Brakes on older rollingstock

 
  Trainbuff317 Beginner

Hi,

I have noticed recently that a lot of the older trains (e.g V,K,S sets) have this burning smell from the brakes and sometimes some smoke.

Would anyone know what the brake shoes are made out of? I just had this thought that it could be asbestos and that has got me a little worried.

Thank you.

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  theanimal Chief Commissioner

With asbestos being resistant to burning, what  would make you think the smell is asbestos?
  theanimal Chief Commissioner
  s3_gunzel Not a gunzel developer

Location: Western Sydney, AU
or read this

http://www.dustdiseasestribunal.justice.nsw.gov.au/Documents/stateofnsw(reid).pdf
theanimal
this

Apologies, had an issue with it, so made it a link.
  Trainbuff317 Beginner

This has got me wondering, if there is asbestos on any other part of the trains that is posing a risk to the Passengers and/or Crew?
  nswtrains Chief Commissioner

This has got me wondering, if there is asbestos on any other part of the trains that is posing a risk to the Passengers and/or Crew?
Trainbuff317
No.
  gordon_s1942 Chief Commissioner

Location: Central Tablelands of NSW
Just recently a locomotive on static display at Eskbank House in Lithgow was found to have asbestos which was removed to allow it to be once again to be accessible to the Public.
I was on the understanding the Railways moved away from using Brake Shoes using asbestos possibly 20 years ago and the automotive industry did the same.

I see an advertisment in the local paper for home owners to check and have removed roof insulation installed pre 1980 that could contain asbestos and after seeing that made me think that this product was freely available and used anywhere heat insulation was required not only on Loco's and other rolling stock but in buildings as well around metal chimneys where stoves were used.
  Matthew Chief Train Controller

have removed roof insulation installed pre 1980 that could contain asbestos and after seeing that made me think that this product was freely available and used anywhere heat insulation was required not only on Loco's and other rolling stock but in buildings as well around metal chimneys where stoves were used.
gordon_s1942
Asbestos was once seen as a 'wonder material' and used every where insulation was required.

Apparently my mother in law even had an asbestos table mat - intended that hot oven ware could be put on the dining table with out damaging the table.

The problem with asbestos is the dust. If it's kept solid, painted and not subject to mechanical damage (which would make dust) , it's pretty safe. In many cases where it's found as part of buildings the best option is often to just leave it there with a warning 'don't drill into here'.

The problem with the former use of Asbestos in railway brake blocks is the dust this made. All the tunnels had to be cleaned of this dust.
  theanimal Chief Commissioner

have removed roof insulation installed pre 1980 that could contain asbestos and after seeing that made me think that this product was freely available and used anywhere heat insulation was required not only on Loco's and other rolling stock but in buildings as well around metal chimneys where stoves were used.
Asbestos was once seen as a 'wonder material' and used every where insulation was required.

Apparently my mother in law even had an asbestos table mat - intended that hot oven ware could be put on the dining table with out damaging the table.

The problem with asbestos is the dust. If it's kept solid, painted and not subject to mechanical damage (which would make dust) , it's pretty safe. In many cases where it's found as part of buildings the best option is often to just leave it there with a warning 'don't drill into here'.

The problem with the former use of Asbestos in railway brake blocks is the dust this made. All the tunnels had to be cleaned of this dust.
Matthew
Very reue, in 1979 when a young starry eyed animal started down the path to matrimonial bliss, my first house had asbestos backed curtains to block the heat from the house.
  theanimal Chief Commissioner

have removed roof insulation installed pre 1980 that could contain asbestos and after seeing that made me think that this product was freely available and used anywhere heat insulation was required not only on Loco's and other rolling stock but in buildings as well around metal chimneys where stoves were used.
Asbestos was once seen as a 'wonder material' and used every where insulation was required.

Apparently my mother in law even had an asbestos table mat - intended that hot oven ware could be put on the dining table with out damaging the table.

The problem with asbestos is the dust. If it's kept solid, painted and not subject to mechanical damage (which would make dust) , it's pretty safe. In many cases where it's found as part of buildings the best option is often to just leave it there with a warning 'don't drill into here'.

The problem with the former use of Asbestos in railway brake blocks is the dust this made. All the tunnels had to be cleaned of this dust.
Very reue, in 1979 when a young starry eyed animal started down the path to matrimonial bliss, my first house had asbestos backed curtains to block the heat from the house.
  Black1050 Chief Train Controller

Location: Out of the Metrop
Beyond any asbestos that maybe inside the walls or cabinets of the silver sets,

However, I'm fairly sure there's plenty of asbestos brake dust caked onto the walls of the underground tunnels in the City Circle...

Follow any semi trailer down a long steep hill, and you will smell almost the same smell as hot brake on a silver set train.

Relax and enjoy the aroma.
  gordon_s1942 Chief Commissioner

Location: Central Tablelands of NSW
Back in the 50's it was one thing noticeable to people from the Country visiting Sydney was the smell and 'taste' of metal in the mouth when traveling on the Sydney Underground.
It was less noticeable at Central Electric possibly because it was not closed in (no Airport/Eastern Suburbs underground back then).
All all the coping of the platform edges you could see the shiny reflections which people took to be the material from the Brake shoes used back then.
  wally-wowser1 Train Controller

Location: overlooking the Mt vic washaway on Soldiers Pinch
Lets   sort of  straighten a  few miss ideas out there

  1,  cast iron brake shoes were used on engines & carriages up to the late 80's


   2 ,  composite shoes were  in use from the mid 80s or even earlier

    3, composite shoes with asbestos  were phased out late 80's & the composition of the shoes was changed  

      4,  all trains had non asbestos brake shoes  & no cast iron shoes from the late 80's

         5 , The city underground was cleansed by staff on a special train equipped with high pressure water sprays & hoses  , working late at night over many months . they may have even had a large vacume  cleaner which removed  the top  layer first.

            6 ,   The shiny glitter  seen on platforms was   from  cast iron brake shoes being applied to  wheels when  slowing  down   to  stop .



  E & OE

wally

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