MetroCard or Daytrip ticket?

 
  stooge spark Train Controller

Hello
I'm planning on heading off to Adelaide in a few days to see what it's like there.
The problem is that i'm having a tough time deciding if a daytrip Metroticket or just buying a Metrocard.
Does the Metrocard have any cap at all? It's not mentioned on their website (or at least I just can't find it) If it doesn't then I'm most likely going to just get a Daytrip ticket.
I'm only going to be there for just a day (14 hours.)
Thank you for any responses.

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  ARG706 Chief Commissioner

Location: SA
Unfortunately, the Metrocard does not have a daily cap, and probably never will. Adelaide is behind the times compared to eastern states, and will always will be due to the government wanting every single cent out of our wallets.

So please do yourself a favour and buy a daytrip, but only if your trip is going to include a minimum of 2 inter-peak validations and two peak/after hours validations. If you plan to travel in inter-peak only, then use the card. This is for weekdays only. On Saturdays, it's full price all day, and on Sundays and public holidays, it's inter-peak fares all day (6 validations required to make it practical to purchase a daytrip, 2 hours and 1 minute apart).

There is a fee for the purchase of the card, no matter whether you've lost it or whatever. So if you don't own one, you may need to compare the cost of purchasing one compared to the price of a day trip.

Let's hope you end up surrendering as little revenue to the DPTI as possible.
  Dangersdan707 Chief Commissioner

Location: On a Thing with Internet
Don’t bother with the metro card if your there for 14hrs, get a ticket instead at the station or on the bus.
  Aaron Minister for Railways

Location: University of Adelaide SA
Two peak trips purchased on board exceeds the cost of a daytrip ticket, so if you're riding before 0900 and after 1500 on the same day, buy a daytrip.
  ARG706 Chief Commissioner

Location: SA
You're referring to standard 2 hour tickets. The card has a reduced fare cost, provided you use it with full knowledge of exactly when you will be validating in regards to the two hour window. If you're going from somewhere the city, there can be a difference between boarding at R1 North Tce, and Y1 Currie St.

Boarding as early as possible recently prevented an additional charge due to it just fitting within the two hour window, and also enabled me to get my preferred seat. A daytrip does give you unlimited validations until 4:30 AM the next day, but you need to be sure that you're getting value out of it.

My validations on a recent Saturday would have amounted to nearly $10 if I had used my card instead. It's dodgy as, but I've mentioned it again and again to the same brick wall.
  justapassenger Chief Commissioner

For the sake of convenience, I would recommend the Daytrip even though a day with mostly interpeak travel may be slightly cheaper with Metrocard.

The main points against using a Metrocard for a one day visit are that an unused balance is not refundable (only transferrable to another Metrocard) and you can't top up on a bus. If you come up short on a bus, you need to purchase a paper ticket at a higher price.

There is a fee for the purchase of the card, no matter whether you've lost it or whatever. So if you don't own one, you may need to compare the cost of purchasing one compared to the price of a day trip.
ARG706
There is now no fee for purchasing a new Metrocard.

Adelaide is behind the times compared to eastern states, and will always will be due to the government wanting every single cent out of our wallets.
ARG706
Metrocard is a simple and reliable off-the-shelf system, which was delivered within budget and on time by the French company Crouzet.

Compare that to the fiasco seen in Victoria, where Myki was custom developed. It cost a bomb, still isn't finished and replacement is already being considered.

Our fares are cheaper, which is what matters at the end of the day. I hope that stooge spark enjoys his day of heavily subsidised travel.
  ARG706 Chief Commissioner

Location: SA


Compare that to the fiasco seen in Victoria, where Myki was custom developed. It cost a bomb, still isn't finished and replacement is already being considered.

Our fares are cheaper, which is what matters at the end of the day. I hope that stooge spark enjoys his day of heavily subsidised travel.
"justapassenger"


Any comment suggesting that the Adelaide system is perfect..... I object to such a statement, and the Melbourne system is irrelevant to this discussion.

