Centenary of the Opening of the Trans Australian Railway - Port Augusta

 
  Train1959 Train Controller


Fact 91 / 100 – Station Names

Amongst the station names on the Trans-Australian Railway there were:

16+ derived from aboriginal words or place names
10 after Prime Ministers – the first 7 plus a few later on including the only PM from Tasmania
2 Field Marshalls
2 Governor Generals
1 Minister for Shipping, Fuel and Transport
A doctor
1 WA State Premier
and a Melbourne Cup Winner *

* This one is a bit complicated actually. Tarcoola, the place, is named after Tarcoola the race horse who was born on Tarcoola Station on the Darling River in NSW. Tarcoola won the 1893 Melbourne Cup. Tarcoola is a local aboriginal word from the Darling River area and it means “River Bend” which is something Tarcoola (SA) doesn’t have – a river or a bend! An even more obscure fact is that Tarcoola had 22 starts in its career for 7 wins, it never finished lower then fourth place (that’s Tarcoola the horse, not Tarcoola the place!)

Even more obscurely in 1882 Tarcoola Station in NSW covered over a 1,000,000 acres. However when the Tarcoola lease expired in 1918 the property was divided into 10 separate leases. Burke and Wills passed through Tarcoola Station in 1860 on their ill-fated expedition to the Gulf of Carpentaria.

Tarcoola in South Australia began with the discovery of gold in 1893. However there was no real commercial production until 1900. Tarcoola was proclaimed a town in 1901. Between 1901 – 1954 over 77,000 ounces of gold were mined in the area.      

Sources:  Various

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  M636C Minister for Railways

2 Field Marshalls

Only one "L" in Field Marshal.
In Canberra between the two sets of buildings at Russell Hill there is a square sometimes used for parades.
It was named "Thomas Blamey Square" but someone decided that was too informal and the words:

"Field Marshal Sir"

were added ahead of the existing name. They matched very well so you had to know that they weren't there originally...

Peter
  Train1959 Train Controller

2 Field Marshalls

Only one "L" in Field Marshal.
In Canberra between the two sets of buildings at Russell Hill there is a square sometimes used for parades.
It was named "Thomas Blamey Square" but someone decided that was too informal and the words:

"Field Marshal Sir"

were added ahead of the existing name. They matched very well so you had to know that they weren't there originally...

Peter
M636C
I have a sticky "llllll" on my computer keyboard. Tried cllleaning it but to no availll !
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik

Fact 91 / 100 – Station Names

Amongst the station names on the Trans-Australian Railway there were:

16+ derived from aboriginal words or place names
10 after Prime Ministers – the first 7 plus a few later on including the only PM from Tasmania
2 Field Marshalls
2 Governor Generals
1 Minister for Shipping, Fuel and Transport
A doctor
1 WA State Premier
and a Melbourne Cup Winner *

* This one is a bit complicated actually. Tarcoola, the place, is named after Tarcoola the race horse who was born on Tarcoola Station on the Darling River in NSW. Tarcoola won the 1893 Melbourne Cup. Tarcoola is a local aboriginal word from the Darling River area and it means “River Bend” which is something Tarcoola (SA) doesn’t have – a river or a bend! An even more obscure fact is that Tarcoola had 22 starts in its career for 7 wins, it never finished lower then fourth place (that’s Tarcoola the horse, not Tarcoola the place!)

Even more obscurely in 1882 Tarcoola Station in NSW covered over a 1,000,000 acres. However when the Tarcoola lease expired in 1918 the property was divided into 10 separate leases. Burke and Wills passed through Tarcoola Station in 1860 on their ill-fated expedition to the Gulf of Carpentaria.

Tarcoola in South Australia began with the discovery of gold in 1893. However there was no real commercial production until 1900. Tarcoola was proclaimed a town in 1901. Between 1901 – 1954 over 77,000 ounces of gold were mined in the area.      

Sources:  Various

Train1959
Just for the heck of it:

16+ derived from aboriginal words or place names.

I got 19 between Port Augusta and Kalgoorlie – Zanthus, Naretha, Rawlinna, Wilban, Nurina, Loongana, Mundrabilla, Mungala, Wynbring, Malbooma, Kingoonya, Kultanaby, Coondambo, Wirraminna, Burando, Pimba, Wirrappa, Bookaloo and Hesso .

10 after Prime Ministers – the first 7 plus a few later on including the only PM from Tasmania. Being: Deakin, Fisher, Barton, Lyons, Watson, Cook, Reid, Chifley, Curtin and  Hughes

2 Field Marshalls - Kitchener and Haig originally plus Blamey later  got a mention

2 Governors General - Denman and Ferguson

1 Minister for Shipping, Fuel and Transport – McLeay. More recently O’Malley at the 522 miles from Port Pirie Junction might fit this category.

A doctor - Randells

1 WA State Premier - Forrest

No doubt there have been other additions/deletions since my reference sources were published.
  Train1959 Train Controller


Fact 92 / 100 – Famous Trains  “The Tea and Sugar”

The “Tea and Sugar” train began its life in 1915 servicing some of the most remote locations in the world along the Trans-Australian Railway providing goods and services to workers.

The service gradually increased to also serve many isolated communities along the route. Running between Port Augusta and Kalgoorlie, the train carried groceries and fresh meat (with a butchers van) and also provided banking/pay facilities. Prices were comparable with major cities and towns.  

From the early 1950’s at Christmas time it even bought Father Christmas along to distribute presents to children along the line.

The Tea and Sugar also served as a mail run for the GPO. Mail was delivered to the Stationmaster or similar at all locations where mail was collected by employees and their families.

Eventually, welfare including medical services, a toy library for children and even a separate theatrette car were all part of the service.

The arrival of the train was an event, a break in the monotony of life in these remote locations. People referred to its arrival as “Tea and Sugar Day”. Some women actually dressed up to go to the siding to meet the train in style!

Over the years diesel locomotives replaced steam locomotives (early 1950’s), which cut the number of camps along the line. In the 1970’s camps reduced further as continuously welded rails were introduced, this was followed by concrete sleepers replacing timber sleepers, further reducing track maintenance.

From 1981, services were further restricted. The butcher's van was removed in 1982, although prepacked meat could be ordered at Port Augusta prices. As the size and number of railway settlements decreased along the TAR, the route was shortened to terminate at Cook. The last run of the Tea and Sugar train was in 1996.

Part of the famous train is on display at the National Railway Museum at Port Adelaide.

Sources:  Monte Luke, NRM and National Library of Australia
  Train1959 Train Controller

Fact 93 / 100 – Famous Trains   “The Indian Pacific & Trans-Australian Express”

Trans-Australian Passenger Train

The Trans-Australian Express Passenger train ran between Port Augusta (and later from Port Pirie) and Kalgoorlie. It began in 1917 (sometimes under the name of the Transcontinental or East West Express) and was eventually cancelled in 1991 by the Commonwealth Railways successor organisation Australian National following severely reduced patronage and major cut backs in the frequency of the service. Initially it was all sleeping class with only irregular sit-up passenger accommodation being provided. In the 1960s regular sit-up carriages was incorporated, but this was eventually withdrawn. Sit-up was again introduced in 1981 when it was added to the Trans-Australian and Indian Pacific services.

Indian Pacific

The Indian Pacific had its inaugural run on the 23rd February 1970 when the first through passenger service operated between Sydney and Perth. The standard gauge line had actually been completed by 12th January 1970. All carriages were owned by the Commonwealth Railways, but were considered joint rollingstock of the Commonwealth, South Australian, Western Australian and New South Wales Railways for maintenance and costing purposes.

Passengers for Adelaide initially had to change trains at Port Pirie until the service was re-rerouted into Adelaide and the Keswick Passenger terminal on the 17th of August 1986.

The Indian Pacific, run by Great Southern Rail since privatisation in 1997, remains a world class transcontinental passenger train known worldwide for its high level of service and widely diversified scenic beauty throughout the journey across the continent.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Fact 93 / 100 – Famous Trains   “The Indian Pacific & Trans-Australian Express”

Trans-Australian Passenger Train

The Trans-Australian Express Passenger train ran between Port Augusta (and later from Port Pirie) and Kalgoorlie. It began in 1917 (sometimes under the name of the Transcontinental or East West Express) and was eventually cancelled in 1991 by the Commonwealth Railways successor organisation Australian National following severely reduced patronage and major cut backs in the frequency of the service. Initially it was all sleeping class with only irregular sit-up passenger accommodation being provided. In the 1960s regular sit-up carriages was incorporated, but this was eventually withdrawn. Sit-up was again introduced in 1981 when it was added to the Trans-Australian and Indian Pacific services.

