Ixion 32 class DCC sound

 
  disasterrisk Station Master

I would appreciate comments from modellers who have fitted sound cards to this model. I have heard that the resulting sound leaves a bit to be desired.
Regards, ken

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  DJPeters Assistant Commissioner

From what I have read in overseas magazine's about fitting sound decoders to any locomotive the sound is only as good as you can get it. But any RTR locomotive sound can be improved upon. I do not have sound in my locomotives unless it came with it but I do not really use at all. But if you are dis - satisfied with the RTR sound decoder or the sound itself then it is really a case of improving it either by fitting a better sound decoder or altering the body of the locomotive or the housings etc on the mech to make the sound, sound better.

All RTR sound units could be improved I have read, but each one is different so you have to experiment a bit to get it sounding right to you. Also what sounds right to one person might not sound right to the next person as well. You cannot please everyone when doing things like this!
  DJPeters Assistant Commissioner

There are quite a few videos on Youtube and possibly other like sites about upgrading sound and a lot of other things as well. all you need to do is type it in and hit search and it should bring up quite a few of them for you!
  Roachie Chief Commissioner

Location: Kadina SA (formerly NSW)
There are a couple of different aspects to this question.

To my ear, the typical sound decoders for steam locos are not prototypical in their sound reproduction.

However, I've heard some locos done by a couple of the "experts" in this field and they have managed to tweak their chosen decoders so there is a definite "drift" feature. THAT is the biggest bugbear on my ears....an out-of-the-box sound decoder will simply NOT do away with the distinctive exhaust beat (what is often called the "chuff") as the loco slows down and comes to a stop. So you have a loco hauling a train, coming into a station and still "chuffing" as it comes to a stand.

The prototype driver shuts off the steam regulator quite some distance before coming to a stop at a station (or wherever) and there is NO chuffing evident.

I can't think of the blokes name at the moment, but there is a chap who has really mastered this....

Then there is Gerry Hopkins....he's pretty damned good too.

The second aspect that makes a HUGE difference is the speaker....size, type and placement. Even a great speaker can sound ridiculous if it is placed in the most obvious place....the tender.

Roachie

PS: just found it... Linton Towell is the "master"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nkvpH663lrs
  disasterrisk Station Master

From what I have read in overseas magazine's about fitting sound decoders to any locomotive the sound is only as good as you can get it. But any RTR locomotive sound can be improved upon. I do not have sound in my locomotives unless it came with it but I do not really use at all. But if you are dis - satisfied with the RTR sound decoder or the sound itself then it is really a case of improving it either by fitting a better sound decoder or altering the body of the locomotive or the housings etc on the mech to make the sound, sound better.

All RTR sound units could be improved I have read, but each one is different so you have to experiment a bit to get it sounding right to you. Also what sounds right to one person might not sound right to the next person as well. You cannot please everyone when doing things like this!
DJPeters
Thank you for the comment
regards
Ken
  disasterrisk Station Master

There are a couple of different aspects to this question.

To my ear, the typical sound decoders for steam locos are not prototypical in their sound reproduction.

However, I've heard some locos done by a couple of the "experts" in this field and they have managed to tweak their chosen decoders so there is a definite "drift" feature. THAT is the biggest bugbear on my ears....an out-of-the-box sound decoder will simply NOT do away with the distinctive exhaust beat (what is often called the "chuff") as the loco slows down and comes to a stop. So you have a loco hauling a train, coming into a station and still "chuffing" as it comes to a stand.

The prototype driver shuts off the steam regulator quite some distance before coming to a stop at a station (or wherever) and there is NO chuffing evident.

I can't think of the blokes name at the moment, but there is a chap who has really mastered this....

Then there is Gerry Hopkins....he's pretty damned good too.

The second aspect that makes a HUGE difference is the speaker....size, type and placement. Even a great speaker can sound ridiculous if it is placed in the most obvious place....the tender.

Roachie

PS: just found it... Linton Towell is the "master"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nkvpH663lrs


Rochie
Thank you for the information
Regards
Ken
Roachie
  disasterrisk Station Master

Roachie
Thank you for the information.
Ken
  a6et Minister for Railways

Roachie
Thank you for the information.
Ken
disasterrisk
Linton is tops with sound and uses Loksound decoders which are expensive, Linton also has done his own recordings which helps as most sound decoders are really generic, it also helps if you know correct sounds but for many its just a matter of, if it sounds like a steam or diesel locomotive that's all that matters.

One of the biggest, if not biggest problems in getting good sound is the speaker, our small HO steam loco's have limited space for the speakers which in general are small. The bigger the speaker usually equates with better quality in the sound reproduction and more faithful reproduction of the sounds.

The majority of Aus sound fitted to decoders in many instances are wrong, and for certain classes the recordings are from other preserved steam loco's so there is also the aspect that what you get has been recorded from another loco type meaning you get wrong sounds.  Other decoders are basically all recordings of American loco's but some are close to ours in some area's but not all.
  DJPeters Assistant Commissioner

Roachie
Thank you for the information.
Ken
Linton is tops with sound and uses Loksound decoders which are expensive, Linton also has done his own recordings which helps as most sound decoders are really generic, it also helps if you know correct sounds but for many its just a matter of, if it sounds like a steam or diesel locomotive that's all that matters.

One of the biggest, if not biggest problems in getting good sound is the speaker, our small HO steam loco's have limited space for the speakers which in general are small. The bigger the speaker usually equates with better quality in the sound reproduction and more faithful reproduction of the sounds.

The majority of Aus sound fitted to decoders in many instances are wrong, and for certain classes the recordings are from other preserved steam loco's so there is also the aspect that what you get has been recorded from another loco type meaning you get wrong sounds.  Other decoders are basically all recordings of American loco's but some are close to ours in some area's but not all.
a6et
One other thing too is that not all diesels have a sound sample for them. So in some cases it is a choice of a near enough sound or no sound at all. Some or maybe most English Electric diesels would fall into this category though as they are several different types of diesel engines in the E/E range and they come in 4/6/8 and upwards piston arrangements as well. So if your model say has a six cylinder engine in it then you might be forced to use either a 4 or a 8  cylinder recording to get it to at least sound like an E/E loco. Simply because the 6 cylinder engine was not used much or something. I am not saying you cannot get E/E recordings etc, but just using it as a example.
  a6et Minister for Railways

Roachie
Thank you for the information.
Ken
Linton is tops with sound and uses Loksound decoders which are expensive, Linton also has done his own recordings which helps as most sound decoders are really generic, it also helps if you know correct sounds but for many its just a matter of, if it sounds like a steam or diesel locomotive that's all that matters.

One of the biggest, if not biggest problems in getting good sound is the speaker, our small HO steam loco's have limited space for the speakers which in general are small. The bigger the speaker usually equates with better quality in the sound reproduction and more faithful reproduction of the sounds.

The majority of Aus sound fitted to decoders in many instances are wrong, and for certain classes the recordings are from other preserved steam loco's so there is also the aspect that what you get has been recorded from another loco type meaning you get wrong sounds.  Other decoders are basically all recordings of American loco's but some are close to ours in some area's but not all.
One other thing too is that not all diesels have a sound sample for them. So in some cases it is a choice of a near enough sound or no sound at all. Some or maybe most English Electric diesels would fall into this category though as they are several different types of diesel engines in the E/E range and they come in 4/6/8 and upwards piston arrangements as well. So if your model say has a six cylinder engine in it then you might be forced to use either a 4 or a 8  cylinder recording to get it to at least sound like an E/E loco. Simply because the 6 cylinder engine was not used much or something. I am not saying you cannot get E/E recordings etc, but just using it as a example.
DJPeters
Its not confined to just EE engines either as it also applies to older Caterpillar sounds as well, likewise the sounds for CPH, is terrible as found with the Sound model, more akin to marbles in a tin than what they sounded like.

The other aspect for the diesel modellers is the various air horn sounds more especially those in the early generation diesels, and 5 chimes fitted, those out operating these days have much harsher sounds to them then found on the original diesels, this applies to NSW as I cannot comment on other states diesels.  The preserved and operational 40cl is known to have a faulty trumpet at least that's the reason put out for the terrible sound it has when running.

The same is true on the LVR 59cl as the whistle is terrible compared to how they were in regular service.

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