There seem to be so many that are passionately against the idea of a daily cap on the card, which is probably why it will never be implemented. Wouldn't be surprised if there's protests in front of Government house if such an advancement leaks through to the media.

Seems like almost nobody in this neck of the woods seems to want unlimited validations at the cost of a daytrip for their 'smart card' within a 24 hour window.
  patsstuffnow Junior Train Controller

On reading this post it seems to raise  a couple of questions of balance.
I assume you will be coming from interstate?

The difference between day tripper and metrocard multi validations is a couple of  dollars.

If we factor in the cost of getting to Adelaide I would suggest the small variation would be minor in comparison to the cost of getting to Adelaide.
People talking about a night out drinking would be spending a lot more on liquid libations than a dollar or three on a false validation.

Assuming your arrival in SA is by air it would be easier to purchase a day trip ticket from the bus driver at the airport.

The only benefit in buying ( or receiving now for free) a Metrocard is you could take a piece of plastic home with you, but to obtain one you need to leave the airport, or bus station and get to somewhere to obtain it at what cost?
Before 9am it will cost you an extra $5.20 for a bus fare to the city. And that validation would cut into the number of validations needed on a metcard to use for 14 hours.


2 recent guests of mine suffered confusion because they did not need to logout of the system.
This was in contrast to other places around the world they had experienced. They thought that just over six dollars to go from Grange to city to Glenelg and return was good value. The fact that they could not do this to Semaphore or Glenelg over Easter was of more  concern. In other world places they had travelled  the log in log out determines the fare.

Of more concern to me is if the services are operating. Living in the Western suburbs makes train travel rather difficult.

Today my housemates needed to cross town on a non city bound service. It was cancelled because they were doing roadworks. So they took the train to Woodville and transferred to the 100 which was lucky as the train was actually operating today for a change.
.
  justapassenger Chief Commissioner

Any comment suggesting that the Adelaide system is perfect..... I object to such a statement, and the Melbourne system is irrelevant to this discussion.
ARG706
Care to point me in the direction of any comments suggesting that the Adelaide system is perfect? I certainly didn't say that (only that Metrocard is not bad on balance) and I don't think anyone else did either.

If the system in Melbourne is so irrelevant, why did you introduce the topic of comparisons with interstate systems?

The only benefit in buying ( or receiving now for free) a Metrocard is you could take a piece of plastic home with you, but to obtain one you need to leave the airport, or bus station and get to somewhere to obtain it at what cost?
patsstuffnow
The new ones with the photo on the front would be a nice little souvenir of a trip to Adelaide. SATC and DPTI did well with that campaign.

As for interstate/international visitors arriving, there are these options for 3/4 methods by which visitors arrive:
- Metrocards are available at the airport WHSmith store, right outside the front door. The people on the SATC desk know to direct people there.
- There are a bunch of convenience stores quite close to the Central Bus Station which would sell Metrocards.
- When cruise ships are in at Outer Harbor, the rail station has a staffed ticket retail and information office.

The exception among all forms of interstate/international passenger transport serving Adelaide is, of course, rail. Imagine GSR doing something as customer friendly as organising convenient access to the local public transport network, now there's a laugh!
  stooge spark Train Controller

On reading this post it seems to raise  a couple of questions of balance.
I assume you will be coming from interstate?

The difference between day tripper and metrocard multi validations is a couple of  dollars.

If we factor in the cost of getting to Adelaide I would suggest the small variation would be minor in comparison to the cost of getting to Adelaide.
People talking about a night out drinking would be spending a lot more on liquid libations than a dollar or three on a false validation.

Assuming your arrival in SA is by air it would be easier to purchase a day trip ticket from the bus driver at the airport.

The only benefit in buying ( or receiving now for free) a Metrocard is you could take a piece of plastic home with you, but to obtain one you need to leave the airport, or bus station and get to somewhere to obtain it at what cost?
Before 9am it will cost you an extra $5.20 for a bus fare to the city. And that validation would cut into the number of validations needed on a metcard to use for 14 hours.


