Ad Met goings on -

 
  Aaron Minister for Railways

Location: University of Adelaide SA
For Heath’s benefit, how many SUV’s and soccer mums there with their little kids Don?

You think it’s packed on game days, you should see the place for Dożynki.

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  mawsonboii Locomotive Driver

The Currie Street InfoCentre will permanently close at 5pm, 13 September 2019The Adelaide Metro InfoCentre on Currie Street will permanently close from 5pm Friday 13 September 2019.
Due to plans to redevelop the site, the lease on the Currie Street InfoCentre site cannot be extended.
Customers can continue to access services online or by phone, with a metroCARD agent, or at one of our vending machines.
Alternatively, customers can undertake all transactions at the Adelaide Railway Station Info Centre (500m away on North Terrace).

I'm guessing there are no empty buildings in Rundle Mall or Currie/Grenfell st's where they could open a new information centre.
  nm39 Chief Commissioner

Location: By a road taking pictures
The Currie Street InfoCentre will permanently close at 5pm, 13 September 2019The Adelaide Metro InfoCentre on Currie Street will permanently close from 5pm Friday 13 September 2019.
Due to plans to redevelop the site, the lease on the Currie Street InfoCentre site cannot be extended.
Customers can continue to access services online or by phone, with a metroCARD agent, or at one of our vending machines.
Alternatively, customers can undertake all transactions at the Adelaide Railway Station Info Centre (500m away on North Terrace).

I'm guessing there are no empty buildings in Rundle Mall or Currie/Grenfell st's where they could open a new information centre.
mawsonboii
Obviously this is because the Government wants less FTEs (Full Time Equivalents) on the books. Let's face it a vending machine doesn't cost WAGES. Pay an arm and a leg for a rental machine but don't pay wages.
  Gayspie Assistant Commissioner

Location: Adelaide, SA
Meanwhile in the Hills, i caught a Belair train the other day to look for geo-caches in Eden Hills, and i noticed that all houses and buildings behind Torrens Park railway station have been demolished. Maybe Adelaide Metro is going to finally upgrade that patchwork quilt of a station into something more sustainable for the local area.
  Aaron Minister for Railways

Location: University of Adelaide SA
No, the land there is just for regular sale to whom ever is dumb enough to buy it.
  justapassenger Chief Commissioner

Meanwhile in the Hills, i caught a Belair train the other day to look for geo-caches in Eden Hills, and i noticed that all houses and buildings behind Torrens Park railway station have been demolished. Maybe Adelaide Metro is going to finally upgrade that patchwork quilt of a station into something more sustainable for the local area.
Heath
It's not exactly the Taj Mahal of stations*, but it does seem more than adequate for the low patronage it receives. People get on trains, people get off trains, job done.

No way would such a low usage stop deserve money for acquiring properties to incorporate into the station. That wouldn't even be in the top 100 of most worthwhile public transport projects in Adelaide.

* though it is often just as lively as the interior.
  DJPeters Assistant Commissioner

No, the land there is just for regular sale to whom ever is dumb enough to buy it.
Aaron
Or to nimby's that will buy a property there and then complain about the noise the trains make.
  don_dunstan Minister for Railways

Location: Adelaide proud
No, the land there is just for regular sale to whom ever is dumb enough to buy it.
Or to nimby's that will buy a property there and then complain about the noise the trains make.
DJPeters
"Oh noes, we bought an apartment next to a railway line and now we have to listen to trains. Make the trains stop! We can't be bothered getting double-glazing..."
  Gayspie Assistant Commissioner

Location: Adelaide, SA
Some people are clowns.
  Gayspie Assistant Commissioner

Location: Adelaide, SA
Meanwhile a fight erupted on a train at Kilburn Station on the Gawler line last night due to a young out of control bogan refusing to validate his ticket after being confronted by the PSA who was only doing his job. Two Security men quickly intervened and removed this violent passenger from the rail-car.
  DJPeters Assistant Commissioner

Meanwhile a fight erupted on a train at Kilburn Station on the Gawler line last night due to a young out of control bogan refusing to validate his ticket after being confronted by the PSA who was only doing his job. Two Security men quickly intervened and removed this violent passenger from the rail-car.
Heath
Par for the course on a Gawler train these days at certain times. Why they have to go ape when caught though gets me I have seen one do it at Woodville who got caught in a snap ticket check biltz on the line. No need for it really do the crime then do the time or in this case pay the fine anyway.  Glad to see he was removed though and hopefully he will now get slugged a lot more that if he had bought and validated a ticket again you cannot work them out. Sure the tickets etc are not cheap, but they are cheaper than any 3 figure fine though before you get to the cents.
  ARG706 Chief Commissioner

Location: SA
I always bought a ticket when traveling one stop to school in the early 2000s. Although I'll admit that $5.60 for a single trip is exorbtitant.

