Power generation issues in South Australia

 
  kipioneer Chief Commissioner

Location: Aberfoyle Park
There is plenty of gas fired base load power in South Australia but one, AGL's Torrens Island, is getting a bit long in the tooth and needs replacing.

Given the price of gas delivered from Moomba via a gas pipeline that isn't immediately feasible.

The other gas station at Pelican Point was touted by the then Liberal Government in 1999 or thereabouts when it was commissioned as being able to handle base load power in the state when required.   Its owners, ENGIE, have chosen not to run it at full capacity recently due to the gas price.

Neither was running during the state-wide blackout, and Pelican Point at only half capacity Wednesday but was ordered online yesterday (Thursday).   It is now back offline.

Having Northern running in September without the Adelaide based generators wouldn't have really helped Adelaide when 3 of the 4 transmission lines to Port Augusta were out.    A bit of power would have got through but there would have had to be considerable load shedding to cope.

One of the options available to the SA Government would be to either nationalise Pelican Point or to impose strict regulation on it.   Either will cost.

What happens when ENGIE close Hazelwood remains to be seen.

Sponsored advertisement

  kitchgp Chief Commissioner

This is a complex issue. SA's power is privatised so it's up to a private company to build a new power station.  I think it is unlikely you'll find a company  willing to invest huge amounts of capital in a power station that's only to supply power for air conditioners one week a year.

The 2016 power crisis in Tasmania was caused by low rainfall, Hydro Tasmania's management practices in the lead up and the failure of the Basslink interconnector power cable between the Latrobe Valley and Tasmania.  Interestingly I don't recall any national outrage over the situation, eg calls to duplicate Basslink, build a new base-load power station in Tasmania or tow an iceberg up from Antarctica.

Another issue is the surplus base load resulting from the downturn in manufacturing in Australia, eg no auto manufacturing and closure of Point Henry aluminium smelter. In the Point Henry case, the nearby Anglesea power station was closed but this only supplied 40% of Point Henry's needs, the rest came from Loy Yang A which is still running. Hazelwood isn't being closed down by the State government. It's being closed by its owners as they couldn't sell it and have deemed it uneconomic to run a 50+ year-old power station in a surplus market.

Also there have been suggestions of market manipulation, similar to Enron's practices in California in the early 2000s. Here's one example:
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-08-18/alleged-price-gouging-at-work-in-sa-elecricity-market/7763164

Sydney (at the moment) and Melbourne implement load shedding, and resultant rolling blackouts, during periods of extreme heat. In Melbourne arrangements have been made with large consumers to suspend supply or use their standby generators, with the mains as a backup, during these periods.  I don't know if Sydney has similar arrangements.

Snowy Hydro's website states:
"Three of the six generating units at Tumut 3 Power Station also have large pumps that can be used to pump water from Jounama Pondage back up into Talbingo Reservoir, thereby ‘recycling’ water. Water cannot be pumped any further uphill than Talbingo Reservoir."
This is done at off-peak power rates.

'Gold-plating' of the network is a national problem. The industry has largely been privatised (fortunately not Snowy Hydro or Hydro Tasmania yet) so it is hard to see exactly what governments can do about it. Although the privatisation has been carried out by State governments, it was certainly encouraged by the Federal government.
  SA_trains Deputy Commissioner

Location: ACT
Blackouts forecast for NSW tomorrow and they have plenty of coal fired power.

Maybe that's not the real issue.
Official message just received:

I have just received notification that ACTEWAGL have been advised by the national power regulator of power supply issues potentially affecting the eastern states of Australia.



ACTEWAGL has been instructed to shed 52MW of power in Canberra between the hours of 2 and 6pm today with a further forecast for tomorrow still to be advised.


There is, as Bing said, no shortage of generation.
So are they shedding load to avoid paying for additional intermediate or peak load power?
Shedding load doesn't cost you anything but running up a dozen big gas turbines  for four hours (above) probably does cost quite a lot.

You make more money by cutting supply.

In my case...

In the event that mains power is lost, site power generators will operate in order to maintain business operations.

Since we don't have opening windows, I hope that includes air conditioning and not just the network..

Will lumps of coal still be handed around in the House of Representatives if those lights go out?

