Aussie Prime Ministers in history

 
  michaelgm Chief Commissioner

Yes, I've also read the book about that too (Niki Savva's Road to Ruin) and it seems pretty obvious that there was some kind of (sexual?) relationship between the two of them and that she wasn't allowing ministers to have contact with him and/or make decisions without their approval.
As you guessed, I have the book, and when I read it, I also concluded that there was some form of chemistry there. I wondered whether he was a closet masochist, and was enjoying the female domination.
Valvegear
Yep, Margy was home doing the ironing and Tony was serving Mistress Peta!

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  don_dunstan The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Adelaide proud
The other thing that I forgot about Abbott and Hockey was the stupid, ill-conceived idea to make people wait 6 months before they could get the dole if they were under thirty - discussed here in a 2015 article from Fairfax:

The Abbott government is backing down on its controversial plan to make younger people seeking the dole wait up to six months before receiving welfare in a radical departure from its tough "lifter or leaner" language seen in last year's budget.

Instead of asking people under 30 to wait six months before receiving the dole, the Coalition will now seek to extend the existing one-week waiting period to four weeks for people aged under 25.

That was purely about punishing the young and it would have tipped a lot of people into criminality in order to survive. If the goal was to make people engage in education then surely the answer would be to extend the 'mutual obligation' scheme to make new applicants come up with their own plan to get a job?
  nswtrains Chief Commissioner

Yes, I've also read the book about that too (Niki Savva's Road to Ruin) and it seems pretty obvious that there was some kind of (sexual?) relationship between the two of them and that she wasn't allowing ministers to have contact with him and/or make decisions without their approval.
As you guessed, I have the book, and when I read it, I also concluded that there was some form of chemistry there. I wondered whether he was a closet masochist, and was enjoying the female domination.
Valvegear
All dyed in the wool Catholics I have known appeared to have masochistic tendencies. Seems to go with the territory. The rest are just delusional.
  DirtyBallast Chief Commissioner

Location: I was here first. You're only visiting.
Trivia moment -

I am currently reading Hugh Riminton's autobiography Minefields. Among his many assignments, he covered Mandela's inauguration back in 1994. Apparently, Australia was allowed to send two political representatives. As Prime Minister, Keating could have chosen to go, but he decided not to big note himself and instead sent the two people who were instrumental in supporting the anti-apartheid movement previously - Fraser and Hawke.  

Riminton met both before the big event. Hawke was typically boorish but then put on his Statesman face when it mattered. Fraser was much more humane and actually invited Riminton to tag along to Rwanda to cover the unfolding emergency there straight after. Years later they shared a memory from there, which was deeply moving for both.
  don_dunstan The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Adelaide proud
Fraser's championing of Mugabe as a legitimate alternative to the Smith government in Zimbabwe led directly to that country becoming a failed state. South Africa itself is now becoming a failed state, they can't even keep the power and water supply on any longer its become so corrupt.

These people rushed to make sure that the white regimes were kicked out and did nothing whatsoever to ensure that their replacements were any better - in fact they turned out to be much worse.
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Norda Fittazroy
Exit; Tony Abbott.  Enter; Malcolm Turnbull.

As we saw previously, the perceived excesses of Abbott played into Turnbull’s hand, as a different style of Leader was wanted. It could be asked whether anyone in the party really knew exactly what new style was wanted, but the main consideration would seem to be “moderate”, and our second post-war Malcolm took the reins.

Turnbull’s working life began as a barrister, and he became General Counsel for Australian Consolidated Press Holdings Group from 1983 to 1985.  He was heavily involved in the defence of Kerry Packer against allegations that he, Packer, was the so called “Goanna” of dubious reputation at the Costigan Royal Commission. He also instituted defamation proceedings against the counsel assisting the Commission, Douglas Meagher QC, and this was thrown out of court with some withering comments from the bench. It made Turnbull many enemies within the NSW Bar Association, and he quit that association.