I won't go into fares any further, given this is the SA section...
  Halo Chief Train Controller

The two train pillars in the Darlington roadworks now have heads cast on them.

Also, how does a paper ticket get its time and date printed on the back. I've got one here I found. Price on front! If the stripe is on the back when validated, how does the machine know what ticket it is?! Don't make me photograph the stupid thing?
  justapassenger Chief Commissioner

Also, how does a paper ticket get its time and date printed on the back.
Halo
Inside the validators on buses and those built into ticket vending machines, there is a magnetic information read/write head below the slot where the ticket goes in, and a small printer above it.

When you buy a ticket from a vending machine, the vending machine's built-in validator will write the ticket data (ticket type and price, validation date/time, service codes) onto the magnetic strip on the back and the printer will print it on the front.

When you buy a ticket from a bus driver, they will select the appropriate information on their computer and then the validator will write it to the blank ticket (both the magnetic strip on the back and the printing on the front) when you insert it into the validator. If you put the blank ticket in upside down or in reverse, the validator will not be able to write the information to the ticket and it will spit the ticket out with a buzzer noise and a red light.

It used to be the case that you could buy a paper ticket from a retail agent (newsagent, service station etc) which had been 'pre-loaded' with the ticket type/price on both the magnetic strip and printed on the front. The validation date/time would be added when you validated it for the first time on a vehicle or at a station platform gate.

If the stripe is on the back when validated, how does the machine know what ticket it is?!
Halo
The validator reads the information from the magnetic strip on the back, which is essentially a very low capacity floppy disk.

If you insert the ticket the wrong way, the validator will not be able to read the information and will show the red light for an unsuccessful validation attempt.

The printed information on the front (ticket type, valid date/time) is not used by the validator. It is only for the convenience of the passenger, or for an officer to inspect if their handheld ticket/card reading device cannot read the data on the magnetic strip.

Don't make me photograph the stupid thing?
Halo
Wikipedia has some old photos - interestingly they were contributed by Caleb Bond before he shot to fame as the teenaged shining wit with his own Advertiser column.




Both versions of the multitrip and the green seniors ticket were discontinued a few years back.
  Halo Chief Train Controller

Damn. Can't embed photo on the forum.

But I definitely have a ticket here with the price and type on the front, and the time and date incorrectly on the back. If the stripe can't be read when the ticket is inserted back to front, why did it it print the date and time on the back.

I've seen about 5 tickets like this over the years.
  Aaron Minister for Railways

Location: University of Adelaide SA
Because that’s where the print head is located...
  Halo Chief Train Controller

The print head is located on the front where it "normally" prints the ticket info.
  Aaron Minister for Railways

Location: University of Adelaide SA
No, the print head is located wherever is the most convenient location from a design perspective. These are off the shelf product, and the print head alignment with respect to SA ticket design is of little importance to the (I think still) French manufacturer.
  Halo Chief Train Controller

Yup. Print head is at the back. Black stripe head up front. I still have a ticket here with printing on both sides. That was the original question, how?
  justapassenger Chief Commissioner

It's a while since I've used a paper ticket ... is the paper thinner these days? If so, it might be possible for the magnetic head to still read it when inserted upside down.
  Aaron Minister for Railways

Location: University of Adelaide SA
Halo, the print head is located next to the magnetic head.
  mm42 Chief Train Controller

A few recent photos from the Adelaide network.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/184824880@N03/48846794947/in/dateposted-public/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/184824880@N03/48846794962/in/dateposted-public/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/184824880@N03/48846294818/in/dateposted-public/

