Repairing Tyco Collectors rollingstock in Melbourne

 
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
I have a friend who has some classic and collectable Tyco F9 locomotives.  One has a burned out motor.  Where would or should be take his locomotive for repair.  Outer East preferred.

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  dthead Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
As usual parts will be a issue, often one has to go and buy  other 2nd hand models that are the same as your treasured item, and then it may have the same issue.

If Steve at Branchline cannot fix it it would be difficult, even if you had some scrificial units to combine into a working unit.

David
  M636C Minister for Railways

I have a friend who has some classic and collectable Tyco F9 locomotives.  One has a burned out motor.  Where would or should be take his locomotive for repair.  Outer East preferred.
bevans
There are some valuable resources on the web:

http://tycotrain.tripod.com/tycotrains/
http://tycotrain.tripod.com/tycotrainsredboxeracollectorsresource/

should help you identify the particular model.

http://www.ebay.com.au/gds/Tyco-Trains-Things-to-consider-when-buying-repairing-/10000000017817335/g.html

gives good general advice.

If the F9s are really early Mantua (Red Box) era, they may be repairable and parts might be available.
Even if not, a Mantua frame could be fitted to a later F9 since the same body was used.

It might be possible to substitute a current Athearn or Bachmann drive which would be much easier to find.

M636C
  SA_trains Deputy Commissioner

Location: ACT
I have a friend who has some classic and collectable Tyco F9 locomotives.  One has a burned out motor.  Where would or should be take his locomotive for repair.  Outer East preferred.
snip.......

If the F9s are really early Mantua (Red Box) era, they may be repairable and parts might be available.
Even if not, a Mantua frame could be fitted to a later F9 since the same body was used.

It might be possible to substitute a current Athearn or Bachmann drive which would be much easier to find.

M636C
M636C
Bevans,

If your Tyco F9 is actually "Classic and collectible", then re-powering with an Athearn/Bachman/Atlas mechanism will devalue the model considerably from a "collectible" point of view.

However, from a model railway point of view, you will get superior operation with one of these mechanisms. If the aim is to preserve the model as a Tyco collectible, then you have to keep it "original", that is, tyco parts.

Good luck.

Dan
  TedFreeman Locomotive Driver

Location: Toowoomba, Queensland
Contact Graeme Hearn, he carries Tyco parts and does articles in Model Railways in Australia relating to Tyco and other oldies, email ironhorse2@bigpond.com

Ted (Teditor) Freeman
  M636C Minister for Railways

Bevans,

If your Tyco F9 is actually "Classic and collectible", then re-powering with an Athearn/Bachman/Atlas mechanism will devalue the model considerably from a "collectible" point of view.

However, from a model railway point of view, you will get superior operation with one of these mechanisms. If the aim is to preserve the model as a Tyco collectible, then you have to keep it "original", that is, tyco parts.

Good luck.

Dan
SA_trains
Dan,

I think you have misread my post.
I indicated the differences between the early Mantua era Tyco (Red Box) and later era (Brown Box) Tyco.
As I understand it Mantua era Tyco can be repaired and spares are available (or were until recently).
These parts could be used even on a Brown Box era model.

However Brown Box era parts were never available, but equally, Brown Box era models are not normally regarded as collectible.
Since inserting a Mantua/Red Box mechanism in a Brown Box model is a fairly complete change and since the model is not normally regarded as collectible, a different mechanism is unlikely to reduce its value.

Peter
  SA_trains Deputy Commissioner

Location: ACT
Bevans,

If your Tyco F9 is actually "Classic and collectible", then re-powering with an Athearn/Bachman/Atlas mechanism will devalue the model considerably from a "collectible" point of view.

However, from a model railway point of view, you will get superior operation with one of these mechanisms. If the aim is to preserve the model as a Tyco collectible, then you have to keep it "original", that is, tyco parts.

Good luck.