2 recent guests of mine suffered confusion because they did not need to logout of the system.
This was in contrast to other places around the world they had experienced. They thought that just over six dollars to go from Grange to city to Glenelg and return was good value. The fact that they could not do this to Semaphore or Glenelg over Easter was of more  concern. In other world places they had travelled  the log in log out determines the fare.

Of more concern to me is if the services are operating. Living in the Western suburbs makes train travel rather difficult.

Today my housemates needed to cross town on a non city bound service. It was cancelled because they were doing roadworks. So they took the train to Woodville and transferred to the 100 which was lucky as the train was actually operating today for a change.
.
patsstuffnow
No, I won't be travelling by air, by coach instead.
Thanks for the heads up regarding the trains by the way
  BigShunter Chief Commissioner

Location: St Clair. S.A.
Hello
I'm planning on heading off to Adelaide in a few days to see what it's like there.
stooge spark

Well stooge, I can tell you it's really nice, so you won't have too come over after all and have multiple problems, with which ticket or day pass, too buy.

BigShunter.
  ARG706 Chief Commissioner

Location: SA
Care to point me in the direction of any comments suggesting that the Adelaide system is perfect? I certainly didn't say that (only that Metrocard is not bad on balance) and I don't think anyone else did either.
"justapassenger"


I was probably just having a bit of a rant there. And there are no posts that compliment the Adelaide system to that degree fortunately... And I did mention Melbourne, so yes I may have contradicted myself in that regard.

But my point is that every DPTI worker I've spoken to regarding a potential daily cap has pointed their finger right in the direction of the too hard basket.

It is not impossible to redesign the system so that it can be more passenger friendly, not matter how much of a PITA it may be. Until one is introduced, I will always consider Adelaide to be way behind most other states in regards to the integrity of the current system.

There may be some positive factors regarding the smart card, but there are obvious downsides not excluding the aforementioned. It is probably more annoying to me than what it is to many others, as I tend to ride PT vehicles more frequently, than the traditional commuter.
  DJPeters Assistant Commissioner

The thing with Adelaide Metro cards is that they are simple to use just get on validate it and sit down then when you leave the vehicle just walk out the door. Having to vailidate it on boarding and then revalidate it upon leaving is just confusing and would slow things down a lot, like boarding times etc. A train etc packed to the rafters is going to take time to swipe on and swipe off so just giving the two hour window makes it a lot easier to use. Not everyone is tech savy and I say leave it simple as the simple things in life often work the best anyway.

By the way Myki in Melbourne and the Opal card in Sydney are both not what you would call a success, a failure in the long run maybe because it involves too much for normal people to comprehend the logging off part anyway. People in a hurry will forget it, but here in SA it is no big deal it just expires at the end of 2 hours. During that 2 hours you can go almost anywhere with no need to get another ticket or use another trip so in that respect it is better to start with.

So why change something that works well here simply because some dolt overseas does it a different way. The system must work here otherwise it would have been replaced when Crouzet went belly up years back. I have friends from Melbourne and Sydney that have come to Adelaide and all say that the ticketing system and Metrocard here is a lot simplier and easier to use than what they have. So maybe we are better off than interstate but just do not know it!
  Aaron Minister for Railways

Location: University of Adelaide SA
^^ Posted by someone who’s not been to NSW or Victoria and actually used an Opal or MYKI card...
  kipioneer Chief Commissioner

Location: Aberfoyle Park
If "tapping off" is so much a problem then don't go to Perth, both trains and buses, London, within the TfL area entering and leaving stations, and boarding buses with daily cap,

Or Hong Kong or Singapore, for that matter.    Johannesburg is another.

The USA position, In LA, San Francisco, Chicago and New York would seem to be to charge by trip, each boarding counting as a trip, but with a purely nominal fare like $2.00.   LA has a daily ticket that is good value if you do more then 3 or 4 trips.
  stooge spark Train Controller

Regarding DJs comments on validation, how do you do this in Adelaide?
Also thanks to the various helpful people in this thread. I'm ultimately going to use a daytrip to travel mostly because I expect to use it quite a bit in the peaks, I just need a few more things cleared up.
  ARG706 Chief Commissioner

Location: SA
^^ Posted by someone who’s not been to NSW or Victoria and actually used an Opal or MYKI card...
"Aaron"


You are making this assumption without any proof. I have actually used the Myki card just under 5 years ago, despite only needing to make two trips. This was because single trip tickets were not an option.