In 1987 he started his career in merchant banking. He had already made unsuccessful attempts at Liberal preselection for the seats of Wentworth, Lowe and Mosman, and allowed his party membership to lapse in 1986, before rejoining in 2000. In 1993, Turnbull was appointed by Prime Minister Paul Keating as Chair of the Republic Advisory Committee, charged with exploring ways of moving Australia to a republican form of government by replacing the Queen of Australia with an elected Australian head of state. Later that year, Turnbull became Chair of the Australian Republican Movement, a position he would hold until 2000. He was an elected delegate at the 1998 Australian Constitutional Convention in Canberra.
Turnbull was an active campaigner in the unsuccessful 1999 referendum to establish an Australian republic, serving as Chair of the Yes Committee. When the referendum failed, he fell out with John Howard who, he said, had manipulated the question put to the public so that it didn’t ask whether people actually wanted a republic at all. Turnbull retired from the Australian Republican Movement in 2000.
In 2003, Turnbull again tried for the seat of Wentworth which he achieved after a bitter preselection campaign, and the expenditure of over $600,000 at the 2004 election. The swing was such that the seat became classified as marginal for the first time since 1993. From then onwards, Turnbull made the seat his own and in November 2007, after Howard became only the second sitting Prime Minister to lose his seat, Turnbull lost a leadership ballot by three votes to Brendan Nelson, who immediately named Turnbull as Shadow Treasurer. Months of poor polling went by until Turnbull ousted Nelson and became Opposition Leader. This was to be  the start of some displeasure at Turnbull’s alleged failure to consult before speaking out.  There was a variety of issues, including the infamous Godwin Grech/OzCar fiasco, which embarrassed him and weakened his position to the point where Abbott challenged and won.
Fast forward to 2015 when Turnbull became Prime Minister. The inevitable Cabinet reshuffle took place in he increased the number of female Cabinet Ministers from two to five and appointed Marise Payne as Australia's first female Minister for Defence. The number of Cabinet Ministers rose from 19 to 21. Turnbull said that there would be no change to his key policy differences with Abbott until after an election. These issues included climate change, republicanism and same-sex marriage. Turnbull stated that he would not lead a government that did not take climate change seriously. At the subsequent election in July 2016, the Coalition lost 14 seats and held power by just one seat. There was a 10.9% swing against Turnbull in Wentworth. One of his pet projects did finally come to pass with the adoption of same sex marriage; a topic which caused bitter divisions within the Coalition. A temporary hiccup saw Turnbull lose his majority in the House over eligibility of those with dual citizenship. Barnaby Joyce and Fiona Nash were ruled ineligible by the High Court, and John Alexander resigned. Subsequent by-elections restored the status quo.
By now, disquiet was bubbling away and, in August 2018, culminated in a leadership challenge by Peter Dutton which Turnbull won by 48 votes to 35. This spill highlighted ideological tensions within the Liberal Party, between the moderate wing led by Turnbull and the conservative wing represented by Dutton and Tony Abbott. From 21 to 23 August, tensions mounted and Dutton announced that he would seek a second spill.

Turnbull replied that if Dutton was found eligible to serve in Parliament he would call such a meeting, vacate the leadership (regarding the petition as a vote of no confidence) and not stand in the subsequent leadership election. Dutton was found to be "not ineligible" to serve, and the party meeting was then called. The leadership was spilled, and Scott Morrison was  elected as Turnbull's successor by 45 votes over Dutton with 40. In his final press conference as Prime Minister, Turnbull denounced Dutton and Abbott as "wreckers".
On 27 August Turnbull announced that he would resign from Parliament over the coming days. On 31 August 2018 he tendered a formal notice of resignation to the Speaker of the House of Representatives.

As is well known, he then concentrated on his book, “A Bigger Picture”, which was received with lukewarm feelings at best. One writer said that the book told of the love affair between Malcolm Turnbull and Malcolm Turnbull, which was one of the great parliamentary love stories of all time.
  DCook Chief Train Controller

Location: The standard state
A great synopsis there Valvegear, Malcolm Turnbull had many good ideas but also had many bad ideas
He was better than Tony Abbot but no better than any other 2000s prime minister

