It's the economy, stupid!

 
  Groundrelay Chief Commissioner

Location: Surrounded by Trolls!
Don Dunstan, here’s some possibilities to turn it all around.

- Government becomes an investor of last resort for businesses that look like closing which provide strategic value or significant employment?

- A Government organisation to identify and partner with businesses willing to establish or grow operations in Australia?

- All imports must be locally inspected and certified with regular random checks?

- Backpackers jobs phased out replace with local Aussie Workers Corps to address youth unemployment?

- GST on imports tripled?

- Remove GST on locally manufactured products?

- Off shore shopping sites blocked?

- Government to assist companies that lose export markets or use more costly imports that cannot be sourced locally?

- Government incentives for regional relocation of companies?

- All workers to be guaranteed a living wage?

- Training for strategic jobs to be free?

- Jack up the east coast so that water flows inland instead of out to sea?

- Banning use of Pommie celebrities on local TV programs?

Paying for it!

- Winding back all tax concessions unless associated with actual productive assets?

- A Sovereign Fund to underwrite business investments /partnerships/ assistance, to hold 10% of all Super?

- Single National Resource Rent Tax?

- Eliminate welfare where recipients are assessed as employable?

- Drastic action to break welfare cycle?

- Tax offshore companies based on local revenue?

Finally, establish a Nation Building Authority but no Rhonda, Jim or Karsten! Idea

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  don_dunstan The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Adelaide proud
Groundrelay - I'm not averse to some of those ideas but I think that the issues are much more subtle than that.

I tend to look at the historical and social perspective which says that the working class (and the poorer half generally) are in a very weak position in this country compared to where they have been in the past, probably worse than they were before the advent of wide-spread unionism in the 1890's. If you go back to the eighties is was very rare to find someone being paid for substantially less than award, conditions were well policed by unions that covered a range of industries, education was affordable (usually free) and if you were smart enough you could probably lift yourself into the professional classes. This combined with affordable housing meant that we had living standards for the poorest half that were the envy of the world.

Fast forward to 2017 and the competition for unskilled or semi-skilled jobs is ferocious from 457/student visa immigrants, over a million "temporary" visa holders, many of them working under the counter for $10 an hour or less. If you are living in a high-unemployment area in a capital city then your chances of being able to break into the labour market are stymied by those who are prepared to work for an effective rate that is less than the equivalent Centrelink benefit; that's the basic problem keeping youth unemployment at its highest levels for decades.

An education system that is broken with less than 65% of university graduates in any kind of work 12 months after graduating - this is the lowest that figure has ever been. Thanks to Gillard and Rudd the education system has become a giant warehouse for the future unemployed with at least half the people in post-secondary education right now destined to be under- or unemployed. Added to this a record high household debt in the stratosphere with Australia's households the most indebted in the world - so people need to borrow money just to continue to live thanks to stupidly high rents/mortgages.

The issue for me is that those people who have been quietly managed into poverty in the last 30 years have also had their representation at a political level taken away from them by the very people who claim to represent their point of view (ie the Labor Party). The Greens don't seem to understand that the drive to a Big Australia is really hurting the bottom half in Sydney and Melbourne. There's no chance those people will gain power or representation in Canberra with people like that supposedly representing their interests - especially the so-called "Labor" party.

Just an opinion.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
A few point on that DOn,
In the past Australia was a unskilled and skilled labour (trade) based economy topped up with some professional, it no longer is. The manufacturing and low skill jobs have been exported and would be difficult in many cases to bring most back without causing other problems. Some protectionism is ok, too much is not. In return for this exporting, we enjoy a higher standard of living compared to the past as costs decline for things like TV's, cars etc etc.

The growth in the Australian economy has been centred around SME's over last 5 years.

With regard to

- Government becomes an investor of last resort for businesses that look like closing which provide strategic value or significant employment?
This already happens. QIC and other state based investment arms of the govts do at times invest in companies that are in trouble. Of course the argument always is if the private sector won't invest why should teh govt, look at Aldandi coal?