However, having not been to Melbourne since 2013 or used the PT there regularly, I cannot jump to a conclusion regarding this system without further experience.

If I do decide to head to Melbourne for whatever reason at some point and catch PT there, I will possibly come up with a more detailed analysis.
  justapassenger Chief Commissioner

Regarding DJs comments on validation, how do you do this in Adelaide?
stooge spark
Each time you board a vehicle or enter/exit the paid platform area at Adelaide/Noarlunga/Salisbury stations, touch the Metrocard to the validator or insert the paper ticket into the red slot.

You get a green light and pleasant ping if it is accepted, a red light and an angry buzz if it is rejected. The LCD display on the validator will also show the remaining balance if you're using a Metrocard.
  DJPeters Assistant Commissioner

^^ Posted by someone who’s not been to NSW or Victoria and actually used an Opal or MYKI card...
Aaron
What has that got to do with it Aaron my friends use myki or opal not me and I stated that and they are the ones that said it not me. I had one visit me recently from NSW and he said the ticketing etc here was a lot better and simpler than the balls up that opalcard has become in Sydney.  Similar comments come from those friends of mine that use Myki in Melbourne as well.

So please keep your snide remarks to your self thank you!

They are the ones that are using it not me, and they know the ins and outs of the cards as well in each state they are in as they both use them daily to get to work etc. I suppose you use a opal or a myki card daily I assume.

Their main gripe is tapping off all the time, once they saw here how you get two hours of  unlimited travel for a simple validation, their next words were cant we get this in our transport systems.

It does not have to be involved and actually the less involved the system is the more might travel, which is what Metro card was bought in for in the first place just touch on and ride.
  Aaron Minister for Railways

Location: University of Adelaide SA
My comment wasn’t directed at you ARG706, it was directed the Mr Peters.

What has your obvious complete lack of use got to do with MYKI and Opal Mr Peters? A lot, for one thing, anyone who has used it even just a moderate amount can tell you’ve not used it. If you have indeed been told how it works by ‘your friends’ then we can further deduce that their explanation was not very good, or you didn’t understand what they were saying.

Where are your friends forgetting to tap off?
  patsstuffnow Junior Train Controller

Tapping on and off actually speeds up the system as it is mostly  done on the platform , so I think your invisible friends from interstate may have mislead you.

Recent actual guests of mine from China, France, Germany and Japan have all commented on the quaint system here.  

Try going on a train in Japan, getting pushed on by a pusher and then finding your way to a validator!!
It is all done off vehicle.

But never let the truth get in the way of a fairy story.
  Aaron Minister for Railways

Location: University of Adelaide SA
Tapping on and off actually speeds up the system as it is mostly  done on the platform , so I think your invisible friends from interstate may have mislead you.

Recent actual guests of mine from China, France, Germany and Japan have all commented on the quaint system here.  

Try going on a train in Japan, getting pushed on by a pusher and then finding your way to a validator!!
It is all done off vehicle.

But never let the truth get in the way of a fairy story.
patsstuffnow
Ah, you gave the game away! That said, it's nice to know that at least two of us can spot smeg when we see it.

His 'friends' either don't exist, or are grossly misleading him, tapping off takes nearly no time, and unless you're a near cretin is kind of either mandatory, or very difficult to forget. I had the gross misfortune to recently have to spend much more time than I'd like in the east - not ONCE did I forget to tap off.