Peter
M636C

Yep, I'm in the ACT too and we got sent home at 3PM....
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
Something happened in NSW, power priced at $14,000MWh
http://aemo.com.au/
  62430 Assistant Commissioner

Location: Metro Adelaide
This is a complex issue. SA's power is privatised so it's up to a private company to build a new power station.  I think it is unlikely you'll find a company  willing to invest huge amounts of capital in a power station that's only to supply power for air conditioners one week a year.

...

'Gold-plating' of the network is a national problem. The industry has largely been privatised (fortunately not Snowy Hydro or Hydro Tasmania yet) so it is hard to see exactly what governments can do about it. Although the privatisation has been carried out by State governments, it was certainly encouraged by the Federal government.
Ah, was it the weight of gold on the SA transmission towers, lines and Stobie poles that caused them to collapse and cause the series of outages in SA since September?

Robustness, redundancy ... or 'gold-plating'?  The radial transmission system on the Eyre Peninsula in SA is known for its supply problems.  Planning investment in electricity system is complex. Too little and you get outages and complaints; too much and you get complaints. ;=)

Alex C
  trainbrain Chief Commissioner

There is enough coal in the Latrobe Valley to last the next 17000 years, what has been touched represents less than 2 per cent that has been used. The old SEC Victoria has set aside plans to burn coal more effieciently than the bloody Greens would let you believe. New Power stations have already been planned at Loy Yang B and C, but all Governments are afraid to implement these plans. Stuff the Greenies, Victoria will face permanent lrolling blackouts once Hazelwood closes.
  dthead Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Topic split from: Leigh Creek Coal Train - The End Is Nigh
[color=#0066cc][size=2][font=Roboto, wf_SegoeUI, "Segoe UI", Segoe, "Segoe WP", Tahoma, Verdana, Arial, sans-serif]https://www.railpage.com.au/f-t11381779-0-asc-s325.htm[/font][/size][/color]

as it is about power, mainly SA based.

David Head, Moderator
===============================================
  Carnot Minister for Railways

Something happened in NSW, power priced at $14,000MWh
http://aemo.com.au/
RTT_Rules
Greedy power generating companies manipulating the market price to maximize profits?

http://reneweconomy.com.au/greedy-energy-industry-too-clever-by-half-kicks-an-own-goal-91210/
  Nightfire Minister for Railways

Location: Gippsland
There Is a rumour going round that Palican Point power station has sold half It's has allocation to the export market through Gladstone QLD.
As they got an export offer price that they couldn't refuse.
  Nightfire Minister for Railways

Location: Gippsland
Natural Gas allocation
(Couldn't edit on the phone)
  prwise Locomotive Driver

This thread will just not die .... will it?

Is the Leigh Creek coal field the SA Premier's silver bullet?

What more will it take to reopen the Northern Power station?

How long would it take to build a new one?

No more dirty political tricks, but lots more dirty coal on its way to PA.
Blackouts forecast for NSW tomorrow and they have plenty of coal fired power.

Maybe that's not the real issue.
bingley hall
Actually NSW dodged the bullet because they have good cheap base load that has allowed them to have interruptible base load energy

Tomago took one for the team yesterday by shutting down one of three potlines in rotation freeing up 300MW which is not insignificant

All states except SA are able to do this. Maybe SA Gov't should have tried to attract some base load industry to support Northern instead of being in the cheer squad to see it close.
  steam4ian Chief Commissioner

Carnot, thank you for drawing attention to Reneweconomy, perhaps its time you got on your (Carnot) cycle and peddled off into the sunset.

Reneweconomy and their ilk are a significant part of the problem because they will not recognise that there is one.

The problem is typified by the following:
1/ Bar graphs that show generation by state which include small household type solar generation. The figure provided is a furphy because it is questimated and does not represent power that has to pass through the grid.
2/ The bar graphs for SA often show significant wind farm contribution but do not show how much "dirty" electricity is being imported from the eastern states via the interconnectors.
3/ On Thursday this week the SA demand almost topped 3GW yet the over 1.4GW of installed wind generation could only supply 189MW. Every thing that could burn fossil fuel was operating.

This last point demonstrates the fallacy of considering wind energy as anything more than an incidental part of the mix.

At best a wind farm can only generate about 35% of its installed capacity and on the 8th and 9th of this month it was demonstrated that the actually outputs were much less than that percentage.

