17 year old girl successfully lands an aircraft after being informed she lost a wheel on takeoff

 
  woodford Chief Commissioner

This occured a couple of days ago at Beverly Airport, Massachusetts, she was clearly very rattled initially but pulled her self together and did an remarkable job.

The aircraft is a Cherokee warrior.

The accident has NOT stopped her flying, she plans on joining the airforce.

VERY well done.

"If  you can walk away from a landing, it's a good landing. If you use the airplane the next day, it's an outstanding landing."

Chuck Yeager

The above is a VERY WELL KNOWN saying amongst pilots.

https://globalnews.ca/news/4437691/17-year-old-student-pilot-losing-wheel-emergency-landing/

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  woodford Chief Commissioner

A bit more information, the pilot concerned Maggie had 60 hours of flying time , both her parents are pilots (Note 1), This particular flight was her first solo navigation exercise. This does NOT diminish what she did, its well worthwhile to listen to the ATC tapes although  she was clearly very frightened, her radio procedure was perfect and she obviously remembered the first rule in any pilots emergency, whatever happens keep the aircraft flying.

Note 1: I do not know how the licence system works in the USA, in Australia, one first trains for a restricted pilots licence and then one does ones navigation training and gets ones licence endorsed for navigation.
Minimum training hours for ones restricted licence is (was any way in the late 1960's) 40 hours (20 dual, 20 solo). It took me 55 hours, (this is a typical time) to get my restricted licence. Navigation training is a further 6 flights taking around another 15 hours or so. Maggie's training would appear to be progressing in a typical fashion.

woodford
  Valvegear The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Norda Fittazroy
"If  you can walk away from a landing, it's a good landing. If you use the airplane the next day, it's an outstanding landing."
"woodford"
You just can't argue with that!
  RustyRick Chief Commissioner

Location: South West Vic
You can train for emergencies until the cows come home, but until you are facing a real one you don't know how you'll react. Maggie did an exceptional job.

Rick
  woodford Chief Commissioner

You can train for emergencies until the cows come home, but until you are facing a real one you don't know how you'll react. Maggie did an exceptional job.

Rick
RustyRick
That is correct and of course one cannot cater for everything that can go wrong, but pilots are extensively trained for the most usual failures they will encounter, for light aircraft pilots in Australia (when I learned to fly anyway) this includes engine failure and loss of visual reference to the ground (a VERY serious problem that does not at first glance seem like it).
The instructor I had went well beyond that particularly on the correct "mind set" to one: avoid failures and two: how to handle a random failure. This extra training help me NO END when I had two separate undercarraige lowering problems (Note 1).

Note 1: In both cases I managed to solve the issue without having to declare an emergency.

All aircraft extensively use carefull worked out check lists, for EVERTHING one needs the aircraft to do. These checklist have been based on past experience on accident causes. A current example of a checklist update was after the accident that killed the golfer Payne Stewart. All business jets checklists for a cabin air pressure alarm were checked to make sure the first item was "put on oxygen masks". In the Lear jets at the time of the accident this command was 3rd on the list and by the time the monitoring pilot got to the third step the air pressure in the cabin had drop enough to scramble the pilots thinking.

Airline pilots spend extensive time in simulators on a regular basis constantly practicing various types of failures.

As you say Maggie did an excellent job and there would not be a pilot in the world that does not think this.

woodford
  BrentonGolding Chief Commissioner

Location: Maldon Junction
Note 1: I do not know how the licence system works in the USA, in Australia, one first trains for a restricted pilots licence and then one does ones navigation training and gets ones licence endorsed for navigation.
Minimum training hours for ones restricted licence is (was any way in the late 1960's) 40 hours (20 dual, 20 solo). It took me 55 hours, (this is a typical time) to get my restricted licence. Navigation training is a further 6 flights taking around another 15 hours or so. Maggie's training would appear to be progressing in a typical fashion.

woodford
woodford
Trains, Planes and Moteo-sickles! Is there anything that burns crude oil derivatives that you are not into Woodford?

Love it!

BG
  gordon_s1942 Chief Commissioner

Location: Central Tablelands of NSW

All aircraft extensively use carefull worked out check lists, for EVERTHING one needs the aircraft to do. These checklist have been based on past experience on accident causes. A current example of a checklist update was after the accident that killed the golfer Payne Stewart. All business jets checklists for a cabin air pressure alarm were checked to make sure the first item was "put on oxygen masks". In the Lear jets at the time of the accident this command was 3rd on the list and by the time the monitoring pilot got to the third step the air pressure in the cabin had drop enough to scramble the pilots thinking.
woodford
You would have thought that checking and setting oxygen supplies would have be done long before the Aircraft taxi'd onto the runway.  Having seen a few of those shows dealing with Aircraft 'disasters', either skipping sections  or not doing the check list has generally had fatal results.

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