- A Government organisation to identify and partner with businesses willing to establish or grow operations in Australia?
This exists now

- All imports must be locally inspected and certified with regular random checks?
This exists now, its called Quarantine and customs

- Backpackers jobs phased out replace with local Aussie Workers Corps to address youth unemployment?
This will cause more harm that it will help. Locals don't want a job for a few weeks every year. Backbackers also spend the bulk of their income in Australia and move with peak work demands.

- GST on imports tripled?
Protectionism has its place but this will ultimately cause us more harm than it will solve. There is a reason things are not made here and trippling or 10x the GST will not remove most of these. Vietnam, China etc have huge taxes on imported high end cars, 100% comes to mind the BMW's etc still come, just the govt pockets the cash. Meanwhile the working class drive around in crap locally made cars which are protected from imports.

I would prefer we operate more on a like for like basis. You tax my products at 100% I'll do yours at 100%. You dump, I'll tax it back up to market price.

- Remove GST on locally manufactured products?
The taxes would then need to be replaced with others to make up the short fall and it gets messy if the product is made off shore with Australian materials, partly made here, made here with imported materials etc.

- Off shore shopping sites blocked?
Censorship won't work and undemocratic, its also called VPN. ebay sells both 2nd hand and new items, why cannot I buy a 2nd hand item from USA if I want too? I've also bought machined miniature train parts made in the USA from internet web site for
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
For some reason above post was truncated after sending but you get the point
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
Personal slights, 'everyone knows', rants worthy of Cash-for-comment radio and one word silver bullets. Nothing new there.
I don't think any less of anyone for voting LNP, Labor or the Greens; they're only doing what they think is right. Hell, I used to vote Green until recently as I have already confessed.

There's no silver bullet other than to kill that neo-liberalism beast that's off-shored, privatised and destroyed our old fashioned sense of social cohesion. We need to stop perusing the imaginary level playing field and start looking after our own people.
So to use Trump speak, things are bad, real bad. Pockets of high youth unemployment has been an issue for decades and nothing done to date has solved it. My concern is the growing working poor as we look headed down the US path. The world is quite different than it was in the 1950’s, let alone 1970-80’s. I accept that theoretically anything is possible however an open mind doesn’t equate to losing it Laughing
Don't vote Green then, they'll only make it worse. I recall watching Q&A earlier this year and one of those dipsy Green senators was waffling on about the squillions of jobs in green industries absorbing the unemployed. Seriously? All those panels and windmills are made overseas... they have no idea.

The only conclusion that I can come to is that we need some degree of protection for Australian industries and start treating other nations bi-laterally (the same as they treat us). For example, why let Chinese nationals buy up residential property here when we can't do that in China? It's depriving Australians of good, affordable housing in Sydney and Melbourne. Treat Chinese buyers in exactly the same manner as Australians are treated in China - it's only common sense.
don_dunstan
Back in the day, 89 to 97 I lived in Tassie, initially for uni then later worked there. My GF at time had a brother who worked for the Burnie Paper and Pulp Mill before they were forced to clean up their emissions. Its hard to imagine now that driving into town you'd be hit with this toxic choking cloud and the sea had colour and froth and was unfit for swimming.

Ironically he became a hardline Greenie and back then I was younger than him and not experienced enough to argue his conflict of interest with this and other. Anyway, he promoted the Green jobs as tourist guides etc to take Tassie forward.

25 years later
- The bulk of Tasmanian heavy industry has since closed including the Pulp mill (although operated cleaning for about 15 years) and much of the timber industry has since collapsed as over priced and increased use of recycle paper. Note this guys was converting his fathers farm to 50% timber and bought his own.

- Burnie's population has contracted by 10% over 20 years.

- The so called Green jobs have no materialised. Even in UAE if people ask me Tas or NZ, I say NZ Sth Island. Its larger, prettier, cheaper, more options and has less red tape to prevent you enjoying the out doors. In the late 90's mid 2000's the other issue was log trucks. Anyone I know who went to Tas on holidays complained about log trucks after +million tonnes was pulled from rail, much of this is now gone.

- The Tas state govt is basically now an administrator for fed govt spending as they don't generate enough of their own revenue

- The state needs 180% of its GST receipts to balance the budget, ie dependent on Vic/NSW

- The states uni's have since dropped a a number of industrial degrees as no one studies in a state that they cannot get work in the same field.  