I say that as a person who was among the first 'civilians' to be given a Metrocard, and the first non government employee to have auto recharge on the Metrocard (my then girlfriend was the second, about 20 mins after me, that's how long it took the IT guy to set it up all manually and check the function in those first days) - hence no one here has had a Metrocard longer than me, and us SA people have never had to tap off. Yet going to Melbourne and Sydney it was not a problem doing so, even with my years of never having to. If the 'locals' using Opal/MYKI can't tap off, having that as standard on their system, then that is a problem with their intelligence, not a problem with the system.
  Aaron Minister for Railways

Location: University of Adelaide SA
Mr Peters, just for you I did some very expensive research, luckily, being a quality scientist I have made sure that my experiment was repeatable, so you're welcome to give it a go yourself.

Spend 2x $2.70 (to ensure repeatability I did this four times) buying two paper tickets on the concourse. Put BOTH of them in the course 'valid ticket checkers' (because surely they're not 'validators' right?) use ONE to validate on board the train - it will give you what is now surely universally known as the 'justapassenger angry buzz'TM and the red light whilst saying 'already validated', don't be alarmed, you have your 'valid ticket checked, but not validated' ticket if anything goes wrong.

Sit down and enjoy the ride to someplace, wait a MINIMUM of two hours and catch the train back with the other ticket that was 'checked for validity' on the platform. Will you get a green light and a 'justapassenger pleasant ping'TM or a red light and a 'justapassenger angry buzz'TM

Let us know how you go, and we will compare your experiment with mine.
  patsstuffnow Junior Train Controller

To the original poster.
Sounds to me as if you are coming from Melbourne by bus.
6 am arrival at Franklin Street.
8.30 departure for the return.

A recent guest of mine used the same bus.
Her day of arrival saw no services to Grange until 7.30. Bus or train
A hike to the railway station or Currie with her large luggage was quite difficult so I collected her.

It is the same as getting to the middle of nowhere to catch the Overland.

How public transport has advanced in 34 years!!!!

Just like the Torrens Road overpass from 40 years ago !!!

It appears that the censors removed my last post for some small reason.

stores around the bus station tend not to open till around 7 am.
If your day of arrival coincides with the market open days I would recommend having breakfast with the market traders.
Also after an overnight bus trip a shower in the bus station ( neat and clean facility) would be a good investment for you and the passengers who will be round you for the day.
I assume you will be concentrating on train travel, but at some point you will need some food.
Some suggestions from me.
Coffee and doughnuts from the ramp at the railway station are good.
Cafe on Bowden station gets good reports for food.
A short walk from the end of the tram line has the Land of Promise hotel. The fried egg palace has good schnitzel deals at lunch time. ( get stuck there you may not need to validate!!!)
The Cumberland hotel at Glanville has good cheap meals and cheap beer.
At Grange I have crumbed garfish and great chips ( I had it tonight for dinner) at Jacks chicken and seafood.
The Dulwich bakery ( also at Grange) has great pies and pasties etc.
The Sheoak deli at Belair was always good for meals and takeaways during my trainspotting days there.
The last time I ate at the pub near Gawler Railway station the steak was good.
Bombay Bicycle club near Ovingham has good specials several week days,
The Seaton Hotel near Seaton Park served me a huge rump steak recently at a good price.

Warradale hotel had good food when I lived there, and could fit in with a look at Oaklands mark 2, before they start on mark 3.

Many years ago the Colonnades Tavern had  great cook your own BBQ.
( I had a beer there with David Hookes one Sunday) looong time ago.








If you want junk food there is a cholesterol alley adjacent to Mitcham.

Have not stopped for food on Seaford lately.
  trainbrain Deputy Commissioner

Hello
I'm planning on heading off to Adelaide in a few days to see what it's like there.
The problem is that i'm having a tough time deciding if a daytrip Metroticket or just buying a Metrocard.
Does the Metrocard have any cap at all? It's not mentioned on their website (or at least I just can't find it) If it doesn't then I'm most likely going to just get a Daytrip ticket.
I'm only going to be there for just a day (14 hours.)
Thank you for any responses.
stooge spark
Does it really matter what you buy, if you are on holidays, cost should not be a problem, you are there to enjoy yourself. If you start penny pinching, you should not go on holidays.

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