Dan
Dan,

I think you have misread my post.
I indicated the differences between the early Mantua era Tyco (Red Box) and later era (Brown Box) Tyco.
As I understand it Mantua era Tyco can be repaired and spares are available (or were until recently).
These parts could be used even on a Brown Box era model.

However Brown Box era parts were never available, but equally, Brown Box era models are not normally regarded as collectible.
Since inserting a Mantua/Red Box mechanism in a Brown Box model is a fairly complete change and since the model is not normally regarded as collectible, a different mechanism is unlikely to reduce its value.

Peter
M636C

Peter,

On the contrary, I believe that you have miss read mine!

Admittedly, I may not have entirely honed in on your Bachmann/Athearn comment, but my comment was really aimed at it.

If the Tyco loco is collectible then replacing the mechanism with an Athearn mechanism, as an example, would crucify the collectible value. Collectors, generally insist that an item be "original". That is point I am making. The collectible nature will only remain if Tyco bits are inserted. Your comment regarding Mantua/Red box was interpreted by me as suitable parts that would maintain the collectible status of the loco.

Now, I have zero idea if Tyco is collectible or otherwise. I have never heard of it being collectible, but I'm not an antique dealer either....

Cheers,

Dan
  dthead Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
@bevans, and feedback form these helpful posts?

Regards,
David Head
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
Tyco were the ready to run versions of Mantua which were kits you had to assemble. Both companies were owned by the Tyler family and existed side by side from the late 1950's. Consolidated foods eventually bought out the company but not the Mantua name so continued to make them as TYCO but they were drastically cheapened up though and made in Hong Kong then.  Out went expensive to make things like the original underframes etc and in came the cheap and somewhat nasty Chinese made mechs that everyone today associates with Tyco brand. The models bodies were not change that much though and any Mantua/tyco F7/9 should fit under each other bodies.

Both are collectable to a point, with Mantua the original one being the more collectable, Tyco later were just childs toys almost. After consolidated Foods got out of the model train industry the company and the dies etc were repurchased by the Tyler family company and reissued as Mantua for a number of years. But it was not the success it was originally so the Tyler family threw in the towel so to speak and the whole range Mantua name and all were finally bought by Model Power and later when Model Power went broke both Model Power and Mantua were bought by the Model Rectifier Company (MRC) and at the moment that is where the saga ends.

Nearly every owner in that lot has changed things though some for the better and one for the worse. But most are still products from way back when, with a few later models thrown into the pot.

It all depends on what era you want to collect with these models though as to how valuable they are as a collectors item. To most people the cheap Hong Kong made trains are just toys not models really. They had some rather garish and unbelievable colour schemes on them in the Consolidated Foods era.
  Heihachi_73 Chief Commissioner

Location: Terminating at Ringwood
Tyco's PowerTorque motors are generally rubbish, the older MU-2 drives are much more sought after, although practically anything is better than factory motors from 40 years ago. Even el-cheapo Life-Like pancake motors are a step up above PowerTorque motors, despite suffering from the exact same problems as Tyco - half the wheels being plastic and the resulting poor electrical pickup. At least with Lima models you can wire up the insulated metal wheels.

Is the dead motor actually burnt out or just seized?

If anyone wants the innards from a circa 1980 Sharknose (Rock Island), I have everything in a box after doing a chassis swap (note: the rear unpowered bogie has been modified to fit Lima passenger car wheelsets (e.g. Overland/IP/Ghan) in place of the half-plastic wheels, but I never got around to wiring up the insulated side).

Said Sharknose is now running a Linkline chassis (out of a damaged 4-axle GM knockoff), and is officially my slowest loco and probably the loudest too despite being plain old DC with no decoders/sound etc. - it actually runs slightly faster in reverse than forward!
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
@bevans, and feedback form these helpful posts?

Regards,
David Head
dthead

Hi David, thanks for the prompt.  The posts have been terrific and I have (and forgot to mention) sent the URL to my friend Tim who will no doubt take action.  I have also encouraged Tim to post his feedback on what transpires for all of us.

Thanks again guys for all the feedback.

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