- When I was at uni there, I'd say about 50% of the Tasmanian students had plans to buy a one way ticket on their last day out.

If Tasmania formed its own country, the Tasmanian dollar would sink to about 60c Australian.

Is Tasmania the crystal ball for Australia? I don't think so as Sydney especially has alot more to offer the world than Tasmania ever had and we have mining in Qld, NSW and WA and some manufacturing will always remain, but there will be some parallels for sure..
  ElliotProvis Junior Train Controller

Location: Melbourne, Victoria
I think the main problem everyone whose been sucked not the neoliberal lies is that a government runs its "budget" like a household. Whilst federalism has many implications for currency issuing, the belief that the government could ever really go bust like Zimbabwe is silly. If you'd like more info an the alternative take on monetary policy have a read up on Modern Monetary Theory, and some of the lectures by Aussie grown Steve Keen and Bill Mitchell. Both great advocates for academic reform on economic theory.
  don_dunstan The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Adelaide proud
If Tasmania formed its own country, the Tasmanian dollar would sink to about 60c Australian.

Is Tasmania the crystal ball for Australia? I don't think so as Sydney especially has alot more to offer the world than Tasmania ever had and we have mining in Qld, NSW and WA and some manufacturing will always remain, but there will be some parallels for sure..
RTT_Rules
Amanda Vanstone once proposed substantially lower awards for South Australia when SA was falling behind the eastern seaboard in the nineties; South Australia is not cheap in comparison to the rest of Australia any longer so it's hard to imagine that the average SA worker could afford to have their wages cut any better than workers in Sydney or Melbourne.

Interestingly Tom Playford as a Liberal post-war Premier worked in collaboration with Ben Chifley to deliver Elizabeth as a world-leading industrial estate to attract industry to Australia; Chifley reportedly coerced the Commonwealth Bank as a (then) government entity to financially back the establishment of a modern car plant for General Motors at Elizabeth.

The exact opposite is happening in 2017, General Motors is soon to be the last manufacturer to leave a once relatively wealthy area against a backdrop of wages that are in free-fall nationally. It's a complete unravelling of what happened immediately post-war.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
To put it bluntly, post WW2 you only built car assembly lines in countries that usually had a white face as leader of the govt. If they spoke English all the better.

Times have changed. Elizabeth has not.
  don_dunstan The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Adelaide proud
To put it bluntly, post WW2 you only built car assembly lines in countries that usually had a white face as leader of the govt. If they spoke English all the better.

Times have changed. Elizabeth has not.
RTT_Rules
What do you do with the vast suburbs left over after the experiment has failed? We've never really had large scale urban ghettos in Australia before, I guess we are about to find out what that's like.

Meanwhile in Sydney the property boom continues unabated... a mum sensibly buys her 8 year-old son a $900,000 unit for his future (News):

Tania Katsanis won a bidding battle for the two-bedroom, one-bathroom unit in eastern suburbs Randwick at auction this morning, according to realestate.com.au. The unrenovated 1960s unit on The Avenue went for $904,500.
“It’s a nice quiet street and I think it’s a great apartment,” Mrs Katsanis said, describing it as “my son’s future.”
She said she would rent out the property for up to $650 a week until son Andrew, 8, decides whether he want to live in it.
  apw5910 Deputy Commissioner

Location: Location: Location.
Meanwhile in Sydney the property boom continues unabated... a mum sensibly buys her 8 year-old son a $900,000 unit for his future (News):
don_dunstan
Well he obviously picked his parents well. Just like Joe Hockey said you should.
  don_dunstan The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Adelaide proud
Western Australia reportedly considering its own bank tax as the South Australian government has done; Anna Bligh will probably be telling us how it's the end of civilisation if the most profitable banks in the world have to pay one dollar more to the greedy state governments. I bet she's been furiously championing the cause of the poor underdog banks in private lobbying to various politicians too... she's probably worth every cent that the banks are paying her.
  don_dunstan The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Adelaide proud
The thing that I hate the most about the real estate boom is the wholesale destruction of neighbourhoods across Melbourne - an example for you right here in the Herald Sun:

FOUR neighbours have banded together to sell their Caulfield North homes for a combined $8.7 million.

