Boeing 747 turns 50

 
  Carnot Chief Commissioner

I got to fly in quite a few different intercontinental airliners over the years. My perception of each:

Boeing 747 - fast, seating a bit cramped, average noise levels.
Boeing 777 - reasonably fast, very noisy in most of the cabin.
Airbus 330 - slow, but quieter than B777.
Airbus 340 - slow, lumbering takeoff and glacial climb (especially -300 version), quieter than A330.
MD-11 - reasonably fast, very quiet, comfy. My favorite. Perhaps Thai airlines had better insulation?

Sadly I never travelled in a Tristar or the newer Airbus planes or Boeing 787.

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  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
I got to fly in quite a few different intercontinental airliners over the years. My perception of each:

Boeing 747 - fast, seating a bit cramped, average noise levels.
Boeing 777 - reasonably fast, very noisy in most of the cabin.
Airbus 330 - slow, but quieter than B777.
Airbus 340 - slow, lumbering takeoff and glacial climb (especially -300 version), quieter than A330.
MD-11 - reasonably fast, very quiet, comfy. My favorite. Perhaps Thai airlines had better insulation?

Sadly I never travelled in a Tristar or the newer Airbus planes or Boeing 787.
Carnot
I pretty much agree Carnot.

747 Isn't everything cramped to a greater or lesser degree? Otherwise OK. Even flew on that ghastly red aboriginal thing painted with crocodiles and whatever. Thankfully it was dark and didn't see the outside at Heathrow only when we arrived at Tullamarine.
777 definitely noisier than 747 - and just about everything else.
A340 OK but appears 'poky' after 747 or 777.
Never travelled on an MD11 only on DC10 and loved it.
Lockheed Electra beautiful - across the Tasman anyway.
Fokker 70 and 100 plus Boeing 717 very comfortable (2+3 seats). I think that some Australian airlines are now the major users of these frames and still buying available secondhand ones when they can.
Looking forward to an A350.

Adding up the miles a toss up between A340 and 777 as to the most miles flown on a type.

I miss the individual air vents even if only to direct them onto the head's of passengers in front who put their seats back too far. Twisted Evil
  Carnot Chief Commissioner

I got to fly in quite a few different intercontinental airliners over the years. My perception of each:

Boeing 747 - fast, seating a bit cramped, average noise levels.
Boeing 777 - reasonably fast, very noisy in most of the cabin.
Airbus 330 - slow, but quieter than B777.
Airbus 340 - slow, lumbering takeoff and glacial climb (especially -300 version), quieter than A330.
MD-11 - reasonably fast, very quiet, comfy. My favorite. Perhaps Thai airlines had better insulation?

Sadly I never travelled in a Tristar or the newer Airbus planes or Boeing 787.
I pretty much agree Carnot.

747 Isn't everything cramped to a greater or lesser degree? Otherwise OK. Even flew on that ghastly red aboriginal thing painted with crocodiles and whatever. Thankfully it was dark and didn't see the outside at Heathrow only when we arrived at Tullamarine.
777 definitely noisier than 747 - and just about everything else.
A340 OK but appears 'poky' after 747 or 777.
Never travelled on an MD11 only on DC10 and loved it.
Lockheed Electra beautiful - across the Tasman anyway.
Fokker 70 and 100 plus Boeing 717 very comfortable (2+3 seats). I think that some Australian airlines are now the major users of these frames and still buying available secondhand ones when they can.
Looking forward to an A350.

Adding up the miles a toss up between A340 and 777 as to the most miles flown on a type.

I miss the individual air vents even if only to direct them onto the head's of passengers in front who put their seats back too far. Twisted Evil
YM-Mundrabilla
Alliance Airlines, Virgin Regional, and Qantaslink have by far the biggest fleets of Fokker 70 & 100 jets in the world.  And more 2nd hand ones are on order.  Qantaslink also has 20 Boeing 717 aircraft in operation.  Very popular as FIFO planes.
  mikesyd Chief Commissioner

Location: Lurking
My first flight on a 747 was way back in 1974 - from Nadi to Sydney on the first of the 747's that Qantas owned. That was in First Class even as the fare was a mere $50 more than Economy. In those days the upstairs area was a lounge, and I even got a look inside the cockpit.

Its been almost 2 years since my last flight on one, a China Airlines 744 from Taipei to Fukuoka.

Until a year or two ago, a derelict Qantas 747-338 was sitting out beside a hangar at Avalon and could be seen from the Freeway when passing - apparently it went down there about 10 years ago for an overhaul which didn't proceed, and was been parked outside without engines (and no doubt stripped of other vital bits as well) ever since. The paint is faded, but it was VH-EBU - the one that was painted in the Blue "Nalanji Dreaming" scheme. It seems that Avalon Airport have it inside a hangar now undergoing a cosmetic restoration.

https://www.avalonairport.com.au/airport/blog/general/the-disappearance-of-the-blue-jumbo

There are of course two other static exhibits of Qantas 747's too - the one at Longreach and the more recent one at Albion Park.
  neillfarmer Chief Train Controller

I have had some interesting 747 flights. One on an early South African Airlines 747 from London to Johannesburg in 1972. I think there were only about 50 passengers and because of the politics at the time we flew over the ocean all the way, took around 24 hours with a refuel on some Atlantic Island. I also flew Sydney to London on Qantas. At Bahrain Abdul drove the stairs into the wing leading edge putting a dent into it about the size of a football. They bogged it up and put tape over it and we flew on after an hours wait for it to set. Best seat on any aircraft was Qantas business class on the top deck. Sad to see them fade away, great plane.
Neill Farmer
  mikesyd Chief Commissioner

Location: Lurking
I have had some interesting 747 flights. One on an early South African Airlines 747 from London to Johannesburg in 1972. I think there were only about 50 passengers and because of the politics at the time we flew over the ocean all the way, took around 24 hours with a refuel on some Atlantic Island.
neillfarmer
That was the main reason that SAA later bought the 747SP - to get them more range. The Atlantic Island was Cape Verde (then Portuguese, Independent from 1975) and it was used as a refuelling stop by SAA from the mid 1960's to the mid 1980's, and to a much lesser extent in later years.

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