Flagships?

 
  vinelander Junior Train Controller

Can someone please explain what a "Flagship" service is and what makes it that? Is there only one up and down per day on each country service? I don't think I've heard of this on interstate services but I'm certainly prepared to stand corrected.
I always choose to learn something every day!!

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  doyle Assistant Commissioner

I would imagine 'flagship' would be a service that arrives at its destination at the optimal time, whatever that maybe,
To me it seems quite silly, it's a service like any other. Unsure if this term is used elsewhere
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
Can someone please explain what a "Flagship" service is and what makes it that? Is there only one up and down per day on each country service? I don't think I've heard of this on interstate services but I'm certainly prepared to stand corrected.
I always choose to learn something every day!!
vinelander
Merriam-Webster Dictonary definition of "FLAGSHIP" is :-

  1. The ship that carries the commander of a fleet and flies the commander's flag
  2. The finest, largest, or most important one of a series, network, or chain (In this case a passenger train)
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Norda Fittazroy

Merriam-Webster Dictonary definition of "FLAGSHIP" is :-
  1. The ship that carries the commander of a fleet and flies the commander's flag
  2. The finest, largest, or most important one of a series, network, or chain (In this case a passenger train)
"Pressman"

V Line's definition is a train that manages to run most of the time when it's supposed to, and stays within spitting distance of keeping to the timetable.
  kuldalai Chief Commissioner

Can someone please explain what a "Flagship" service is and what makes it that? Is there only one up and down per day on each country service? I don't think I've heard of this on interstate services but I'm certainly prepared to stand corrected.
I always choose to learn something every day!!
vinelander
The term flagship service was dreamt up by some Victorian  Government wxxxxr  to describe the trains that met the near unachievable target travel times set by the Government of the day to the 4  RFR  corridors to Geelong, Ballarat, Bendigo and  Traralgon . That was in the early 2000's  .

Ony one service was scheduled Up in the am Peak and Down in the  PM Peak in each corridor .  They were supposed to be express but right from day one VLP started putting extra stops into and extending the schedules to appease every intermediate squeaking wheel  (weak VLP management ). The schedules were virtually un achievable and some of the timings were crazy like  0530 Up ex Bendigo, so in the best railway traditions they ran at times to suit V/Line not when they would get maximum loadings to the stations at the end of the line as expresses to / from Geelong, Ballarat, Bendigo and Traralgon .

As such they were a gimmick for the Government Spin Doctresses to play with , but pretty useless to the long suffering punters .  The worst flagship was the Traralgon with so many stops it may as well have stopped all stations . the time keeping was pretty pathetic .  To the larger degree the flagship services have dissapeared altogether or been dumbed down by VLP so much with extra stops that they are useless as express services . Politicians playing trains .  Sounded good 45  minute trip to Geelong but there were only two a day and then they couldn t keep time.  The steam hauled Geelong Flyer did it in 52 minutes in 1937  reliably every day .
  justapassenger Minister for Railways

The concept of advertising the fastest train on the route (and scheduling the fastest train for the advertisements) had existed in the rail world for well over a century before the RFR project. The only thing potentially unique to V/Line would be that they actually used the term 'flagship service' in publications for public consumption, instead of that term being a working title for internal use with the marketing for public consumption outsourced to proper PR professionals.

Advertising a 'best time' is still useful though, because rail in Australia needs every little bit of help it can get when it is so uncompetitive against road transport over inter-urban distances. But it's best to make actual improvements, so the 'best time' train can be good enough to use for advertising while still serving enough stations to be a practical option for real people.

Related tactics can be found elsewhere using service quality (e.g. enjoy chef-cooked meals with real crockery - but only on a couple of trains a day) and service price (e.g. fly to Sydney from $29 - so long as you are among the first five to book, fly at 4:30am on a Thursday and don't bring luggage) available