Indian Pacific

The Indian Pacific had its inaugural run on the 23rd February 1970 when the first through passenger service operated between Sydney and Perth. The standard gauge line had actually been completed by 12th January 1970. All carriages were owned by the Commonwealth Railways, but were considered joint rollingstock of the Commonwealth, South Australian, Western Australian and New South Wales Railways for maintenance and costing purposes.

Passengers for Adelaide initially had to change trains at Port Pirie until the service was re-rerouted into Adelaide and the Keswick Passenger terminal on the 17th of August 1986.

The Indian Pacific, run by Great Southern Rail since privatisation in 1997, remains a world class transcontinental passenger train known worldwide for its high level of service and widely diversified scenic beauty throughout the journey across the continent.
Train1959
Costs and revenue associated with the operation of the Trans-Australian and Indian Pacific services were divided on a mileage basis between the operating systems as follows:

Trans-Australian - CR 73.16%,  WAGR 26.86%  (1,108 and 407 miles)

Indian Pacific - NSW 28.4%,  SAR 10.04%,  CR 45.02%,  WA 16.5%  (699, 247, 1108 and 407 miles respectively)

Percentages have been rounded to a trivial degree.
  Train1959 Train Controller

Costs and revenue associated with the operation of the Trans-Australian and Indian Pacific services were divided on a mileage basis between the operating systems as follows:

Trans-Australian - CR 73.16%,  WAGR 26.86%  (1,108 and 407 miles)

Indian Pacific - NSW 28.4%,  SAR 10.04%,  CR 45.02%,  WA 16.5%  (699, 247, 1108 and 407 miles respectively)

Percentages have been rounded to a trivial degree.



I have nothing better to do as this is better than what has just happened at the MCG!

I vaguely recall (very vaguely) that the Commonwealth Railways were never very impressed with the NSWGR especially (not sure about the others) with their lack of payment for their rollingstock contribution for the IP. It think it was more to do with the payments never being on time. You may be able enlighten me on this.........................
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Costs and revenue associated with the operation of the Trans-Australian and Indian Pacific services were divided on a mileage basis between the operating systems as follows:

Trans-Australian - CR 73.16%,  WAGR 26.86%  (1,108 and 407 miles)

Indian Pacific - NSW 28.4%,  SAR 10.04%,  CR 45.02%,  WA 16.5%  (699, 247, 1108 and 407 miles respectively)

Percentages have been rounded to a trivial degree.



I have nothing better to do as this is better than what has just happened at the MCG!

I vaguely recall (very vaguely) that the Commonwealth Railways were never very impressed with the NSWGR especially (not sure about the others) with their lack of payment for their rollingstock contribution for the IP. It think it was more to do with the payments never being on time. You may be able enlighten me on this.........................
Train1959
I agree anybody except Richmond...............

I don't know about the NSWGR paying their bills or not but NSW was always, then and now, a system apart. I remember during the Indian Pacific commencement planning that NSW was absolutely aghast that CR served coffee and chocolate mints to first class passengers in the lounge car after dinner. This, of course, made sense as it expedited dining car occupancy during dinner 'without appearing to do so'.

On the other hand, there was nothing that the NSWGR could not do if it was in their mind to do so. They had the rolling stock, crews, locomotives, alternative routes, flexibility and staff to do absolutely anything at any time provided 'it was in their mind to do so'. The NSWGR was a great system.
  M636C Minister for Railways

Indian Pacific - NSW 28.4%,  SAR 10.04%,  CR 45.02%,  WA 16.5%  (699, 247, 1108 and 407 miles respectively)

The SAR opposed a standard gauge connection to Adelaide for years at least partly because it was expected that this would be operated by the CR and involve a loss of revenue to the SAR.

I am of the impression that even when the Red Hill - Port Pirie line was opened eighty years ago, a condition was that the SAR continued to receive the share of revenue equal to the route from Quorn to Adelaide rather than Port Pirie to Adelaide and this continued until the formation of AN, and would have increased the SAR share of revenue from the Indian Pacific to slightly more than the Broken Hill to Port Pirie section.