Renewenergy are calling for generators to be forced to provide energy into the system. It that is to be applied to thermal generators it must also be applied to renewable generators.

Wind generators need to have their present connection agreements terminated and only renewed when they can demonstrate reliable arrangements to be able to provide say 35% of their connected capacity on demand.

As for SA the government should take over Northern Power Station and recommission it and also the railway to Leigh Creek. They would then buy all government energy from NPS by wheeling it through the network. NPS energy would be about the lowest price energy in the state. To do so would require a large meal of humble pie on their part but it would solve a number of problems.
  Carnot Minister for Railways

Carnot, thank you for drawing attention to Reneweconomy, perhaps its time you got on your (Carnot) cycle and peddled off into the sunset.

Reneweconomy and their ilk are a significant part of the problem because they will not recognise that there is one.

The problem is typified by the following:
1/ Bar graphs that show generation by state which include small household type solar generation. The figure provided is a furphy because it is questimated and does not represent power that has to pass through the grid.
2/ The bar graphs for SA often show significant wind farm contribution but do not show how much "dirty" electricity is being imported from the eastern states via the interconnectors.
3/ On Thursday this week the SA demand almost topped 3GW yet the over 1.4GW of installed wind generation could only supply 189MW. Every thing that could burn fossil fuel was operating.

This last point demonstrates the fallacy of considering wind energy as anything more than an incidental part of the mix.

At best a wind farm can only generate about 35% of its installed capacity and on the 8th and 9th of this month it was demonstrated that the actually outputs were much less than that percentage.

Renewenergy are calling for generators to be forced to provide energy into the system. It that is to be applied to thermal generators it must also be applied to renewable generators.

Wind generators need to have their present connection agreements terminated and only renewed when they can demonstrate reliable arrangements to be able to provide say 35% of their connected capacity on demand.

As for SA the government should take over Northern Power Station and recommission it and also the railway to Leigh Creek. They would then buy all government energy from NPS by wheeling it through the network. NPS energy would be about the lowest price energy in the state. To do so would require a large meal of humble pie on their part but it would solve a number of problems.
steam4ian
I actually agree that too much reliance on 'unreliable' green energy is part of the problem.  In an ideal world we would be able to tap into a reliable base load power source like Geothermal (which has proven to be a troublesome technology).

Should NPS be recommissioned?  Given the imminent closure of Hazelwood in Vic, I tend to think they might have to before next summer.  Good luck with that.
  bingley hall Minister for Railways

Location: Last train to Skaville
There is enough coal in the Latrobe Valley to last the next 17000 years, what has been touched represents less than 2 per cent that has been used. The old SEC Victoria has set aside plans to burn coal more effieciently than the bloody Greens would let you believe. New Power stations have already been planned at Loy Yang B and C, but all Governments are afraid to implement these plans. Stuff the Greenies, Victoria will face permanent lrolling blackouts once Hazelwood closes.
trainbrain
And stuff you too you knuckle dragging redneck Razz
  kitchgp Chief Commissioner

Ah, was it the weight of gold on the SA transmission towers, lines and Stobie poles that caused them to collapse and cause the series of outages in SA since September?

Robustness, redundancy ... or 'gold-plating'?  The radial transmission system on the Eyre Peninsula in SA is known for its supply problems.  Planning investment in electricity system is complex. Too little and you get outages and complaints; too much and you get complaints. ;=)

Alex C
"62430"



I thought we were talking about generation, not distribution.
  neillfarmer Chief Train Controller

The idea that renewable generators have to be able to guarantee supply of some fixed percentage of installed capacity is one of the more sensible things to come out of this debacle. When the sun is out or the wind is blowing the guarantee plant can be shut down and everybody can feel good. On a hot still night they can fire up their gas turbine, which can be situated anywhere on the national grid, and everybody can feel cool. The cost of the guarantee power plant can be recouped from the very high tariff its power will attract.
There will be mismatches between costs and revenues of such a scheme. These should become an issue for Governments, both State and Commonwealth.
State Governments need to be involved because it is wrong that consumers in one state pay higher energy tariffs because of ideological decisions taken by another state.
I used the word debacle above, not because power was shut off for 45 minutes or so, but because of the mass of misinformation and half truths being peddled as facts by every political hack in the country.
The present system is broken because we have a national grid that is composed of states that have widely varying agendas, some who are taking decisions based on the assumption that some other state will bail them out if they get it wrong. Each state should be responsible for generating its own power, the interconnectors used to stabilise the system and to cover breakdowns. If a state needs to use the interconnector for base loads then they should negotiate a suitable supply arrangement with some other generator who has excess capacity.
If such an arrangement existed then blackouts in a state would be the responsibility of the Government of that state.
  62430 Assistant Commissioner

Location: Metro Adelaide
Ah, was it the weight of gold on the SA transmission towers, lines and Stobie poles that caused them to collapse and cause the series of outages in SA since September?

Robustness, redundancy ... or 'gold-plating'?  The radial transmission system on the Eyre Peninsula in SA is known for its supply problems.  Planning investment in electricity system is complex. Too little and you get outages and complaints; too much and you get complaints. ;=)

Alex C



I thought we were talking about generation, not distribution.
kitchgp
...

'Gold-plating' of the network is a national problem.


...
kitchgp
I was under the impression that the term 'gold-plating' was normally used in the context of transmission and distribution.  The general discussion regarding the power supply in the present heatwave has shown that in SA, NSW and QLD there isn't a great excess of generating capacity.

I was writing in the SA context of recent months where there has been considerable concern expressed about the reliability of supply in the wake of the outages that have occurred.  A number of factors have been involved in these outages, generation capacity, generation mix, transmission and distribution.   But a major consideration going into the future is balancing system robustness against the costs of investment and operation. Ideally this should done in the light of a dispassionate analysis of the supply industry nationally.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
This thread will just not die .... will it?

Is the Leigh Creek coal field the SA Premier's silver bullet?

What more will it take to reopen the Northern Power station?

How long would it take to build a new one?

No more dirty political tricks, but lots more dirty coal on its way to PA.
Blackouts forecast for NSW tomorrow and they have plenty of coal fired power.

Maybe that's not the real issue.
Actually NSW dodged the bullet because they have good cheap base load that has allowed them to have interruptible base load energy

Tomago took one for the team yesterday by shutting down one of three potlines in rotation freeing up 300MW which is not insignificant

All states except SA are able to do this. Maybe SA Gov't should have tried to attract some base load industry to support Northern instead of being in the cheer squad to see it close.
prwise
This is where the aluminium industry in Australia I think is lagging. In other countries they have become the virtual battery, able to dump large amounts of power onto the grid and earn significant revenues way above their metal profits and then ramp up slightly when the prices are so cheap the profits from making more metal are much higher.

Each potline at Tomago is +300MW, Boyne is slightly less for Lines 1 and 2 and nearly 400MW for Line 3. Plenty of scope to take rolling hits, although BSL is limited by grid capacity to Brisbane and southern states. Portland is smaller but most was off line at moment anyway and Bell Bay is in Tassie and limited by Bass Link.
  kitchgp Chief Commissioner

I was under the impression that the term 'gold-plating' was normally used in the context of transmission and distribution.  The general discussion regarding the power supply in the present heatwave has shown that in SA, NSW and QLD there isn't a great excess of generating capacity.

I was writing in the SA context of recent months where there has been considerable concern expressed about the reliability of supply in the wake of the outages that have occurred.  A number of factors have been involved in these outages, generation capacity, generation mix, transmission and distribution.   But a major consideration going into the future is balancing system robustness against the costs of investment and operation. Ideally this should done in the light of a dispassionate analysis of the supply industry nationally.
"62430"


gold-plating - to incorporate costly features or refinements into (something) unnecessarily,
eg the engineers were accused of gold-plating the construction project.
  SAR523 Assistant Commissioner

Location: Chicago, IL
Allow me to explain at length. I, too, believed in the absolute undeniable truth of climate science once upon a time.

Ten years or so ago at the height of the very long and somewhat unprecedented drought we were having in southern Australia I read Tim Flannery's book (among others) and I was as convinced as anyone else that anthropomorphic climate change was a real and tangible thing AND that the drought was absolutely irrefutable evidence of this happening. Flannery (at that time) was also going around telling people that the drought was the new normal and in response most state Premiers decided that the construction of desalination plants was the way to go - because after all, as Tim Flannery assured us - the dams would never, ever be full again.

