Trucks Striking Rail Bridges in Melbourne

 
  Crossover Train Controller

Location: St. Albans Victoria
This seems to happen frequently and cause a great deal of disruption .
Are the truck drivers penalised in any way and if not , why not ?

Sponsored advertisement

  Nightfire Minister for Railways

Location: Gippsland
There are very heavy fines In place, for driving an over height vehicle on a road that they are not permitted on.

Recovery, clean up costs would cost a mint too.
  Gman_86 Chief Commissioner

Location: Melton, where the sparks dare not roam!
This seems to happen frequently and cause a great deal of disruption .
Are the truck drivers penalised in any way and if not , why not ?
Crossover
Yes they can be penalised, and usually are. Hefty fines and other charges can often see these drivers in court paying huge costs.

The reality is, in a lot of cases*, they are not professional truck drivers, but idiots driving rental trucks on a car license. In these cases you would likely find they are up for huge costs as most rental agreements have clauses in them stipulating that either insurance does not cover 'bridge strikes' or if it does, the excess to be paid out in these circumstances is very high, then add on any valid police charge and associated fines as well.


*NOTE, I said "a lot of cases", not all cases, I am well aware that far too many of these incidents are caused by so called 'professional truck drivers', all of whom I suggest should take up another line of work.
  Edith Chief Commissioner

Location: Line 1 from Porte de Vincennes bound for Bastille station
If they get caught.  I think in some rural locations, the truckie make a get away if possible and does not report the 'error'.
  railblogger Chief Commissioner

Location: At the back of the train, quitely doing exactly what you'd expect.
@Gman_86 these people should know the height of the vehicle they are driving.
  Lad_Porter Chief Commissioner

Location: Yarra Glen
There was another thread on this topic back in April 2015:      https://www.railpage.com.au/f-p1973214.htm
  g00r Locomotive Fireman

@Gman_86 these people should know the height of the vehicle they are driving.
railblogger
If you've never driven a larger vehicle before (i.e. 4.5 tonne moving vans), then it wouldn't even cross your mind to look out for height signs, after all for the X years you have driven a car you have always been able to get through as long as the car ahead of you could (lemmings at work!).

But when behind the wheel of a truck, you can get complacent particularly if you are frequently in different size vehicles.
Case in point: there is a food processing plant in Caulfield I used to take semis down there once a week.  In the internal roads, there was a roadway that I knew was too low to get through.  Never tried to, as it was signed.

One week I take a much smaller rigid vehicle there, and suddenly I could make that right-turn, no worries. The next day, without thinking I did the same thing and opened the trailer like a tin can.
The first bus company I worked for, the xmas before I started.. A coach full of drunk bus drivers being driven back to the depot after a xmas party.  There are only 2 coaches in the fleet that couldn't go under one particular bridge.
So the driver nor the 50 experienced guys in the back picked up on the pending doom.. A few seconds later the air con unit is sliced off the roof of the coach.

The roadside reminder lights don't help either.
Buckley St footscray has a height limit and warning lights for a 4.0 meter bridge ahead.
4.0m coaches routinely fit under there (if you go slow enough otherwise no more air con) despite warning lights flashing
Other lights are set off by trucks coming the other way, so you don't always pay attention to them.

These aren't mean to be excuses, just some rationale.
  Alco_Haulic Chief Commissioner

Location: Eating out...
@Gman_86 these people should know the height of the vehicle they are driving.
If you've never driven a larger vehicle before (i.e. 4.5 tonne moving vans), then it wouldn't even cross your mind to look out for height signs, after all for the X years you have driven a car you have always been able to get through as long as the car ahead of you could (lemmings at work!).

But when behind the wheel of a truck, you can get complacent particularly if you are frequently in different size vehicles.
Case in point: there is a food processing plant in Caulfield I used to take semis down there once a week.  In the internal roads, there was a roadway that I knew was too low to get through.  Never tried to, as it was signed.

One week I take a much smaller rigid vehicle there, and suddenly I could make that right-turn, no worries. The next day, without thinking I did the same thing and opened the trailer like a tin can.
The first bus company I worked for, the xmas before I started.. A coach full of drunk bus drivers being driven back to the depot after a xmas party.  There are only 2 coaches in the fleet that couldn't go under one particular bridge.
So the driver nor the 50 experienced guys in the back picked up on the pending doom.. A few seconds later the air con unit is sliced off the roof of the coach.

The roadside reminder lights don't help either.
Buckley St footscray has a height limit and warning lights for a 4.0 meter bridge ahead.
4.0m coaches routinely fit under there (if you go slow enough otherwise no more air con) despite warning lights flashing
Other lights are set off by trucks coming the other way, so you don't always pay attention to them.

These aren't mean to be excuses, just some rationale.
g00r
It gets even more fun when you deal with loads of changing size all the time. I've had to take loads of many sizes, widest to date has been 4.3 metres wide, 23 metres long, and highest has been 5.4 metres. I'm always on the ball when it comes to heights, simply because I have to. But many drivers that run standard tautliners all the time, are not going to think too much as long as it's more than 4.3 metres.

Sponsored advertisement

Subscribers: g00r, Nightfire

Display from:   

Quick Reply

We've disabled Quick Reply for this thread as it was last updated more than six months ago.