Peter
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Indian Pacific - NSW 28.4%,  SAR 10.04%,  CR 45.02%,  WA 16.5%  (699, 247, 1108 and 407 miles respectively)

The SAR opposed a standard gauge connection to Adelaide for years at least partly because it was expected that this would be operated by the CR and involve a loss of revenue to the SAR.

I am of the impression that even when the Red Hill - Port Pirie line was opened eighty years ago, a condition was that the SAR continued to receive the share of revenue equal to the route from Quorn to Adelaide rather than Port Pirie to Adelaide and this continued until the formation of AN, and would have increased the SAR share of revenue from the Indian Pacific to slightly more than the Broken Hill to Port Pirie section.

Peter
M636C
Not saying that what you say isn't true but CR was by-passing the BG Adelaide to Pirie section for years using road transport to Port Augusta.

There has always been a school of thought in rail that 100% of $10 was better than 75% of $1,000. One only has to look at how Victoria clung for so long to so many BG lines simply to keep out the competition that was possible with SG.

On the other hand, when the WAGR SG to Kalgoorlie opened it increased the NG distance of 380 miles to 407 miles for the SG. When this happened the WA proportion of freight charges was capped at 380 miles but for how long I don't remember.
  MetroFemme Chief Train Controller

Love the story about the tea and sugar train you can imagine what it must have been like way back then when the only way to get goods to you would be a long walk, a long drive or the train.
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
This thread has been the best one I can remember. The concept of 100 facts in serial format is brilliant, and the information has been staggering. Add to this the amount of comment and extra information that people have posted, and it has been a winner from day 1.
Well done, and thank you, Train1959.
  crisfitz Chief Commissioner

Location: Enroute somewhere

Fact 92 / 100 – Famous Trains  “The Tea and Sugar”

The “Tea and Sugar” train began its life in 1915 servicing some of the most remote locations in the world along the Trans-Australian Railway providing goods and services to workers.

The service gradually increased to also serve many isolated communities along the route. Running between Port Augusta and Kalgoorlie, the train carried groceries and fresh meat (with a butchers van) and also provided banking/pay facilities. Prices were comparable with major cities and towns.  

From the early 1950’s at Christmas time it even bought Father Christmas along to distribute presents to children along the line.

The Tea and Sugar also served as a mail run for the GPO. Mail was delivered to the Stationmaster or similar at all locations where mail was collected by employees and their families.

Eventually, welfare including medical services, a toy library for children and even a separate theatrette car were all part of the service.

The arrival of the train was an event, a break in the monotony of life in these remote locations. People referred to its arrival as “Tea and Sugar Day”. Some women actually dressed up to go to the siding to meet the train in style!

Over the years diesel locomotives replaced steam locomotives (early 1950’s), which cut the number of camps along the line. In the 1970’s camps reduced further as continuously welded rails were introduced, this was followed by concrete sleepers replacing timber sleepers, further reducing track maintenance.

From 1981, services were further restricted. The butcher's van was removed in 1982, although prepacked meat could be ordered at Port Augusta prices. As the size and number of railway settlements decreased along the TAR, the route was shortened to terminate at Cook. The last run of the Tea and Sugar train was in 1996.

Part of the famous train is on display at the National Railway Museum at Port Adelaide.

Sources:  Monte Luke, NRM and National Library of Australia
Train1959
A remanent of the Tea and Sugar remained on the Sunday Loongana Lime service from Parkeston until the early 2000's. We used to detach wagons of stores at Naretha, Rawlinna, Nurina and Loongana - picking up the empty vans on the way home the following day.
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
Love the story about the tea and sugar train you can imagine what it must have been like way back then when the only way to get goods to you would be a long walk, a long drive or the train.
MetroFemme
The only town of any substance between Port Augusta and Kalgoorlie was Woomera, quite a long drive, let alone walk.
The Tea & Sugar WAS the only corner deli!
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
This thread has been the best one I can remember. The concept of 100 facts in serial format is brilliant, and the information has been staggering. Add to this the amount of comment and extra information that people have posted, and it has been a winner from day 1.
Well done, and thank you, Train1959.
Valvegear
^^ What he said ^^

Train1959, I agree with Valvegear, this has been an excellent thread so a big thanks to you and all those who have contributed with extra info
  Spletsie Chief Commissioner