Fast forward ten years and I don't think there's any denying that the construction of these desal plants was an over-reaction and boondoggle ($30-$40 billion down the drain in Victoria's case) to what now appears to be a cyclical phenomenon. Yet people who are the Aussie experts on climate change are still telling us that - yes - they were still right all along and that the unusually wet winter that we've just had combined with the odd storm is also part of the global warming phenomenon… we should expect the sky to continue to fall because of increasing carbon dioxide but perhaps not in the same manner that they were telling us it would ten years ago.

don_dunstan

It would be a terrible shame for you to have changed you mind based on what appears to be a blatant lie. I am unable to find any evidence of Flannery claiming that the dams would never, ever be full again or words similar.

What I am able to find is plenty of evidence of people deliberately distorting what was would seem to be the inarguable conclusion that the well documented drop in run-off going into dams was due to the well documented drop in rainfall coupled with a higher water retention of drought parched flora and soil.

In his very next sentence (at least from the paragraph that is normally quoted to support Bolt's claim)

"If that trend continues then I think we're going to have serious problems..."

...Flannery is very clear that there is uncertainty as to whether this situation will continue but he is highlighting the risk if it does.  This is in no way making the claim that the dams will never, ever fill again.

It would be quite extraordinary for Flannery to prognosticate that definitively, as he quite often talks about (and hence presumably understands) the likelihood of increased rainfall due to El Nino as well as the likelihood of receiving more intense (but likely with lower average) rainfalls due to the greater levels of moisture in the atmosphere.  

Its important to separate what the IPCC and people like Flannery are actually saying, as opposed to what their detractors claim they are saying.  The shortcomings of the models are well described and discussed, as are observations that don't fit the predictions, such as the continued growth of ice in Antarctica (unfortunately until this year, where it looks like the warming has caught up at last).  


The desal plants are a more complex story.  Again I am unable to find quotes of him claiming that they are essential, as frequently claimed by his detractors (although I'm more than happy to be corrected).  Again I can find cases of him recommending them as insurance, which seems a reasonable point of view.  Building them as soon as what is likely to be an every 10-15 year drought ends doesn't seem to make a lot of sense as that's about their expected lifetime, but that becomes an engineering and risk management question, rather than a straight issue of interpreting observations.


On the other hand, running out of power for hours or days is inconvenient to most people.  Running out of potable water is a completely different story.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Allow me to explain at length. I, too, believed in the absolute undeniable truth of climate science once upon a time.

Ten years or so ago at the height of the very long and somewhat unprecedented drought we were having in southern Australia I read Tim Flannery's book (among others) and I was as convinced as anyone else that anthropomorphic climate change was a real and tangible thing AND that the drought was absolutely irrefutable evidence of this happening. Flannery (at that time) was also going around telling people that the drought was the new normal and in response most state Premiers decided that the construction of desalination plants was the way to go - because after all, as Tim Flannery assured us - the dams would never, ever be full again.

Fast forward ten years and I don't think there's any denying that the construction of these desal plants was an over-reaction and boondoggle ($30-$40 billion down the drain in Victoria's case) to what now appears to be a cyclical phenomenon. Yet people who are the Aussie experts on climate change are still telling us that - yes - they were still right all along and that the unusually wet winter that we've just had combined with the odd storm is also part of the global warming phenomenon… we should expect the sky to continue to fall because of increasing carbon dioxide but perhaps not in the same manner that they were telling us it would ten years ago.

It would be a terrible shame for you to have changed you mind based on what appears to be a blatant lie. I am unable to find any evidence of Flannery claiming that the dams would never, ever be full again or words similar.

What I am able to find is plenty of evidence of people deliberately distorting what was would seem to be the inarguable conclusion that the well documented drop in run-off going into dams was due to the well documented drop in rainfall coupled with a higher water retention of drought parched flora and soil.

In his very next sentence (at least from the paragraph that is normally quoted to support Bolt's claim)

"If that trend continues then I think we're going to have serious problems..."

...Flannery is very clear that there is uncertainty as to whether this situation will continue but he is highlighting the risk if it does.  This is in no way making the claim that the dams will never, ever fill again.

