Zambian regulation switches freight from road to rail

 

News article: Zambian regulation switches freight from road to rail

Following the implementation of a Zambian regulation requiring 30% of selected bulk commodities to be transported by rail rather than by road, Delta Energy Zambia has awarded Tanzania-Zambia Railway Authority and Zambia Railways Ltd a contract to transport petroleum from the Port of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania to Ndola in Zambia.

  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Zambia now seems to be able to do what Australia is incapable of doing and that is to better utilise rail over road. 

Is it time the Australia Government introduced a 30% quota for rail use over road for intermodal and other commodities including bulk?  If we do not do this the road network will consist of a conga line of trucks between Melbourne and Sydney and  Melbourne and Adelaide.

Zambian regulation switches freight from road to rail

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  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales
If you want to do that then petroleum should be moved to rail like Zambia has just done.
  BDA Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney
What the Federal and State governments need to do is provide modern rail infrastructure and alignments so that rail has a hope of competing with road .
Trying to be competitive on 1930s alignment is hopeless .
The road freight industry did not provide the interstate road expressways that exist today , the Federal and State governments did . This is where the greatest inequality exists .
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
I completely agree with your comments but there are rail routes available today which do not require a lot of work and which can carry freight which does not need to be there in 5 mins.  What is causing the damage is the road lobby expecting to run heavier and heavier loads on road for which the true cost is NOT taken into account or billed to the transport company.

This is the real problem.

Seriously what is actual time difference for freight between Sydney and Melbourne on rail as compared to road?
  BDA Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney
Put it this way , when I last spoke to truck drivers at Yass Services Centre around 6-7 years ago they said it took around 9 1/2 hours to drive a B Double from Capital to Capital .
At that stage the XPT was doing the trip in about 11 1/2 hours and typically superfreighters were more like 13-14 hours .
A good run to Junee on a Superfreighter used to take 8 1/2 hours out of Sydney , at that stage the truck launched at the same time is about an hour out of Melbourne . The train is just over half way there .
Nowhere on the Hume is the posted speed less than 110 , or 100 for trucks . There are no tight bends at the foot of any grades .
The Hume is a lot more direct than the southern railway line and nowhere is it single lane .

Now do you all understand why the rail operators are starving on 1% of the available land freight between Sydney and Melbourne .
  justapassenger Minister for Railways

Put it this way , when I last spoke to truck drivers at Yass Services Centre around 6-7 years ago they said it took around 9 1/2 hours to drive a B Double from Capital to Capital .
At that stage the XPT was doing the trip in about 11 1/2 hours and typically superfreighters were more like 13-14 hours .
A good run to Junee on a Superfreighter used to take 8 1/2 hours out of Sydney , at that stage the truck launched at the same time is about an hour out of Melbourne . The train is just over half way there .
Nowhere on the Hume is the posted speed less than 110 , or 100 for trucks . There are no tight bends at the foot of any grades .
The Hume is a lot more direct than the southern railway line and nowhere is it single lane .

Now do you all understand why the rail operators are starving on 1% of the available land freight between Sydney and Melbourne .
BDA
And that's only taking into account what happens after the train gets moving and rolls out of its terminal.

For a fair comparison, you also need to consider what would happen if the load going by rail was dispatched from the origin at the same time as the truck. The load doesn't get straight on a train, it leaves the origin on a truck for a trip to a rail depot. There's a fair chance this means the load is actually going further away from its destination in this time rather than making progress! It then spends hours sitting in the depot before the train gets moving.

The whole double handling routine is repeated on the destination end, with a net effect of making it likely that door-to-door time is going to be closer to 24 hours than to overnight.

To fix it, regulatory moves will not be enough as they will simply increase prices for goods and lead to a negligible amount of modal shift.


The model used by the railway needs to change completely. Sydney-Melbourne would be a thriving rail route if it was electrified and double-tracked to allow European-style high frequency rolling highway services carrying trucks at 140 km/h.
  BDA Chief Commissioner

Location: Sydney
No electrification is not the instant answer .
The answer is more direct alignments capable of higher average speeds . By this I don't mean 140 km/h either , 115 is fine if you have alignments capable of doing this over the majority of the lines length . As mentioned above the Hume is good for 100/110 over virtually its entire length .

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