As we get towards the present day I think it would be a good idea to go in reverse and summarise all the PMs that came before Menzies in the current format (ie, next post Chifley, after that Curtin, Fadden etc)
  don_dunstan The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Adelaide proud
I agree, great synopsis of Turnbull's leadership there Valvegear - I'll get around to dissecting it at some stage soon when I'm not at work. Doing a COVID19 related thing at present and its keeping me extremely busy which is good (I guess).
  don_dunstan The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Adelaide proud
A great synopsis there Valvegear, Malcolm Turnbull had many good ideas but also had many bad ideas
He was better than Tony Abbot but no better than any other 2000s prime minister

As we get towards the present day I think it would be a good idea to go in reverse and summarise all the PMs that came before Menzies in the current format (ie, next post Chifley, after that Curtin, Fadden etc)
DCook
We could also examine Billy Hughes, Stanley Melbourne Bruce and Joe Lyons.
  don_dunstan The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Adelaide proud
Ex-PM also-ran Kevin Rudd proves what a suck-up he is to the Chinese Communist Party (as if we needed proof) - News.com.au;

Kevin Rudd has warned that the risk of a “hot war” between China and the United States that includes actual armed conflict is now “especially high” for the first time since the 1950s. As the chaotic Trump administration counts down to an election, the former prime minister has outlined his fears that the “sabre rattling from both Beijing and Washington has become strident, uncompromising, and seemingly unending.”

In a journal article forForeign Affairs, Mr Rudd writes there are now real fears about what happens next.

“The question now being asked, quietly but nervously, in capitals around the world is, where will this end?,’’ Mr Rudd writes.

“The once unthinkable outcome — actual armed conflict between the United States and China — now appears possible for the first time since the end of the Korean War. In other words, we are confronting the prospect of not just a new Cold War, but a hot one as well.”...

...Mr Rudd, 60, has enrolled as a PhD student at Oxford University and is working on a doctorate focused on Chinese president Xi Jinping.

So dear old Kevvie is writing a PhD thesis love-letter to Uncle Xi saying what a naughty man Trump is for challenging the Chinese? What a shock. And he has zero evidence for his idea apart from the 'freedom of navigation' exercises being conducted by the USA in international waters in the South China Sea - something that they have every right to do.
  apw5910 Deputy Commissioner

Location: Location: Location.
A great synopsis there Valvegear, Malcolm Turnbull had many good ideas but also had many bad ideas
He was better than Tony Abbot but no better than any other 2000s prime minister

As we get towards the present day I think it would be a good idea to go in reverse and summarise all the PMs that came before Menzies in the current format (ie, next post Chifley, after that Curtin, Fadden etc)
We could also examine Billy Hughes, Stanley Melbourne Bruce and Joe Lyons.
don_dunstan
Sounds like suburbs in Canberra. Hope it's not as boring.
  DirtyBallast Chief Commissioner

Location: I was here first. You're only visiting.
A great synopsis there Valvegear, Malcolm Turnbull had many good ideas but also had many bad ideas
He was better than Tony Abbot but no better than any other 2000s prime minister

As we get towards the present day I think it would be a good idea to go in reverse and summarise all the PMs that came before Menzies in the current format (ie, next post Chifley, after that Curtin, Fadden etc)
We could also examine Billy Hughes, Stanley Melbourne Bruce and Joe Lyons.
don_dunstan
How about Curtin, Fadden and Chifley - all at the same time?

More trivia - these three, with a companion named O'Sullivan (who was never a Prime minister so probably did most of the driving), famously rocked up to the iconic Niagara Cafe in Gundagai in the middle of the night one Saturday in 1942 and demanded to be fed. It was wartime and rationing was in place, so Jack Castrisson, the proprieter at the time, was not letting the opportunity pass. After complaining that rationing was hurting his business, his tea ration was suddenly increased from 28 lb per month to 100 lb per month! Canny!

Nowadays, could three Prime ministers (past, present and future and not all from the same party) share a booth chowing down steak and eggs and drink from the same teapot, them jump back in the same car to continue their journey? Not bloody likely!

Source: Bypass, the story of a road by Michael McGirr.
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Norda Fittazroy
How about Curtin, Fadden and Chifley - all at the same time?

More trivia - these three, with a companion named O'Sullivan (who was never a Prime minister so probably did most of the driving), famously rocked up to the iconic Niagara Cafe in Gundagai in the middle of the night one Saturday in 1942 and demanded to be fed. It was wartime and rationing was in place, so Jack Castrisson, the proprieter at the time, was not letting the opportunity pass. After complaining that rationing was hurting his business, his tea ration was suddenly increased from 28 lb per month to 100 lb per month! Canny!

