almost all the major model rail manufacturers have had a go at introducing their own DCC system, and almost without exception, they have stuffed it up. Probably the worst was Hornby, who managed to design a system that had more faults than good features.

The systems of choice are not ones made by model rail makers, but specialists in the field of DCC. And it is also probably true that the best control system may come from one manufacturer, while the decoder comes from another, and then certain DCC accessories come from yet another again.

Without starting an argument, the popular view is that NCE make the best control system, and probably TCS make the best decoders, while Loksound is very popular for sound equipped decoders. Some will disagree with this, but it is nevertheless a popular viewpoint.

As to fitting decoders to 50 year old models.. hmmm. I am also most likely in a similar age category to you, and have not had any difficulty adopting DCC, but I would be hesitant to do it with old models, as there are a number of pitfalls waiting.

Older models often had one terminal on the motor connected to the frame of the model, and therefore one side of the wheels, this is a killer situation for decoders, it will kill them stone dead in seconds. Both motor terminals must be isolated from the frame and the wheels.

Also, those old motors consumed more power than modern motors and this higher current can often exceed the current capability of modern decoders. In addition, older motors with permanent magnets will suffer from loss of magnetism in the magnets fitted to the motor, and that in turn raises the current required to drive the motor.

A further issue is that unless you are skilled in electronics, fitting decoders to those old models will require a degree of knowledge that you may/may not possess, whereas newer models are generally designed to accept decoders already.

It may therefore be wise to consider buying more up-to-date models, rather than use your existing ones.
  ARodH Chief Train Controller

Location: East Oakleigh, Vic
The Roco system's apparently decent, though more people are going to advocate the NCE Powercab or Digitrax Zephyr systems as it's missing some default functions.

As for your old loco's, they'll need to have DCC decoders installed and they'll have to be hardwired. How ever you'll have some where doing that is considered pointless as it's either too difficult or they'll run horribly. I suspect you'll be better off leaving them on DC, and go DCC for your new locos. Of cause if you do that it's best practise to not run both at the same time.
  Aaron The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: University of Adelaide SA
I'll generally second Mr Blacksmith's comments on DCC manufacturers, the general rule of thumb is that you shouldn't buy a dcc system made by a model manufacturer. However, like all rules there are exceptions, and Roco, Fleishmann and Marklin which all make very good product.

The Roco system will suit you well. Their hand control I think is the easiest to use on the market.
  TheDodger45 Beginner

I'll generally second Mr Blacksmith's comments on DCC manufacturers, the general rule of thumb is that you shouldn't buy a dcc system made by a model manufacturer. However, like all rules there are exceptions, and Roco, Fleishmann and Marklin which all make very good product.

The Roco system will suit you well. Their hand control I think is the easiest to use on the market.
Aaron
Thanks mate  iv heard the same from another Vic, Damm if i should believe it though would love to hear the same from a New South Welshman Laughing .Im looking for a simple setup being disabled i have to look at what i can do with what i can have   and i am liking what im reading about the Roco
  dthead Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Really try to find someone who has this system and get to try it first. Nothing like trying it before buying it.  So if someone has the Roco system,  I'd ask you to PM this user to help out. One thing is not just be shown it, YOU need to try it out as well.

Regards,
David Head
  Aaron The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: University of Adelaide SA
Trust in free settlers not fellow convicts.
  Marbelup Station Master

Location: Perth, Western Australia
I have 4 of the Roco multiMaus controllers and I think they are very good.  I use them with a Lenz DCC system so I don't have any experience of the Roco "master unit" or whatever they call it.

Mine are the model 10810, which I bought around 2007 which are "wired" not wireless.  They were my main controllers for operating sessions and general use until I started using iPhone apps (WiThrottle and TouchCab) a few years ago.  I still use the multiMauses quite a bit when I can't be bothered getting the phone out.  I also have a Lenz LH100 which I use for programming and I previously had 4 x Lenz LH90's which I "retired" after purchasing the multiMauses, due to the difficulty of selecting loco addresses and limited number of DCC functions which are easily accessible.

The reason I bought the multiMauses is that they are quite "user friendly", especially for visitors, as I can program in all the loco addresses so it is very easy to select a loco using the  buttons and drive.  If adding or changing loco details, it is only necessary to update one of the controllers and the changes can be transmitted over the Xpressnet to the other controllers, which is quite clever.  Also, they have 11 DCC functions directly accessible from the buttons without having to use a Shift key or similar.  The status of the functions F0-F10 is very clearly displayed on the LCD screen.

I also prefer the "knob" style of controller rather than push-buttons or thumbwheel, hence the original purchase of LH90 and later multiMauses.  The "centre-off" style knob is quite easy to get used to.  

I don't normally use the programming features of the multiMauses, as I find the LH100 easier in that regard.  Programming on the main (PoM) doesn't work with my combination of multiMauses and Lenz, although I believed there is a firmware update to the multuMauses which fixes that problem.
  cuplers Beginner

I'v got the roco z21 system and I must say it's a nice and easy to use controller.All you need is a tablet or mobile phone
preferably a tablet and download the free app.There are 2 controllers the basic z21 white box and the black Z21 box with a few more extra features.Below is the roco z21 website


http://www.z21.eu/en/Z21

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