6029 - Lithgow weekend

 
  Bevan Wall Deputy Commissioner

Here are some scenes of 6029 working to Rylstone today.
Enjoy,
BW


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9sVYXgYakjw

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  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Thanks BW for posting.
Another great effort.

As an aside, the antics of some people on platforms in standing so close to the platform edge scares me. I don't imagine that it does much for the engine crews either.

EDit: Forgot to add that there seem a few knocks in 6029.
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
Looks like a great run, and well recorded by BW with the customary artistry.  Thanks to everyone concerned.
  michaelgm Chief Commissioner

Thanks, Bevan for posting.
Probably been a long time since that amount of people were at Ben Bullen station
And agree with YM, lots of "Valvegear or motion knocking, my old man noticed this when the garret west for the Mt Victoria 150?
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
And agree with YM, lots of "Valvegear or motion knocking, my old man noticed this when the garret west for the Mt Victoria 150?
michaelgm
As a matter of interest, I remember reading somewhere years ago, that Baldwins were famous ( or infamous) for what the writer described as the "typical Baldwin valve gear knock".
And; before anyone jumps on me, yes, I know that the 60's were not Baldwins.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
And agree with YM, lots of "Valvegear or motion knocking, my old man noticed this when the garret west for the Mt Victoria 150?
As a matter of interest, I remember reading somewhere years ago, that Baldwins were famous ( or infamous) for what the writer described as the "typical Baldwin valve gear knock".
And; before anyone jumps on me, yes, I know that the 60's were not Baldwins.
Valvegear
I have seen it written (don't ask me where) that the 60 class were roller bearing throughout but it seems that this is, perhaps, only axleboxes and big ends (?) which might account for the knocking which is, nevertheless, a matter of concern?
  Carnot Chief Commissioner

All VR K-class locos "klunk". Maybe the 60s are similar?
  nswtrains Chief Commissioner

Thanks BW for posting.
Another great effort.

As an aside, the antics of some people on platforms in standing so close to the platform edge scares me. I don't imagine that it does much for the engine crews either.

EDit: Forgot to add that there seem a few knocks in 6029.
YM-Mundrabilla
Not at speed.
  michaelgm Chief Commissioner

Rear engine unit, fire mans side.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Thanks BW for posting.
Another great effort.

As an aside, the antics of some people on platforms in standing so close to the platform edge scares me. I don't imagine that it does much for the engine crews either.

EDit: Forgot to add that there seem a few knocks in 6029.
Not at speed.
nswtrains
Knocks may well vary between powering and drifting but to me noise in machinery means slop somewhere and slop means wear which means damage and ultimately self destruction.
  Bevan Wall Deputy Commissioner

Here are some scenes from today's run to Bathurst. Thanks to the crew for putting on the show at the pre-arranged spot!
Enjoy,
BW


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTGcBwVE94s
  a6et Minister for Railways

And agree with YM, lots of "Valvegear or motion knocking, my old man noticed this when the garret west for the Mt Victoria 150?
As a matter of interest, I remember reading somewhere years ago, that Baldwins were famous ( or infamous) for what the writer described as the "typical Baldwin valve gear knock".
And; before anyone jumps on me, yes, I know that the 60's were not Baldwins.
I have seen it written (don't ask me where) that the 60 class were roller bearing throughout but it seems that this is, perhaps, only axleboxes and big ends (?) which might account for the knocking which is, nevertheless, a matter of concern?
YM-Mundrabilla
Thing is that all of what were oiled on the side rods of steam loco's were actually greased with special grease guns that were part of large grease tins that were on trolley's to move along the sides of the engines, prior to their next job. each time they came into a depot for servicing. Its one thing for the wheel bearings to be of the RB type, but the rods were not.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
And agree with YM, lots of "Valvegear or motion knocking, my old man noticed this when the garret west for the Mt Victoria 150?
As a matter of interest, I remember reading somewhere years ago, that Baldwins were famous ( or infamous) for what the writer described as the "typical Baldwin valve gear knock".
And; before anyone jumps on me, yes, I know that the 60's were not Baldwins.
I have seen it written (don't ask me where) that the 60 class were roller bearing throughout but it seems that this is, perhaps, only axleboxes and big ends (?) which might account for the knocking which is, nevertheless, a matter of concern?
Thing is that all of what were oiled on the side rods of steam loco's were actually greased with special grease guns that were part of large grease tins that were on trolley's to move along the sides of the engines, prior to their next job. each time they came into a depot for servicing. Its one thing for the wheel bearings to be of the RB type, but the rods were not.
a6et
Thanks a6et that's what I thought. Is the big end a roller, please, it looks like it might be in some photos?
  Bevan Wall Deputy Commissioner