Nowadays, could three Prime ministers (past, present and future and not all from the same party) share a booth chowing down steak and eggs and drink from the same teapot, them jump back in the same car to continue their journey? Not bloody likely!
"DirtyBallast"
The major influence was that there was mutual respect between all three of them. There are various commentators who have said that each of those men could be trusted to keep his word.
Probably the closest we have come since then was the friendship between Jim Killen (Lib) and Fred Daly (ALP). Daly wrote his book "From Curtin to Kerr" and Killen wrote the Foreword to it. At one stage, Killen was looking for a new secretary, and Fred Daly sent in two applications; one on his own behalf, and one on behalf of his Old English Sheepdog named Sir John. A photo was published with the two men in armchairs, drink in hand, and Sir John lying between them on the floor. Killen said that Daly's application for the job was dismissed immediately, but Sir John was the second last to be eliminated.
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Norda Fittazroy
How about Curtin, Fadden and Chifley - all at the same time?
DirtyBallast
Good idea.  I've started one, but don't let that stop anyone else; it's open go here.

Edit: It's now posted.
  don_dunstan The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Adelaide proud
A great synopsis there Valvegear, Malcolm Turnbull had many good ideas but also had many bad ideas
He was better than Tony Abbot but no better than any other 2000s prime minister

As we get towards the present day I think it would be a good idea to go in reverse and summarise all the PMs that came before Menzies in the current format (ie, next post Chifley, after that Curtin, Fadden etc)
We could also examine Billy Hughes, Stanley Melbourne Bruce and Joe Lyons.
How about Curtin, Fadden and Chifley - all at the same time?

More trivia - these three, with a companion named O'Sullivan (who was never a Prime minister so probably did most of the driving), famously rocked up to the iconic Niagara Cafe in Gundagai in the middle of the night one Saturday in 1942 and demanded to be fed. It was wartime and rationing was in place, so Jack Castrisson, the proprieter at the time, was not letting the opportunity pass. After complaining that rationing was hurting his business, his tea ration was suddenly increased from 28 lb per month to 100 lb per month! Canny!

Nowadays, could three Prime ministers (past, present and future and not all from the same party) share a booth chowing down steak and eggs and drink from the same teapot, them jump back in the same car to continue their journey? Not bloody likely!

Source: Bypass, the story of a road by Michael McGirr.
DirtyBallast
They'd crucify any Prime Minister who did something like that now.
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Norda Fittazroy
The suggestion was made to go back and look at Fadden, Curtin and Chifley and was then modified to consider all three in the one episode. Why not, indeed?

Arthur Fadden took office as Prime Minister on 29 August 1941, and remained there until 7 October in the same year. He was a Country Party man from Queensland and had served a term in the Legislative Assembly there, before losing his seat. He subsequently stood in a by-election for the Federal seat of Darling Downs, and won it.  Under Menzies, Fadden became Leader of the Country Party, meaning that he inherited the mantle of Deputy Prime Minister. It was written of Fadden that "he had no obvious ambitions and he suffered from no delusions of grandeur; he was amiable and gregarious".

Other contenders for the leadership had been John (Black Jack) McEwen, Earle Page (full name Earle Christmas Grafton Page!), and Archie Cameron. McEwen and Page went into the ministry, but Cameron did not. He hit the roof, and Fadden subsequently wrote; “ I attempted to get a word in edgeways and persuade him to discuss the issue on a reasonable basis. He cleared his throat, spat the whole length of the wall-to-wall carpet, pulled off one elastic-sided boot, then the other, and as he threw one into the furthest corner of the room he swore that he would not be found dead with the Country Party mob.” Cameron quit the party and joined the UAP (United Australia Party) under Menzies.

