Solar powered trams in Melbourne (and I'm not kidding!)

 
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
In that case we still have steam trains cuz we have coal fired power stations!
apw5910
Brilliant - I wonder if the spin doctor who thought of the solar powered trams would agree?

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  Boss Chief Commissioner

Location: Caulfield Line
Can someone correct me if I am wrong, please.

Solar panels generate DC. Inverters on site convert that to AC to feed into the power grid.

Power grids over distance loose a certain percentage of their power due to the resistance of the grid conductors, i.e., transmission loss.

Once the power arrives in Melbourne rectifiers will need to be used to convert the AC back to DC for use by the trams.

If the above is correct, can someone please tell me what % power would be lost due to the above processes assuming a transmission distance of say 200 kms?
  Draffa Chief Commissioner

If the above is correct, can someone please tell me what % power would be lost due to the above processes assuming a transmission distance of say 200 kms?
Boss
I don't know what voltage the trams run on, but for the rest of the trip, the vast majority of the line losses will be in the low voltage (240V/415V) section of the grid (assuming equal length line segments).  For a given amount of power, increasing the voltage has a multiplier effect of reducing losses (increase voltage by 10 times, you reduce losses by about 100 times)
In the high voltage section of the Grid, AC has higher losses than DC, but not by much (you can send HVDC 1000km and lose about 1%-3%, and most of the losses in the HV section are in the equipment at each end of the line segment).  Ambient temperature also plays a role.
We know the line losses aren't too bad because it's the system we use now.  AMEO publishes Distribution Loss Factors each year, and for each grid segment, they hover at just over 1% (LV grid segments are shorter than MV segments etc).

But the answer is 'it depends'.
  Boss Chief Commissioner

Location: Caulfield Line
If the above is correct, can someone please tell me what % power would be lost due to the above processes assuming a transmission distance of say 200 kms?
I don't know what voltage the trams run on, but for the rest of the trip, the vast majority of the line losses will be in the low voltage (240V/415V) section of the grid (assuming equal length line segments).  For a given amount of power, increasing the voltage has a multiplier effect of reducing losses (increase voltage by 10 times, you reduce losses by about 100 times)
In the high voltage section of the Grid, AC has higher losses than DC, but not by much (you can send HVDC 1000km and lose about 1%-3%, and most of the losses in the HV section are in the equipment at each end of the line segment).  Ambient temperature also plays a role.
We know the line losses aren't too bad because it's the system we use now.  AMEO publishes Distribution Loss Factors each year, and for each grid segment, they hover at just over 1% (LV grid segments are shorter than MV segments etc).

But the answer is 'it depends'.
Draffa
Thanks Draffa

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