Rollingstock demand queries

 
Topic moved from Queensland by dthead on 03 Oct 2019 21:49
  dharlan1 Beginner

Hi there,

I'm doing some market research on the demand for rail freight going forward. Would love to get some insight on:
- Which companies generally own their own rolling stock?- How much freight is taken off the road infrastructure (i.e. trucks) when a new rail track is constructed; and
- How does this affect the demand for carriages/rolling stock?

Any insights would be fantastic  for someone who can shed some light on this.

Thanks

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  bingley hall Minister for Railways

Location: Last train to Skaville
Hi there,

I'm doing some market research on the demand for rail freight going forward. Would love to get some insight on:
- Which companies generally own their own rolling stock?- How much freight is taken off the road infrastructure (i.e. trucks) when a new rail track is constructed; and
- How does this affect the demand for carriages/rolling stock?

Any insights would be fantastic  for someone who can shed some light on this.

Thanks
dharlan1

No hard and fast rules.

Bigger freight operators will tend to own a greater percentage of their rolling stock than the smaller companies do.

Some traffic lows, the customer will own the rolling stock so they can swap operators of they choose.

The only place that any serious new track is being built (for freight trains) is the Inland Rail route - there is no equation that exists to suggest how many trucks are replaced per kilometre of track - it would always depend on the length of a given track and the tonnages to be carried and whether it is on road in the first place.

The general economy and new traffic flows is what will determine the demand more than anything else. Of course the age of existing rolling stock will also be a factor.

The Australasian Railway Association gives out a figure for how many trucks a train of a certain length will replace.
  Sulla1 Chief Commissioner

The only general freight railway opened in Australia this century is the Alice Springs to Darwin railway. The line opened in 2004 and by 2009 had captured ninety percent of the intermodal traffic from the parallel Stuart Highway. Rail rates were ten to twenty percent lower than road with similar transit times.

However the Darwin corridor is unique in its length, alignment and population demand, so it's unlikely any future freight corridor will achieve the same sort of market saturation.

Aurizon and PN are the two largest rail freight companies in Australia, they largely use their own rollingstock or rollingstock owned by customers.

In Queensland, the largest tonnage freight market on the east coast of Australia - with more than 225-million tonnes on rail per annum - there are no parties providing general rollingstock for lease, with all equipment owned by operators or by customers (with the exception of the GATX-owned acid tankers leased by Incitec Pivot).
  dharlan1 Beginner

Hi there,

I'm doing some market research on the demand for rail freight going forward. Would love to get some insight on:
- Which companies generally own their own rolling stock?- How much freight is taken off the road infrastructure (i.e. trucks) when a new rail track is constructed; and
- How does this affect the demand for carriages/rolling stock?

Any insights would be fantastic  for someone who can shed some light on this.

Thanks

No hard and fast rules.

Bigger freight operators will tend to own a greater percentage of their rolling stock than the smaller companies do.

Some traffic lows, the customer will own the rolling stock so they can swap operators of they choose.

The only place that any serious new track is being built (for freight trains) is the Inland Rail route - there is no equation that exists to suggest how many trucks are replaced per kilometre of track - it would always depend on the length of a given track and the tonnages to be carried and whether it is on road in the first place.

The general economy and new traffic flows is what will determine the demand more than anything else. Of course the age of existing rolling stock will also be a factor.

The Australasian Railway Association gives out a figure for how many trucks a train of a certain length will replace.
bingley hall
Thanks for your response! Understand that there are no hard and fast rules but that is useful information.
  petan Chief Commissioner

Location: Waiting to see a zebra using a zebra crossing!
dharlan1
In your other threads with this question you mentioned some sort of bait / prize. I count some contenders for this. (only joking so no need to give out prizes)
  dthead Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
the original post  was edited and moved here, with all other duplicate posts deleted. Freely given info is best, but remember nothing said here could be used in any official sense - you cannot quote or ID the source of information factually.

As to a "reward" , not gunna happen HERE. Wink

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