By now, the war was well under way, and Menzies and Opposition Leader John Curtin agreed to form a joint War Council with members from all parties. Fadden was acting PM while Menzies was abroad, and recalled the way he and Curtin cooperated. Beasley, a foundation member of the Council had been defeated in a ballot by Evatt, but Curtin wanted Beasley. He mentioned this to Fadden who suggested that Curtin should write to him saying that the gravity of the situation an increase of two on the Council. Curtin asked, “ Why two?” and Fadden replied that he wanted McEwen. The letter was written – problem solved.

Fast forward to October 1941, when Curtin formally opposed Fadden’s budget, and in conversation with Fadden, it was found that both believed that Fadden did not have the numbers. This was correct, the Fadden government lost the confidence motion, and Curtin formed a minority government after the Governor General, Lord Gowrie, who did not want an election with the parliament barely a year old. He had sought and received assurances from Wilson and Coles, two independents, that they would support Curtin for the remainder of the parliament and avoid any instability in government.

It was only a couple of months later that Pearl Harbour was attacked and war in the Pacific became a reality. This led to Curtin writing to President Roosevelt, making no bones about the fact that Australia wanted and needed American help. The war progressed badly for the Allies. Singapore fell in February 1942 and, in the same month, it hit home with a vengeance when the Japanese bombed Darwin. The raids on Darwin were far more serious than the public was told, and had the government deeply worried. Winston Churchill attempted to divert Australian troops to Burma which Curtin flatly refused, and the soldiers returned to Australia. It has been told often, that Curtin spent sleepless nights walking in the garden, worrying about the safety on those on the troopship until their safe arrival occurred.

Curtin formed a close working relationship with the Allied Supreme Commander in the South West Pacific Area, General Douglas MacArthur. Curtin realised that Australia would be ignored unless it had a strong voice in Washington, D.C., and he wanted that voice to be MacArthur's. He directed Australian commanders to treat MacArthur's orders as if they came from the Australian Government. Biographer John Edwards wrote: “A lesser Australian leader might have grated against MacArthur's vanity, cavilled at his assumption of command, contradicted his grandiloquent claims, satirised his manner. Curtin did not. He seized the chance to share authority with MacArthur, refused to offend his vanity, drew him as close as he could. Of Curtin's military decisions, it was the cleverest, most fruitful, most abidingly successful.”
Curtin won the 1943 election with a swing of 17 seats but as time went by, his health was taking a turn for the worse. The stress of the war had already taken its toll and, in 1944, after travelling abroad for meetings, he suffered a heart attack. He died on 5 July 1945.

Joseph Benedict (Ben) Chifley had been Curtin’s treasurer since 1941. Despite the fact that Frank Forde was Deputy Leader of the Labor Party.  After Curtin’s death, Forde acted as PM for eight days, until Chifley defeated him in a leadership ballot and became Prime Minister.  His early working life would no doubt be approved by our readers. In September 1903, Chifley joined the New South Wales Government Railways as a "shop boy" at the Bathurst depot. He rose through the ranks to engine-cleaner and fireman, and passed for driving in March 1914. He had very good understanding of  locomotives, and became an instructor at the Bathurst Railway Institute. He was based in Bathurst and worked on the Main Western line, except for a few months in 1914 when he drove on the Main Southern line and worked out of Harden.

The radical reforming nature of the Chifley Government was such that, between 1946–49, the Australian Parliament passed 299 Acts, a record up until then, and well beyond the previous record of the Labor Government of Andrew Fisher, which passed 113 Acts from 1910–13.  Some of the more major achievements were The Snowy Mountains Scheme, the establishment of Australian citizenship (instead of the previous “British” category), beginning of ASIO,  and a Pharmaceutical Benefits Plan.

One of Chifley’s pet wishes was to nationalise the Banks, and he attempted this in 1947. It met with massive and very well organised opposition which included a High Court challenge which found the proposed legislation to be unconstitutional. In those days, the Privy Council was the final court of appeal, and it upheld the High Court’s decision. This, and the fact that Chifley held on to the wartime rationing system were to be his ultimate downfall in the 1949 election. Menzies was back at the helm of the Opposition, and campaigned successfully  on these issues and the  ALP’s “softness on Communism”. The ALP retained a majority in the Senate but the House had swung to the Liberals and Country Party.

Chifley, also a heavy smoker, was in poor health, but carried on as opposition leader. Menzies called a double dissolution in April 1951, and achieved control of the House and the Senate.  