I had the privilege of riding on the loco on one of the runs from Tarana to Bathurst.
Enjoy,
BW


https://youtu.be/Z0yA46tNF_4
  apw5910 Deputy Commissioner

Location: Location: Location.
Is the big end a roller, please, it looks like it might be in some photos?
YM-Mundrabilla
Yes.
  a6et Minister for Railways

And agree with YM, lots of "Valvegear or motion knocking, my old man noticed this when the garret west for the Mt Victoria 150?
As a matter of interest, I remember reading somewhere years ago, that Baldwins were famous ( or infamous) for what the writer described as the "typical Baldwin valve gear knock".
And; before anyone jumps on me, yes, I know that the 60's were not Baldwins.
I have seen it written (don't ask me where) that the 60 class were roller bearing throughout but it seems that this is, perhaps, only axleboxes and big ends (?) which might account for the knocking which is, nevertheless, a matter of concern?
Thing is that all of what were oiled on the side rods of steam loco's were actually greased with special grease guns that were part of large grease tins that were on trolley's to move along the sides of the engines, prior to their next job. each time they came into a depot for servicing. Its one thing for the wheel bearings to be of the RB type, but the rods were not.
Thanks a6et that's what I thought. Is the big end a roller, please, it looks like it might be in some photos?
YM-Mundrabilla
Cannot answer that as its quite possible that it could have been modified since the regular days, one would think depending on costs that if the big end can be fitted with R/B's then why not the rest of the main con rods as well?????
  a6et Minister for Railways

I had the privilege of riding on the loco on one of the runs from Tarana to Bathurst.
Enjoy,
BW


https://youtu.be/Z0yA46tNF_4
Bevan Wall
Interesting that there is a different regulator on the loco than the originals.
  LowndesJ515 #TeamRog

Location: Not in Victoria
I had the privilege of riding on the loco on one of the runs from Tarana to Bathurst.
Enjoy,
BW
Interesting that there is a different regulator on the loco than the originals.
a6et
Regulator was changed in 2015.
  LowndesJ515 #TeamRog

Location: Not in Victoria
Rear engine unit, fire mans side.
michaelgm
Flats on the wheels, rear unit. Happened in 2015 on two occasions wheels locking up. Gets loud then disappears depending on where you are in the state. Quite noticeable out west.
  4206 Chief Commissioner

Location: Dorrigo yard
Thank you for sharing
  a6et Minister for Railways

I had the privilege of riding on the loco on one of the runs from Tarana to Bathurst.
Enjoy,
BW
Interesting that there is a different regulator on the loco than the originals.
Regulator was changed in 2015.
LowndesJ515
I am amazed at the change from the old regulator as I never found any garratt, and I would on a lot of them from 64 to end of steam where the regulator ever shut on you owing to the spring mounted ball in the top of the regulator arm that sat in recessed shallow holes in the guide. It was the same set up as found on pigs and 38cl, and from memory 57 and 58cl that I saw on the bank at Enfield.

A few pigs (only remember 2) however had similar ratchet regulators but the spring lever was at the front of the regulator, most springs had to be loosened as when the engine slipped, you would end in wheel spin, as the spring was hard to close early, I know one driver who hurt his shoulder trying to close the regulator quickly  with one of them.  The side types on the 59 class were a bit better as the handle and spring clasp to the side of the regulator was not that stiff, bare in mind they slipped a lot easier.

The only problem we may experience with the regulator closing was the result of problems in the multi valve header in the smokebox.

Things change.
  LowndesJ515 #TeamRog

Location: Not in Victoria
And agree with YM, lots of "Valvegear or motion knocking, my old man noticed this when the garret west for the Mt Victoria 150?
As a matter of interest, I remember reading somewhere years ago, that Baldwins were famous ( or infamous) for what the writer described as the "typical Baldwin valve gear knock".
And; before anyone jumps on me, yes, I know that the 60's were not Baldwins.
I have seen it written (don't ask me where) that the 60 class were roller bearing throughout but it seems that this is, perhaps, only axleboxes and big ends (?) which might account for the knocking which is, nevertheless, a matter of concern?
Thing is that all of what were oiled on the side rods of steam loco's were actually greased with special grease guns that were part of large grease tins that were on trolley's to move along the sides of the engines, prior to their next job. each time they came into a depot for servicing. Its one thing for the wheel bearings to be of the RB type, but the rods were not.
Thanks a6et that's what I thought. Is the big end a roller, please, it looks like it might be in some photos?
YM-Mundrabilla
Big Ends are on rollers.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Thanks Lowndes
  Bevan Wall Deputy Commissioner