Love the story about the tea and sugar train you can imagine what it must have been like way back then when the only way to get goods to you would be a long walk, a long drive or the train.
The only town of any substance between Port Augusta and Kalgoorlie was Woomera, quite a long drive, let alone walk.
The Tea & Sugar WAS the only corner deli!
Pressman
I can remember reading somewhere that at one stage Cook had a school and a hospital.
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
Love the story about the tea and sugar train you can imagine what it must have been like way back then when the only way to get goods to you would be a long walk, a long drive or the train.
The only town of any substance between Port Augusta and Kalgoorlie was Woomera, quite a long drive, let alone walk.
The Tea & Sugar WAS the only corner deli!
I can remember reading somewhere that at one stage Cook had a school and a hospital.
Spletsie
Yes but no "Corner Deli"
  CPH8 Locomotive Fireman

And Forrest was the overnight stop for the air service Adelaide - Ceduna - Forrest - Kalgoorlie - Perth twice a week in the 1930's so there would have been some civilisation there.
  Train1959 Train Controller

Yes but no "Corner Deli" (Cook)

But it did have a CR Store as did Rawlinna from memory. I think Cook had quite a population at one time. The school building is still there but most buildings/houses have disappeared over the years.

I actually have a film about Cook that I may show as part of the exhibition, it is from the late 80's I think.

Thanks for the kind words of late. However my knowledge will be severely tested with the remaining facts as we delve in modern history, amalgamations, privatisations, foreign companies and a myriad of different owners and modern day statistics!

I am sure if I get it wrong someone will point me in the right direction!  Next FACT update Tuesday.

Over the next week or so I will also update everyone on the events happening on the 22nd of October in Port Augusta.

You can also check out our Facebook page if you wish "TAR-100 Port Augusta"

I think this link will work.............    https://www.facebook.com/TAR-100-Port-Augusta-2087590428127746/
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
There was also a Provision Store at Tarcoola. As has been said, Cook had a hospital run by the BCAS* (IIRC) and a swimming pool. Cook had two streets of houses at the end of steam. There was also a hospital at Kingoona*.

Coonana was a double camp and included a school run by the WA Education Department which included a couple of secondary levels as well. (Worked for years with a bloke who used to go to Coonana for his Annual Leave)! Smile

Forrest was a 'busy place' with a Civil Aviation presence as well as Bureau of Meteorology personnel. There was possibly also a PMG presence there but I am not positive about this.

A Lutheran Pastor did regular visits to the camps along the TAR for many years, mainly on the Tea and Sugar. (Pastor Noack from Port Pirie ????).

The foregoing is all memory from a long time ago so open to correction.

* Bush Church Aid Society - an Anglican organisation.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
And Forrest was the overnight stop for the air service Adelaide - Ceduna - Forrest - Kalgoorlie - Perth twice a week in the 1930's so there would have been some civilisation there.
CPH8
Biggest plane into Forrest to my knowledge was a DC 9 although 4 engine piston engine DC 4s were regulars I have been told.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Love the story about the tea and sugar train you can imagine what it must have been like way back then when the only way to get goods to you would be a long walk, a long drive or the train.
The only town of any substance between Port Augusta and Kalgoorlie was Woomera, quite a long drive, let alone walk.
The Tea & Sugar WAS the only corner deli!
I can remember reading somewhere that at one stage Cook had a school and a hospital.
Yes but no "Corner Deli"
Pressman
Weekly shopping would be good training for a lot of 'housekeepers' these days rather than in the car to the supermarket or 7/11 (heaven forbid) every day or so. It only requires a bit of planning and discipline. Rolling Eyes
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
Biggest plane into Forrest to my knowledge was a DC 9 although 4 engine piston engine DC 4s were regulars I have been told.
"YM-Mundrabilla"
I doubt that anything bigger would use Forrest; both runways are under 5,000 feet in length.
  duttonbay Minister for Railways

Weekly shopping would be good training for a lot of 'housekeepers' these days rather than in the car to the supermarket or 7/11 (heaven forbid) every day or so. It only requires a bit of planning and discipline. Rolling Eyes
YM-Mundrabilla
Why? Once a week buy a whole bunch of meat which needs to be put into the freezer. I would much prefer my meat and fish to be eaten fresh, unfrozen, and bought on a daily or every second day trip to the local butcher or fish monger.

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