ATC for Perth

 
  tonyp Chief Commissioner

Location: Shoalhaven
https://www.railexpress.com.au/wa-budget-fund-planning-for-new-atc-signalling-systems-for-perth-network/

Presumably this will avoid the need for any quadruplication to fit in trains from new lines (e.g. Morley-Ellenbrook) as they are built?

I am wondering how much disruption at present do the TransWA and Indian Pacific services cause to suburban services on their lines and how these long-distance trains will fit into an ATC regime?

Sponsored advertisement

  8888 Chief Commissioner

Location: Shire of Mundaring
https://www.railexpress.com.au/wa-budget-fund-planning-for-new-atc-signalling-systems-for-perth-network/

Presumably this will avoid the need for any quadruplication to fit in trains from new lines (e.g. Morley-Ellenbrook) as they are built?

I am wondering how much disruption at present do the TransWA and Indian Pacific services cause to suburban services on their lines and how these long-distance trains will fit into an ATC regime?
tonyp
Indian Pacific minimal, as it now only visits PTA trackage on weekends.
  steve_w_1990 Junior Train Controller

Location: Trying to fix something on the PTA Network
Quaduplication will still need to happen at some point to keep services moving, even with ATC, you can only physically fit X amount of trains in a given section at any given time. The biggest problem there will be land acquisition.

From what I can gather, ATC is there to reduce the length of sections, the age old principle of block working will still apply. Instead of having lineside automatic signals spaced at say 1500m apart to allow for a train that runs once per week to be able to safely come to a stand, each train will have a system on board that will let them know how far the next train is in front in real time, and then give an indication on a panel inside the train as to what speed it is safe to travel at. This will of course adjust for each train using the system, so a train like the Indian Pacific will have a larger gap between it and the next service in front than a normal suburban train would.

This system is still a fair way off, the Forrestfield line is still being signaled by conventional methods, and its going to cost quite a bit of money to be able to fit out the entire ever growing fleet of railcars to be able to work under ATC, and possibly even more to convert the PTA's nearly 200kms of track (and counting).

TransWA trains and the Indian Pacific are catered for in the working timetable, so if they are running on time, there is no delay to normal services. When the Australind comes in at Armadale of an afternoon for its run to Perth, depending on who is on the panel at Train Control, sometimes they will hold the suburban service in the dock and let the Australind out first, so it doesn't have to follow the C Pattern train to Perth. This is mainly dependant on how quick the Australind can get in and out of Armadale. Should a delay happen, then these services are simply put in where they can fit.
  witzendoz Junior Train Controller

Location: Fremantle
You will still need quadruplicating in part so that non stopping trains can overtake stoppers.  I would imagine that the airport train may not stop at all stations picking out one or two stops to transfer passengers onto the full stoppers.  If not it would be short sightedness.
  awsgc24 Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney
The headway at say 80km/h (22.2 m/s) for a line with 1500m signal spacing would be:
* 500m overlap (if any). This would be reduced by ATP.
* 1500m from Red signal to Yellow signal
* 1500m from Yellow signal to Green signal
* 500m sighting signal distance.
* 1499m fixed block not quite clear. This would be reduced by moving block.
* Total 5499m at 22.2m/s = 247m seconds = 4 min 07 sec.

If signals are replaced at closer spacing, then extra indications such as double Y-Y or Pulsating Y.

Sponsored advertisement

Display from: