What is this piece of infrastructure equipment called?

 
  FreyaTheGoddess Beginner

Does anyone know what the metal box with the white lever on it is called? I've seen them throughout the Victoria network and from observing them operating they appear to be some sort of treadle, rail circuit detector or an axel counter, however ive seen them directly adjacent to or closeby to Frauscher and Thales axle counters (like the Fraucher AXC seen in the picture) which leads me to believe that they're not axle counters.

Does anyone know the name and/or manufacturer of these and what purpose they serve?

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  max_thum Station Master

Location: Melbourne, Victoria
Trip-arm for the Trip-Cock on Metro Trains.

Trip-arm normally rises when the signal is indicating a danger aspect and if in contact of the trip-cock on the train passing the trip-arm, it will cause the train to stop in an emergency braking setting.

It's a safety measure.
  Lockie91 Train Controller

That is a train stop.

A tripcock is located on the front of all leading bogies. If a driver passes a red signal the raised arm of the train stop will hit the tripcock and apply the breaks. You’ll find them mainly in the inner core. The yellow pod behind it is part of the track detection equipment.
  FreyaTheGoddess Beginner

Trip-arm for the Trip-Cock on Metro Trains.

Trip-arm normally rises when the signal is indicating a danger aspect and if in contact of the trip-cock on the train passing the trip-arm, it will cause the train to stop in an emergency braking setting.

It's a safety measure.
max_thum

So which trains have tripcocks? I would be guessing the Comengs but what about the Siemens and Xtrapolis trains? I know that we also have TPWS grids which do the same thing but electromagnetically (for compatible trains)

  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
If a driver passes a red signal the raised arm of the train stop will hit the tripcock and apply the breaks.
"Lockie91"
I'd prefer to have brakes rather than breaks; it's much safer.
  FreyaTheGoddess Beginner

That is a train stop.

A tripcock is located on the front of all leading bogies. If a driver passes a red signal the raised arm of the train stop will hit the tripcock and apply the breaks. You’ll find them mainly in the inner core. The yellow pod behind it is part of the track detection equipment.
Lockie91

Yeah the yellow pod is the overlay for the Frauscher Axle Counter. The actual axle counter is the small white module attached to the rail

  max_thum Station Master

Location: Melbourne, Victoria

So which trains have tripcocks? I would be guessing the Comengs but what about the Siemens and Xtrapolis trains? I know that we also have TPWS grids which do the same thing but electromagnetically (for compatible trains)

FreyaTheGoddess
Trip-Cock: Comeng (EDI,Alstom), Xtrapolis, Siemens and HCMT.
also included are Harris, Taits, Swing Doors, Hitachis

TPWS: Sprinters, VLocity, N Class and A Class for VLine.
  ARodH Chief Train Controller

Location: East Oakleigh, Vic
I don't know if it's been fixed, but for a long time the down trip-cock at Huntingdale station was in an operating state yet was in a position/orientation where it could not interface with a train if it needed to.
  Valvegear Dr Beeching

Location: Norda Fittazroy
I don't know if it's been fixed, but for a long time the down trip-cock at Huntingdale station was in an operating state yet was in a position/orientation where it could not interface with a train if it needed to.
"ARodH"
Now you've done it! You'd better hope nobody in authority reads this or poor Metro might actually have to do some maintenance.
  ARodH Chief Train Controller

Location: East Oakleigh, Vic
The last time I looked at it was....2016, but I first noticed that it wasn't beside the track where it should be in 2008.
  historian Deputy Commissioner

As others have said, it's a train stop. If an EMU passes the train stop with the arm in the raised position an arm on the leading vehicle will strike the stop, rotate, and release the air from the brake pipe. Apart from applying the brakes, this will open the motor circuit. The train will consequently rapidly come to a stand. This technology has been standard on Victorian EMUs since shortly after electrification.

You will find one of these at every three position running signal in the electrified area, and occasionally at isolated locations approaching a converging set of points.

This specific train stop is a Style JAH. The original design was developed around 1973 by Westinghouse, and it is now produced by Siemens.
  gmanning1 Locomotive Driver

Location: Sydney
I've noticed at Ashfield station (in Sydney) on platform 4 (turn-back platform?) they have three of these in a row.

Why would they need 3? With some Googling, I get this:

This is a type of train stop attached to a signal that can display a low speed indication. The trip arm still works normally while the signal is at stop. However, when the signal is changed to low speed, the arm will stay up. As the train approaches the signal, sensors will measure the speed of the train, by counting how long it takes for the train to pass a certain section. If the speed is under 25km/h, the trip arm will drop and the train will be able to pass. However, if the train is over 25km/h, the train will strike the trip and be brought to a halt.
Low speed train stop


These trips are only found in major stations that have trains very close to each other. They are found along the length of a platform, seemingly not connected to any signal. However, they are connected to the signal at the end of the platform. When the signal at the end of the platform is at stop, all the trips will come up and act like a low speed trip. They will force the train to slow down for the red signal. The last trip, closest to the signal, requires a speed of about 4km/h.
Intermediate Trips

https://nswtrains.fandom.com/wiki/Train_Stops

Are these good descriptions?
  jakar Assistant Commissioner

Location: Melbourne
Are these good descriptions?
gmanning1
They're good enough. They're used in that manner to ensure the driver has the train under control at an appropriate speed so as not to SPAD at the signal, or if he does to minimize the distance he will travel past it.

Something to ponder, in Victoria (and probably elsewhere) what situation will the train stop remain raised even though the signal is showing a proceed aspect?
  historian Deputy Commissioner

Something to ponder, in Victoria (and probably elsewhere) what situation will the train stop remain raised even though the signal is showing a proceed aspect?
jakar

End of electrification.

(Actually, to be more precise, no more overhead on the route that is signalled.)
  kitchgp Chief Commissioner

The City Loop has (had) signals with two train stops (maybe three, see below) since it opened in 1981. Originally each platform Departure signal stayed at Stop even though the signal ahead had cleared to Medium Speed Warning* and there was no junction in between. The train stop furthest from the signal retracted after the preceding train cleared the overlap. Obviously I can’t say what happens elsewhere in the tunnels. I haven’t observed Loop operations for years so I can’t say what the current situation is. I’ll provide an update if I get a chance.

* I think the sequence was Stop, Medium Speed Warning, Reduce to Medium Speed and Clear Normal Speed
  kitchgp Chief Commissioner

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