I have a question regarding the brake pressure gauges used in the 60 class Garratts. I noticed during my cab ride that 6029 is currently fitted with two of the large, six inch diameter old style duplex gauges, one displaying the usual main res and brake pipe pressure, the other being "relabelled" to show brake cylinder and equalising res pressures. I was fortunate in being able to spend some time on Garratts when they were in regular operation, and can only recall seeing one of the large duplex gauges in the cab, showing the normal main res and brake pipe pressures.
I know that when first delivered the 60s were fitted with a large rectangular box that had two dials, one of which I'm assuming showed main res pressure, the other brake pipe pressure. Is that assumption correct? The NSWGR had a policy of standardising fittings such as gauges, consequently the rectangular box type duplex gauge was eventually replaced with the usual large, six inch diameter, round Westinghouse version. Brake pipe flow indicator gauges were fitted later. Here's my main question. Were the 60 class also fitted with a brake cylinder and equalising res pressures duplex gauge, and if so, what type? I'm thinking that if that was the case maybe the smaller, four inch diameter round type was used and that, like with the brake pipe flow indicator gauge, it was mounted in a location where I just never noticed it at the time.
I know that when 6029 was being restored an exhaust steam pressure gauge was fitted, which I don't think the 60s had when in regular service, so perhaps the opportunity to "modernise" the brake pressure information displays and that was when the brake cylinder and equalising res pressures duplex gauge that I noticed on Sunday was installed.
Thanks,
BW
  a6et Minister for Railways

I have a question regarding the brake pressure gauges used in the 60 class Garratts. I noticed during my cab ride that 6029 is currently fitted with two of the large, six inch diameter old style duplex gauges, one displaying the usual main res and brake pipe pressure, the other being "relabelled" to show brake cylinder and equalising res pressures. I was fortunate in being able to spend some time on Garratts when they were in regular operation, and can only recall seeing one of the large duplex gauges in the cab, showing the normal main res and brake pipe pressures.
I know that when first delivered the 60s were fitted with a large rectangular box that had two dials, one of which I'm assuming showed main res pressure, the other brake pipe pressure. Is that assumption correct? The NSWGR had a policy of standardising fittings such as gauges, consequently the rectangular box type duplex gauge was eventually replaced with the usual large, six inch diameter, round Westinghouse version. Brake pipe flow indicator gauges were fitted later. Here's my main question. Were the 60 class also fitted with a brake cylinder and equalising res pressures duplex gauge, and if so, what type? I'm thinking that if that was the case maybe the smaller, four inch diameter round type was used and that, like with the brake pipe flow indicator gauge, it was mounted in a location where I just never noticed it at the time.
I know that when 6029 was being restored an exhaust steam pressure gauge was fitted, which I don't think the 60s had when in regular service, so perhaps the opportunity to "modernise" the brake pressure information displays and that was when the brake cylinder and equalising res pressures duplex gauge that I noticed on Sunday was installed.
Thanks,
BW
Bevan Wall
Bevan

In regular service the garratts in general did not have the gauges as found on 29 now.  By my time when gualified for them in early 1965 I can remember few having the original ones that were enclosed in the single casing. Possibly as they were a bit more labour intensive when needing to change just one of the gauges at a time.

In the main the two round gauges the independent being the smaller, showing the amounts of the pressure applied and again IIRC a steady 100psi as per the main reservoir setting this gauge was to the left of the main larger gauge.  The large round gauge showed the BP usually 70psi and the constant MR pressure of 100psi.  Being an A6et BV, this was designed to allow a minimum reduction of 7psi when the handle was lapped, that also allowed the high pressure controller on the pump to cut in and charge the supplementary reservoir to 125psi to assist in BP and auxiliary recharges.

Some, and not many did get the duplex gauges but it generally only was for a stop gap measure when waiting on the normal gauges as needed.  I personally never saw a duplex on a garratt for the independent brake, that is not to say there were none.

You mention an exhaust steam pressure gauge, are you talking about something along the lines of the 36cl podgers gauge, certainly that was never on them in regular service and unnecessary.  I have noticed an external valve on the outside firemans side of the smokebox below the pumps line and towards the rear, again that is something new.

Having a multi Valve regulator fitting for the regulator the garratts also had a continual blow down pipe located under the firemens side step just to the rear of it, same as the pigs and 38's also I believe on the 57 and 58cl.

PS.

I personally cannot understand why duplex gauges are used instead of the originals, if its a spare parts thing, I would think that the round types which were interchangeable with those on diesels would be much more able to be sourced than the duplex gauges.

On old engines that only had the single BV, especially the #4's descending heavy grades such as the Blue Mountains, Illawarra Mountain, and long descending grades of 1:40 or steeper, the regulations provided for the driver to increase the BP pressure, and on those old BV's the handle was put in full release making the BP pressure 100psi.  It meant as you got nearer the bottom of the grade, you had to slowly bring the BP pressure back to its normal setting of 70psi, this was done by bringing the train to a stand 3 times and adjusting the slide valve feed valve down 10psi at a time. In a sense it was the same with diesels on those grades but it was also different as far as how much air adjustment was made as it usually meant the BP was only set at around 85 rather than the 100psi of the MR.

I hope this helps

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