Concrete points/ turnouts

 
  Markfresh Junior Train Controller

Hi ,
I am looking to extend my layout before I start wiring etc ,
And was thinking of using concrete flexitrack ,
I have wooden type at the moment but was going to make the extension look like a more recent in age area.
My problem is that peco make code 100 track in concrete but not points.
They only make the points in different codes .
So would I paint a wooden point to Match,
?
Or leave the points wood as that is prototypical in some places?
Thanks mark

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  Markfresh Junior Train Controller

Or I see that code 75 can be connected to code 100 with special peco joiners or soldered,
So I could just use code 75 concrete track and points?
Also as stated I have code 100 in a old style outback looking part of the layout, and am now looking to create a newer (year wise) town part layout ,
Like if you were taking a train from a town out West into a city the track sometimes would change , although I gather the sleepers would change but not the code size , but hey its a model .
I've heard of people using 100 for branch and 75 for main etc .
And suggestions most appreciated
Thanks
Mark
  Markfresh Junior Train Controller

Also what about code 83?
  dthead Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Mark, the code track gets smaller as the code decreases, ir code 75 track is smaller in all respects to code 100.

This affects the  trains you can one in terms of the flanges the train may have. for instance lima and older Hornby wheels have trouble with anything smaller than code 100.  What happens they run on the plactic spikes that hold the track. Whick also means a loco would not pick up power.

So one has to be careful. BUT if you use modernaustralian locos and rollingstock you should be OK. If you use ost american, you should be ok. But this is a general rule !

So you could use a code 75 point matched to code 100, as long as the rail level is identical. But if your train do not go through, check the wheel standards.


Regards,
David Head
  Markfresh Junior Train Controller

Thanks David ,
Would you suggest soldering the joints or using the peco 100-75 track adaptors ?
And in regards to the trains , I have an aucision 45 class waiting for when the layout gets working and will continue to get suitable trains.
But in case I am given one that won't run on 75 I've read it's possible to change the wheels/trucks to suit ?
Thanks mark
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
Changing wheels on freight stock or passenger stock is dead easy any 10 year old child can do it in most cases, however to change Lima or Hornby wheels on locomotives is a different kettle of fish. It can be done if you can find the right replacement scale wheels to fit the models but in this day and age replacement wheels have rapidly been made a bit redundant with finer scale models from all manufactures so actually finding decent replacement wheels is a big chore.

You need specialist tools as well that you may not have at hand now like a wheel puller which is similar to a gear puller used to remove pushed on gears on a axle. So replacing wheels on a locomotive is a hell of a lot harder especially if it is a steam locomotive. You could of course get the Lima metal wheels at least turned down, that is machine off part of the flange but it is fiddly work and could ruin the wheelset completely as well if you are not careful due to plastic wheel centres or insulating bushes.

Steam Era Models make wheels to replace Lima pizza cutter wheels and that alone make things like IP/Ghan cars look much better, SEM also sell a range of wheels that can be used to replace existing wheels in bogie or 4 wheeled cars, but they do not make replacement wheels for locomotives though. For passenger cars you need about a 10.5 mm wheel diameter X what ever the length of the axle is that you are replacing in HO. The old wheels in most cases can easily be removed by gently pushing the bogie sideframes sideways a short distance carefully till the end of the axle pops out of the frame, do the same to the other side if need be and simply put one end of the new wheelset into the hole or bearing on one side and gently push the other side into place and you have done it.

Oh and SEM wheels are sold already on a axle which is why you need both dimensions, you might not get exactly the right length say for instance it is a 12.5 mm axle in the model originally but SEM only make a 12mm axle length, it should still clip in and work for you though just a bit more free running than the old wheelset was though!
  NSW3802 Locomotive Fireman

Or I see that code 75 can be connected to code 100 with special peco joiners or soldered,
So I could just use code 75 concrete track and points?
Also as stated I have code 100 in a old style outback looking part of the layout, and am now looking to create a newer (year wise) town part layout ,
Like if you were taking a train from a town out West into a city the track sometimes would change , although I gather the sleepers would change but not the code size , but hey its a model .
I've heard of people using 100 for branch and 75 for main etc .
And suggestions most appreciated
Thanks
Mark
Markfresh
Mark,

When I have wanted to connect code 75 rail to code 100 I solder a fishplate to the code 100 rail, and then crimp the section flat where the code 75 is to join. I then sit the code 75 rail on the flat fishplate and solder it on. Comes out very well.

Les.
  Markfresh Junior Train Controller

Great info thanks.

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