It would be quite extraordinary for Flannery to prognosticate that definitively, as he quite often talks about (and hence presumably understands) the likelihood of increased rainfall due to El Nino as well as the likelihood of receiving more intense (but likely with lower average) rainfalls due to the greater levels of moisture in the atmosphere.  

Its important to separate what the IPCC and people like Flannery are actually saying, as opposed to what their detractors claim they are saying.  The shortcomings of the models are well described and discussed, as are observations that don't fit the predictions, such as the continued growth of ice in Antarctica (unfortunately until this year, where it looks like the warming has caught up at last).  


The desal plants are a more complex story.  Again I am unable to find quotes of him claiming that they are essential, as frequently claimed by his detractors (although I'm more than happy to be corrected).  Again I can find cases of him recommending them as insurance, which seems a reasonable point of view.  Building them as soon as what is likely to be an every 10-15 year drought ends doesn't seem to make a lot of sense as that's about their expected lifetime, but that becomes an engineering and risk management question, rather than a straight issue of interpreting observations.


On the other hand, running out of power for hours or days is inconvenient to most people.  Running out of potable water is a completely different story.
SAR523
IPCC = Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
  don_dunstan The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Adelaide proud
It would be a terrible shame for you to have changed you mind based on what appears to be a blatant lie. I am unable to find any evidence of Flannery claiming that the dams would never, ever be full again or words similar.

What I am able to find is plenty of evidence of people deliberately distorting what was would seem to be the inarguable conclusion that the well documented drop in run-off going into dams was due to the well documented drop in rainfall coupled with a higher water retention of drought parched flora and soil.
SAR523
He did in fact say on Lateline (amongst other places while promoting his book in 2007) that even if the rain fell again it would not fill the dams - on this point he was absolutely, incontrovertibly wrong. You can argue with semantics all you want here - he told us in 2007 that there would never be sufficient rainfall to fill dams again, end of story.

Flannery is just a 21st century version of PT Barnum with a scientific veneer. I wouldn't be so annoyed had he not been appointed the head of his own statutory authority on the basis of what he was supposedly an expert in. If I had known it was that easy I would have written my own alarmist book to get my own government authority on [flying spaghetti monsters, unicorns, whatever] because they were going to destroy us.
  kitchgp Chief Commissioner

Has there been any explanation or excuse for NSW's inability to meet power supply demands over the past few days? Was it wind farms? With a bit of luck we may be able to trace the blame back to the 2011 NSW Labor government. (Every time these power issues come up I'm reminded of Mark Taylor and his Fujitsu ads.)

PS: The desal plant in Melbourne was a far more complex issue than Tim Flannery's say so. (Victoria has to pay a minimum of $19bn over the 27-year contract, not the $30 -  $40bn quoted above.) There hasn't been a new dam opened in Melbourne since the Thompson in 1983. Where would you build a new one and get the catchment area for it. If such a dam had been built, it too would be lying idle at the moment.  At the time, 10 years ago, Melbourne's supply level was approaching the minimum, being in severe drought. The next trough in the cycle will be lower because of the increase in population since. In the 2009 bushfires Melbourne's existing catchments came close to being contaminated.
  62430 Assistant Commissioner

Location: Metro Adelaide
Has there been any explanation or excuse for NSW's inability to meet power supply demands over the past few days? Was it wind farms? With a bit of luck we may be able to trace the blame back to the 2011 NSW Labor government. (Every time these power issues come up I'm reminded of Mark Taylor and his Fujitsu ads.)

...
kitchgp
AEMO has issued a number of market notices (https://www.aemo.com.au/Market-Notices?currentFilter=&sortOrder=Date&searchString=LOR) over the last few days advising Lack of Reserve in NSW (also QLD and SA). The Level 2 and 3 forecast notices contain the sentences "AEMO is seeking a market response. AEMO will determine the latest time at which it would need to intervene through an AEMO intervention event."  Taken at face value, these would seem to indicate registered generation capacity within the market is not being offered for dispatch.
  kitchgp Chief Commissioner

AEMO has issued a number of market notices ............

"62430"


Thanks. That raises many questions. Too many to ask here.

Sponsored advertisement

Display from:   

Quick Reply

We've disabled Quick Reply for this thread as it was last updated more than six months ago.