Tamiya Yellow acrylic - tips for spraying

 
  Gremlin Assistant Commissioner

I have been trying, rather less than successfully, to spray some shells, one with Tamiya TS-16 and another with X8 Yellow.  I have applied three light coats to each shell and allowed to dry between each coat...the result for each is very thin and patchy coating and it looks quite horrible.

Over they years I have found that all yellows I try result in the same effect...it has to be me, but what am I doing wrong? In the case of the TS-16, there is no thinning, straight from the can after a solid 5 minutes shaking it Smile

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  SAR523 Assistant Commissioner

Location: Chicago, IL
Doesn't explain the patchiness, but what did you prime it with, and what was the primer color?

I find yellows and reds work best over very light grey to even white primer.
  Gremlin Assistant Commissioner

Tamiya light grey primer, single coat
  ARodH Chief Train Controller

Location: East Oakleigh, Vic
I've not sprayed much yellow paint, but a tip I was given for many spray paints is to sit the can for a time in a container of warm/hot water before use. The only other things I can think of is too humid or too hot.
  Gremlin Assistant Commissioner

I may strip the whole thing back and try again....soak in Isopropyl alcohol overnight, or is there a better way?
  SA_trains Deputy Commissioner

Location: ACT
Hmmmm.... I'm wondering whether it is an air-brush/compressor issue?

What pressure are you spraying at? Is there any moisture in the air flow? can you adjust the spray pattern? perhaps try a smaller/narrow spray pattern. Maybe you need to use a lower pressure? Instead of spraying a model, get a sheet of styrene and try out a few of these variables see if that changes anything.

Back to paint... I note that you have shaken the paint. Have you actually tried stirring the paint? I have this mini power tool paint stirrer which mixes the paint far better than what shaking will do. Some yellows will get a solid particle layer that needs to get mixed in. What about trying a different brand of paint???

Everything else seems right. Grey primer is always what I recommend.

Hope this helps.
  Roachie Chief Commissioner

Location: Kadina SA (formerly NSW)
Hmmmm.... I'm wondering whether it is an air-brush/compressor issue?

What pressure are you spraying at? Is there any moisture in the air flow? can you adjust the spray pattern? perhaps try a smaller/narrow spray pattern. Maybe you need to use a lower pressure? Instead of spraying a model, get a sheet of styrene and tray out a few of these variables see if that changes anything.

Back to paint... I note that you have shaken the paint. Have you actually tried stirring the paint? I have this mini power tool paint stirrer which mixes the paint far better than what shaking will do. Some yellows will get a solid particle layer that needs to get mixed in. What about trying a different brand of paint???

Everything else seems right. Grey primer is always what I recommend.

Hope this helps.
SA_trains
Gremlin wrote in the original post: there is no thinning, straight from the can after a solid 5 minutes shaking it https://www.railpage.com.au/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

Am I correct in thinking that he/you are using an aerosol can....not an airbrush?

Back in the days when I was building/painting kits for a second income, I had a useful little gadget inside my paint booth. It comprised of a small electric (12v) motor from something like an old cassette player, with an extended shaft made from a piece of square brass tubing. That extension was about 60mm long and in the end of it I cut a thin gap and inserted a piece of scrap brass from a etch sheet (DJH models); soldered in place...about 3mm x 10mm.

I connected the wires for the motor to my good ol' H&M duette and place the jar of paint up so the "stirrer" was at the bottom of the jar. Hold the jar with one hand and operate the H&M with the other.....result was a proper-good mixed-up paint bottle.

Another idea I have employed over the years is to open a new tin of paint and drop-in a small nut or ball bearing, seal the tin up again and shake the bottle/can. The new foreign object does the job of mixing-in the solid stuff.

Personally, I wouldn't even consider using an aerosol can to spray a model. Just my choice though.

Roachie
  Aaron The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: University of Adelaide SA
TS paints are 'Tamiya Spray' ie aerosol.

The X are bottled paints.