The huge sum — paid by an apartment developer this week — equates to $2.175 million per property. The sellers will split the sale price based on the sizes of their blocks, which make up 2300sq m together.

Now it might sound like a wonderful windfall but the places that are replacing them are monstrous bloody blocks of flats which will overshadow their neighbours on all sides. One of the things that I used to love about Melbourne was the chintzy Californian bungalows in places like Caulfield - now they can't wait to bulldoze them for windfall profits, money is ruining the place. Then you go further out to places like Blackburn where the "new Australians" have demolished and built mega McMansions on nearly every square inch of their block (stuff the trees).

Melbourne's main thoroughfares (particularly in the east) are starting like every other dreary apartment-lined suburb in Sydney... ugly.
  bingley hall Minister for Railways

Location: Last train to Skaville
...... Then you go further out to places like Blackburn where the "new Australians" have demolished and built mega McMansions on nearly every square inch of their block (stuff the trees).

Melbourne's main thoroughfares (particularly in the east) are starting like every other dreary apartment-lined suburb in Sydney... ugly.
don_dunstan

Last week you were portraying immigrants as dole bludgers, this week they're building McMansions......

Anyone see a trend developing here Razz
  don_dunstan The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Adelaide proud
Yeah, I'm a bad person who hankers for the days when unsustainable mass migration didn't destroy the character of our big cities... I'll readily admit to that charge.
  rxclass Junior Train Controller

Location: On the manual turntable at Marino turning an exquisite Rx class steam locomotive.
Western Australia reportedly considering its own bank tax as the South Australian government has done; Anna Bligh will probably be telling us how it's the end of civilisation if the most profitable banks in the world have to pay one dollar more to the greedy state governments. I bet she's been furiously championing the cause of the poor underdog banks in private lobbying to various politicians too... she's probably worth every cent that the banks are paying her.
don_dunstan
G'day all,

According to the 'Australian Newspaper', on the day the her appointment was reported, it was stated that although her salary was not mentioned, it was believed to be in the order of $500,000.00. This on top of her taxpayer funded pension. Unfortunately I did not keep the copy of that day's paper.

There are an enormous number of full page advertisements in the 'Advertiser' authorized by her against the SA Labor Bank tax, however no such advertisements against the LNP Federal Bank Tax.

Regards,
  don_dunstan The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Adelaide proud
Last week you were portraying immigrants as dole bludgers...
bingley hall
What I actually said (or meant) was that we should rethink not charging big $$$ for certain kinds of visas. The fastest growing social security cohort is the age pension - 2.2+ million. We should definitely be thinking about levying a charge on new residents bringing their elderly (pension age) parents over. I think it's reasonable to ring-fence Centrelink and Medicare from people who are seeking to dump their parents onto what's left of our welfare, health and housing systems.
  don_dunstan The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Adelaide proud
G'day all,

According to the 'Australian Newspaper', on the day the her appointment was reported, it was stated that although her salary was not mentioned, it was believed to be in the order of $500,000.00. This on top of her taxpayer funded pension. Unfortunately I did not keep the copy of that day's paper.

There are an enormous number of full page advertisements in the 'Advertiser' authorized by her against the SA Labor Bank tax, however no such advertisements against the LNP Federal Bank Tax.

Regards,
rxclass
She's a prime example of mediocre managerial class wreaking havoc on Australia and personally enriching herself to the tune of millions along the way. Someone should have been charged over the flooding of Brisbane and the mis-management of the Wivenhoe dam directly leading to that situation - there was a traditional Queensland cover-up somewhere there and I'm sure she has intimate knowledge of it.
  don_dunstan The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Adelaide proud
Speaking of development destroying our cities - the very heart and soul of the Sydney CBD is set to be ripped out with billionaire Singaporean developers set to build a whopping big tower on the top of a "sympathetically redeveloped" GPO - Fairfax:

So how much faith should we put in [the heritage] list's capacity to protect the building now? Or in the promises of owner Ms Lay See Shaw, CEO of the Far East Organisation, to be "guided by all relevant state and federal heritage laws and regulations".

Not a lot, perhaps. But the shameful truth is that the building's new owners could hardly be worse – less caring or altruistic – than the governments to whom we look for its, and our, protection.