In June of that year Chifley  suffered a heart attack in his room at Kurrajong Hotel, and died on the way to hospital. A ball was in progress at Parliament House in celebration of 50 years of Federation, and the news inevitably reached the venue. To his credit, Menzies, who was very upset by the news, made an announcement: “It is my very sorrowful duty during this celebration tonight to tell you that Mr Chifley has died. I don't want to try to talk about him now because, although we were political opponents, he was a friend of mine and yours, and a fine Australian. You will all agree that in the circumstances the festivities should end. It doesn't matter about party politics on an occasion such as this. Oddly enough, in Parliament we get on very well. We sometimes find we have the warmest friendships among people whose politics are not ours. Mr Chifley served this country magnificently for years.”
  DCook Chief Train Controller

Location: The standard state
Again a great synopsis there Valvegear, not much could be said about Fadden but plenty could be said about Curtin and Chifley
John Curtin was probably the single greatest Australian prime minister in history with Chifley as a close second, how many other world leaders worked themselves to death, even after a heart attack he was still working from 2 AM to midnight.
The only problem I have with Curtin's government was the fierce support of the White Australia Policy
Increasing connections with the US was probably one of the greatest decisions made by an Australian prime minister, things would have been very different otherwise
Chifley's decision to commence the Snowy Mountains scheme was also a very good decision for renewable energy, much better than the current plans of wind farms and solar farms
  don_dunstan The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Adelaide proud
Exit; Tony Abbott. Enter; Malcolm Turnbull. As we saw previously, the perceived excesses of Abbott played into Turnbull’s hand, as a different style of Leader was wanted. It could be asked whether anyone in the party really knew exactly what new style was wanted, but the main consideration would seem to be “moderate”, and our second post-war Malcolm took the reins.
Valvegear
I personally had great hopes for Malcolm Bligh Turnbull but was very disappointed.
Turnbull’s working life began as a barrister, and he became General Counsel for Australian Consolidated Press Holdings Group from 1983 to 1985. He was heavily involved in the defence of Kerry Packer against allegations that he, Packer, was the so called “Goanna” of dubious reputation at the Costigan Royal Commission. He also instituted defamation proceedings against the counsel assisting the Commission, Douglas Meagher QC, and this was thrown out of court with some withering comments from the bench. It made Turnbull many enemies within the NSW Bar Association, and he quit that association. In 1987 he started his career in merchant banking. He had already made unsuccessful attempts at Liberal preselection for the seats of Wentworth, Lowe and Mosman, and allowed his party membership to lapse in 1986, before rejoining in 2000. In 1993, Turnbull was appointed by Prime Minister Paul Keating as Chair of the Republic Advisory Committee, charged with exploring ways of moving Australia to a republican form of government by replacing the Queen of Australia with an elected Australian head of state. Later that year, Turnbull became Chair of the Australian Republican Movement, a position he would hold until 2000. He was an elected delegate at the 1998 Australian Constitutional Convention in Canberra. Turnbull was an active campaigner in the unsuccessful 1999 referendum to establish an Australian republic, serving as Chair of the Yes Committee. When the referendum failed, he fell out with John Howard who, he said, had manipulated the question put to the public so that it didn’t ask whether people actually wanted a republic at all. Turnbull retired from the Australian Republican Movement in 2000.
Valvegear
Also during the early 2000's was rumored to have asked Kim Beasley for a crack at a seat somewhere in Sydney as a Labor Party man but was told that he was too conservative for Labor and naturally a Liberal Party man.