This was a 3-car electric train. Once the secondary students alighted the tran was no longer overcrowded.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/184824880@N03/48846794592/in/dateposted-public/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/184824880@N03/48846601661/in/dateposted-public/

Note the line of concrete piers part way through pouring, which will hold the rail line extension to the Flinders Medical Centre, and a footbridge. The new station will be to the left of the photo.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/184824880@N03/48846244078/in/dateposted-public/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/184824880@N03/48846651376/in/dateposted-public/

This was a two-car Adelaide-bound train that arrived after 9am, which in the last few stops was very slow to load because of crowding. After electrification these 2-car diesel electrics will gradually be replaced with 3-car electric trains.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/184824880@N03/48846619336/in/dateposted-public/
  trainbrain Chief Commissioner

For the Adelaide system to work properly and what is left of it they need modern six car EMUs to make rail more attractive, this running two car trains is a nonsense and a retrograde.
  mm42 Chief Train Controller

The Adelaide train system only carries 14.5 m passengers per year, so it is defintely not ready for 6-car EMUs. They have made a wise choice of running short trains at high frequency (like Perth) rather than long trains at low frequency (like Brisbane or Melbourne). The system serves 4 main markets
- peak hour commuting to jobs in the CBD (but the CBD is not a strong employment focus in Adelaide)
- secondary students going to school
- passengers on concession fares (on Adelaide's train, bus and tram system only 21m of 75m ticket sales were regular fares, the remainder were various concessions)
- events at the Adelaide Oval

Apart from peak hour Adelaide is easy to drive around, which means its train system has peaky demand. For CBD commuters the system has a high peak frequency of 15 minutes or better on nearly all lines, but outside of the peaks it's only every 30 minutes except for the Seaford Line and major stations on the Gawler Line, where it's a 15 minute interpeak frequency. We can't expect much increase in patronage without an increase in CBD employment.

To their credit the South Australian government has upgraded all the suburban lines (to make up for years of deferred maintenance). The foundations have been rebuilt with new or reworked ballast, and geotextile to keep water out of the track foundation. The trains ride more smoothly than in Melbourne, but not as smoothly as in Tokyo. Most of the stations have also been rebuilt with level boarding, which is a rarity in Melbourne. Their planners also place a higher priority on inter-peak frequency than in Melbourne on their two highest-patronage lines. They are doing what they can in a hostile environment.

https://www.dpti.sa.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0006/501387/DPTI_Annual_Report_2017-2018.pdf
  trainbrain Chief Commissioner

The Adelaide train system only carries 14.5 m passengers per year, so it is defintely not ready for 6-car EMUs. They have made a wise choice of running short trains at high frequency (like Perth) rather than long trains at low frequency (like Brisbane or Melbourne). The system serves 4 main markets
- peak hour commuting to jobs in the CBD (but the CBD is not a strong employment focus in Adelaide)
- secondary students going to school
- passengers on concession fares (on Adelaide's train, bus and tram system only 21m of 75m ticket sales were regular fares, the remainder were various concessions)
- events at the Adelaide Oval

Apart from peak hour Adelaide is easy to drive around, which means its train system has peaky demand. For CBD commuters the system has a high peak frequency of 15 minutes or better on nearly all lines, but outside of the peaks it's only every 30 minutes except for the Seaford Line and major stations on the Gawler Line, where it's a 15 minute interpeak frequency. We can't expect much increase in patronage without an increase in CBD employment.

To their credit the South Australian government has upgraded all the suburban lines (to make up for years of deferred maintenance). The foundations have been rebuilt with new or reworked ballast, and geotextile to keep water out of the track foundation. The trains ride more smoothly than in Melbourne, but not as smoothly as in Tokyo. Most of the stations have also been rebuilt with level boarding, which is a rarity in Melbourne. Their planners also place a higher priority on inter-peak frequency than in Melbourne on their two highest-patronage lines. They are doing what they can in a hostile environment.

https://www.dpti.sa.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0006/501387/DPTI_Annual_Report_2017-2018.pdf
mm42
I am well aware of the limitations of this system, it is basically  a south  to north east  demographric system, I have been to Adelaide several times and running two car choochoos is laughable, minimum, of three car trains is required thus encouraging more use. I acknowledge that Adelaide is eay to drive around  but the Adelaide Metro is under utilised and needs better management.

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