What's the rush to make Sydney and Melbourne look like Hong Kong? I don't think future generations will thank us for wreaking those public spaces.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
This is the Exc summary on the family reunification scheme which I thought had been heavily cut back.

In contrast to the United States of America, the Australian Government has steadily prioritised skilled migration within Australia’s permanent Migration Program, with proportionally fewer family places available. The current Coalition Government affirms that the focus of the immigration program is primarily economic, not social, and has promised to further prioritise skilled migration over the years ahead. Whilst planning levels clearly depict skilled migration at around two thirds of the overall Migration Program, it is important to acknowledge that over fifty percent of the Skill Stream is in fact comprised of family (secondary visa holders). In this light, family migration still remains at the very heart of Australia’s Migration Program. Although parts of the Family Stream are seen to be a net cost to the Commonwealth budget, overall, family migration presents a net gain both economically and socially. Family structures are particularly important in attracting or keeping skilled migrants—an issue of particular significance in regional areas. A strong grasp of the English language is perceived as one of the best ways to ensure family migrants embrace Australian society and culture

For me, you want to bring out your older parents who are not able to work or work for long periods, the sponsor has to bare some of the cost. This includes housing and income. Should the sponsor's situation change and they themselves lose their job, die or get sick, then yes they would fall back onto welfare. Increasing the fee to apply may put some off and may increase govt revenue, but drop in the ocean compared to funding an aging person, especially if they have health issues.

Potentially you could eliminate the parent from welfare payments for 10 years and the sponsor must provide full medical insurance. It should also be limited to 2 parents per adult resident as well. Any more and you cover all costs. I think this would be fair, but without creating a humanitarian issue.
  don_dunstan The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Adelaide proud
For me, you want to bring out your older parents who are not able to work or work for long periods, the sponsor has to bare some of the cost. This includes housing and income. Should the sponsor's situation change and they themselves lose their job, die or get sick, then yes they would fall back onto welfare. Increasing the fee to apply may put some off and may increase govt revenue, but drop in the ocean compared to funding an aging person, especially if they have health issues.
RTT_Rules
There are different types of visas but the one that I have the most knowledge of is where the parents are sponsored by the adult children for the first five years of their residency during which time they are not able to claim Centrelink or Medicare entitlements.

When working in housing in Melbourne I argued with many people about that point: You are not entitled to any assistance from the Commonwealth or the state government if you are under that scheme, full-stop. If you can't afford to support your parents in Australia any longer then they have to return back to their country of origin because you are actually in breach of that visa. The flip side of that was the amazing number of migrant adult children you'd get escorting their sometimes very elderly parents into the service for no other reason than they'd just got their Centrelink entitlement and were being kicked out of home by their children. I had one elderly Chinese man bawling his eyes out and a son who was very resolute that they were in Australia now and the dad's newly-arrived pension card meant he was out of their house... strange especially to see Chinese people doing this when their culture is apparently to have elderly parents live with them out of respect.

And at that time the situation in Melbourne was starting to look incredibly grim for anyone looking for any kind of public or community housing - the wait lists even for the most urgent of cases were many years. It was at time (in Victoria) where Napthine had re-jigged the public housing waiting list so as to disguise the true nature of the problem.

There's no way in which this system has any hint of sustainability about it - we can't afford to run a decent humanitarian refugee intake as well as take in the dependants from 457/economic migrants AND pay everyone's Centrelink, Medicare and subsidise/provide their housing in Sydney and Melbourne (where most of them end up)... the competition for those resources in those cities is already fierce. At a minimum it should be $100,000+ for each parent visa, full-stop.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
...... Then you go further out to places like Blackburn where the "new Australians" have demolished and built mega McMansions on nearly every square inch of their block (stuff the trees).

Melbourne's main thoroughfares (particularly in the east) are starting like every other dreary apartment-lined suburb in Sydney... ugly.

Last week you were portraying immigrants as dole bludgers, this week they're building McMansions......