You have to wonder whether all this shopping around for a seat was really more about trying to propel himself into office more than trying to represent the people of Australia.
In 2003, Turnbull again tried for the seat of Wentworth which he achieved after a bitter preselection campaign, and the expenditure of over $600,000 at the 2004 election. The swing was such that the seat became classified as marginal for the first time since 1993. From then onwards, Turnbull made the seat his own and in November 2007, after Howard became only the second sitting Prime Minister to lose his seat, Turnbull lost a leadership ballot by three votes to Brendan Nelson, who immediately named Turnbull as Shadow Treasurer. Months of poor polling went by until Turnbull ousted Nelson and became Opposition Leader.
Valvegear
Very impatient to get the big chair.
This was to be the start of some displeasure at Turnbull’s alleged failure to consult before speaking out. There was a variety of issues, including the infamous Godwin Grech/OzCar fiasco, which embarrassed him and weakened his position to the point where Abbott challenged and won.
Valvegear
Really he proved to be quite flat-footed and ineffective as an opposition leader against the incumbent and dominant Rudd government (despite problems emerging within Rudd's own cabinet). The Godwin Grech thing showed that he had a level of desperation to try and get traction against Rudd. But then along comes the most spectacular and apparently capable opposition leader of all time - Tony Abbott - to show how its done...
Fast forward to 2015 when Turnbull became Prime Minister. The inevitable Cabinet reshuffle took place in he increased the number of female Cabinet Ministers from two to five and appointed Marise Payne as Australia's first female Minister for Defence. The number of Cabinet Ministers rose from 19 to 21. Turnbull said that there would be no change to his key policy differences with Abbott until after an election. These issues included climate change, republicanism and same-sex marriage. Turnbull stated that he would not lead a government that did not take climate change seriously. At the subsequent election in July 2016, the Coalition lost 14 seats and held power by just one seat. There was a 10.9% swing against Turnbull in Wentworth. One of his pet projects did finally come to pass with the adoption of same sex marriage; a topic which caused bitter divisions within the Coalition. A temporary hiccup saw Turnbull lose his majority in the House over eligibility of those with dual citizenship. Barnaby Joyce and Fiona Nash were ruled ineligible by the High Court, and John Alexander resigned. Subsequent by-elections restored the status quo. By now, disquiet was bubbling away and, in August 2018, culminated in a leadership challenge by Peter Dutton which Turnbull won by 48 votes to 35. This spill highlighted ideological tensions within the Liberal Party, between the moderate wing led by Turnbull and the conservative wing represented by Dutton and Tony Abbott. From 21 to 23 August, tensions mounted and Dutton announced that he would seek a second spill. Turnbull replied that if Dutton was found eligible to serve in Parliament he would call such a meeting, vacate the leadership (regarding the petition as a vote of no confidence) and not stand in the subsequent leadership election. Dutton was found to be "not ineligible" to serve, and the party meeting was then called. The leadership was spilled, and Scott Morrison was elected as Turnbull's successor by 45 votes over Dutton with 40. In his final press conference as Prime Minister, Turnbull denounced Dutton and Abbott as "wreckers". On 27 August Turnbull announced that he would resign from Parliament over the coming days. On 31 August 2018 he tendered a formal notice of resignation to the Speaker of the House of Representatives. As is well known, he then concentrated on his book, “A Bigger Picture”, which was received with lukewarm feelings at best. One writer said that the book told of the love affair between Malcolm Turnbull and Malcolm Turnbull, which was one of the great parliamentary love stories of all time.
Valvegear
Spat the dummy in spectacular fashion and then continued to try and wreak the party that elevated him to the top job - and expressed very bitter disappointment when Morrison subsequently won in May 2019.

He was driven by his own personal ideologies and ideas which didn't necessarily gel with the political party that he'd chosen as the vehicle to elevate himself to the top job. Climate change in particular was something that he used relentlessly as the very most important issue facing the nation but then conveniently failed to mention that his own fortune was benefiting financially from the decisions he made as Prime Minister (despite the fact that he still denies it).

And the republic thing is as dead as the dodo - who seriously still talks about the need for it in the 21st century? The most pressing issues for the majority are good quality jobs, the cost of energy and housing and the struggle to survive day-to-day - not the republic or carbon-netural energy generation, they're really issues for the woke-inner city types that would normally vote Labor anyway.

Dutton also made the critical mistake in the final days of going to dinner with friends to celebrate their impending victory against Turnbull thus allowing ScoMo to get the numbers up as the dark horse in the final hours.

Anyway, it's all history now...
  don_dunstan The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Adelaide proud
I've been reading my Kevin Rudd book but I also have book about the war-era leadership called "The Last Bastion" by Keith Williamson, no doubt that'll be informative about the change in Prime Ministers and the management of the Japanese threat.
  michaelgm Chief Commissioner

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