Anyone see a trend developing here Razz
bingley hall
Don,
If we roll the clock back,
- 1st you had roo's enjoying the tranquility without humans, 10,000's of years of peace and harmony.
- 2nd you had the roo's complaining about the black residents burning the bush, bringing dogs and throwing spears at them
- 3rd you had the black residents complaining about the new white residents clearing what they didn't burn
- 4th you had the white farmers complaining about their neighbors selling out to these city folk with their weekender hobby farms.
- 5th you had the weekender hobby farms complain about their neighbors selling out for suburban development
- 6th you now have a blow in from SA complaining about them selling out for higher density, medium rise development
- In future you will have them complaining about their neighbor selling out to build higher rise development

So lots of change and lots of complaining at each stage of the change.

As for building on 100% of the block, that started in Melbourne over 20 years ago, probably longer. No eve's, no tree's etc etc and is happening everywhere, except maybe not Adelaide where land isn't in short supply.
  Carnot Minister for Railways

Slight change of topic, but Brexit could be the least of the Poms economic concerns with the explosion of Personal Contract Plans in the past 4 years potentially creating another sub-prime crisis.  Wasn't it SUVs (+ fuel price rises) that were partly responsible for the GFC in the States?

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/jun/10/car-loans-personal-contract-plans-vehicle-financial-crisis-pcp


"A decade ago it was sub-prime mortgages. Could it be sub-prime car loans this time? Cheap finance, the economic spectre of the age, has underpinned much of Britain’s growth over the past three years and there has been no bigger beneficiary of this debt-fuelled largesse than the car industry. But this four-wheeled binge, which reached a record £31.6bn in car loans last year, could have consequences if it veers off the road.

It takes just minutes to fill in the forms for a new kind of loan that cuts the cost of financing to levels that allow people on modest incomes to show up at the supermarket on a Saturday in the latest SUV. Applying takes no time at all, but the payback threatens to last a lot longer."
  Groundrelay Chief Commissioner

Location: Surrounded by Trolls!
Don is barking up the wrong tree. Whilst it plays well to the cash-for-comment lot his foreigner welfare 'thing' is a relatively minuscule cost to the economy.

This country has a progressive tax system that has been undermined by a plethora of concessions. Realistically, only the well off have sufficient income to make the most out of these tax minimisation measures. Winding them back is not only fiscally prudent but more in keeping with the Aussie value of fairness rather than "Greed is good, greed works" Razz
  MILW Junior Train Controller

Location: Earth
Slight change of topic, but Brexit could be the least of the Poms economic concerns with the explosion of Personal Contract Plans in the past 4 years potentially creating another sub-prime crisis.  Wasn't it SUVs (+ fuel price rises) that were partly responsible for the GFC in the States?

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/jun/10/car-loans-personal-contract-plans-vehicle-financial-crisis-pcp


"A decade ago it was sub-prime mortgages. Could it be sub-prime car loans this time? Cheap finance, the economic spectre of the age, has underpinned much of Britain’s growth over the past three years and there has been no bigger beneficiary of this debt-fuelled largesse than the car industry. But this four-wheeled binge, which reached a record £31.6bn in car loans last year, could have consequences if it veers off the road.

It takes just minutes to fill in the forms for a new kind of loan that cuts the cost of financing to levels that allow people on modest incomes to show up at the supermarket on a Saturday in the latest SUV. Applying takes no time at all, but the payback threatens to last a lot longer."
Carnot

Yes, subprime car loans are also an emerging or re-emerging problem in the US according to reports I saw some months ago - that's in addition to housing, university and credit card debt, all of which are in the danger zone. Basically a large proportion of the debt out there is unhealthy. Not sure about Australia. Probably here too, since the general trends are much the same everywhere.
  MILW Junior Train Controller

Location: Earth
Don is barking up the wrong tree. Whilst it plays well to the cash-for-comment lot his foreigner welfare 'thing' is a relatively minuscule cost to the economy.

This country has a progressive tax system that has been undermined by a plethora of concessions. Realistically, only the well off have sufficient income to make the most out of these tax minimisation measures. Winding them back is not only fiscally prudent but more in keeping with the Aussie value of fairness rather than "Greed is good, greed works" Razz
Groundrelay

They might be able to lower some taxes if everyone actually had to pay them. Tax deduction and concession entitlements should be cut. Looks like it's already happening but will they go far enough?

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