Wagon with fully opening sides aims to provide warehouse-style loading

 
Topic moved from News by bevans on 25 Nov 2020 20:36
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
interesting design and one which would make loading a lot quicker and easier.  Would beat trying to load a container from the ends.

Wagon with fully opening sides aims to provide warehouse-style loading

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  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Two 'sort of similar' concepts existed here in the form of the SAR/AN's SLX/ALHX vans and the Victorian 'Prairie' wagons whose classification I forget. Neither class existed in great numbers.

The SLX/ALHX wagon sliding doors could be moved to allow side access to the entire wagon length but, obviously, not all at the same time. I am not aware of the niche traffic or the real use for which these wagons were built. I assume they ran successfully in local traffics as well as appearing from time to time in the various interstate paper traffics originating in Mount Gambier. Others here will know more, no doubt.

I know little of the Victorian prairie wagons as they were confined to local traffic as far as I am aware. They were not entirely successful I understand as their hooped (prairie wagon style) tarpaulin covering which ran on deck mounted rails was prone to misalignment. As far as I am aware these wagons were confined to the BG and did not normally work interstate. Again others will hopefully know more.

Open to correction as always.
  Greensleeves Chief Commissioner

Location: If it isn't obvious by now, it should be.
Two 'sort of similar' concepts existed here in the form of the SAR/AN's SLX/ALHX vans and the Victorian 'Prairie' wagons whose classification I forget. Neither class existed in great numbers.

The SLX/ALHX wagon sliding doors could be moved to allow side access to the entire wagon length but, obviously, not all at the same time. I am not aware of the niche traffic or the real use for which these wagons were built. I assume they ran successfully in local traffics as well as appearing from time to time in the various interstate paper traffics originating in Mount Gambier. Others here will know more, no doubt.

I know little of the Victorian prairie wagons as they were confined to local traffic as far as I am aware. They were not entirely successful I understand as their hooped (prairie wagon style) tarpaulin covering which ran on deck mounted rails was prone to misalignment. As far as I am aware these wagons were confined to the BG and did not normally work interstate. Again others will hopefully know more.

Open to correction as always.
YM-Mundrabilla

There was also the VBFX conversion done by Vline Freight. Only one done and a second partly converted but never completed.
  ngarner Deputy Commissioner

Location: Seville
Two 'sort of similar' concepts existed here in the form of the SAR/AN's SLX/ALHX vans and the Victorian 'Prairie' wagons whose classification I forget. Neither class existed in great numbers.

The SLX/ALHX wagon sliding doors could be moved to allow side access to the entire wagon length but, obviously, not all at the same time. I am not aware of the niche traffic or the real use for which these wagons were built. I assume they ran successfully in local traffics as well as appearing from time to time in the various interstate paper traffics originating in Mount Gambier. Others here will know more, no doubt.

I know little of the Victorian prairie wagons as they were confined to local traffic as far as I am aware. They were not entirely successful I understand as their hooped (prairie wagon style) tarpaulin covering which ran on deck mounted rails was prone to misalignment. As far as I am aware these wagons were confined to the BG and did not normally work interstate. Again others will hopefully know more.

Open to correction as always.
YM-Mundrabilla
They were coded VFNX and you're correct about the misalignment issues with the hoops. I don't recall ever seeing them on SG but they were in common use between Montague and Morwell, for newsprint traffic. There were originally 50 of them.
Peter J Vincent, spark driver and VR wagon historian extraordinaire, has a web site covering almost any VR rolling stock up to the mid-late 1980s and well worth a look
The VFNX page is here PJV VFNX

Neil

Neil
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Two 'sort of similar' concepts existed here in the form of the SAR/AN's SLX/ALHX vans and the Victorian 'Prairie' wagons whose classification I forget. Neither class existed in great numbers.

The SLX/ALHX wagon sliding doors could be moved to allow side access to the entire wagon length but, obviously, not all at the same time. I am not aware of the niche traffic or the real use for which these wagons were built. I assume they ran successfully in local traffics as well as appearing from time to time in the various interstate paper traffics originating in Mount Gambier. Others here will know more, no doubt.

I know little of the Victorian prairie wagons as they were confined to local traffic as far as I am aware. They were not entirely successful I understand as their hooped (prairie wagon style) tarpaulin covering which ran on deck mounted rails was prone to misalignment. As far as I am aware these wagons were confined to the BG and did not normally work interstate. Again others will hopefully know more.

Open to correction as always.
They were coded VFNX and you're correct about the misalignment issues with the hoops. I don't recall ever seeing them on SG but they were in common use between Montague and Morwell, for newsprint traffic. There were originally 50 of them.
Peter J Vincent, spark driver and VR wagon historian extraordinaire, has a web site covering almost any VR rolling stock up to the mid-late 1980s and well worth a look
The VFNX page is here PJV VFNX

Neil

Neil
ngarner
Thanks Neil.
I hadn't realised that there were as many as 50 VFNXs but then local Victorian traffics were not really on my radar.
Peter Vincent's site is certainly a mine of wagon information. There was also another wagon man around at the time (Robbie O' something) I think? I met him (IIRC) about 100 years ago as 'Robbie O' Wagon' Smile.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Two 'sort of similar' concepts existed here in the form of the SAR/AN's SLX/ALHX vans and the Victorian 'Prairie' wagons whose classification I forget. Neither class existed in great numbers.

The SLX/ALHX wagon sliding doors could be moved to allow side access to the entire wagon length but, obviously, not all at the same time. I am not aware of the niche traffic or the real use for which these wagons were built. I assume they ran successfully in local traffics as well as appearing from time to time in the various interstate paper traffics originating in Mount Gambier. Others here will know more, no doubt.

I know little of the Victorian prairie wagons as they were confined to local traffic as far as I am aware. They were not entirely successful I understand as their hooped (prairie wagon style) tarpaulin covering which ran on deck mounted rails was prone to misalignment. As far as I am aware these wagons were confined to the BG and did not normally work interstate. Again others will hopefully know more.

Open to correction as always.

There was also the VBFX conversion done by Vline Freight. Only one done and a second partly converted but never completed.
Greensleeves
Thanks Greensleeves.
Something else that I didn't know.
  nswtrains Chief Commissioner

Two 'sort of similar' concepts existed here in the form of the SAR/AN's SLX/ALHX vans and the Victorian 'Prairie' wagons whose classification I forget. Neither class existed in great numbers.

The SLX/ALHX wagon sliding doors could be moved to allow side access to the entire wagon length but, obviously, not all at the same time. I am not aware of the niche traffic or the real use for which these wagons were built. I assume they ran successfully in local traffics as well as appearing from time to time in the various interstate paper traffics originating in Mount Gambier. Others here will know more, no doubt.

I know little of the Victorian prairie wagons as they were confined to local traffic as far as I am aware. They were not entirely successful I understand as their hooped (prairie wagon style) tarpaulin covering which ran on deck mounted rails was prone to misalignment. As far as I am aware these wagons were confined to the BG and did not normally work interstate. Again others will hopefully know more.

Open to correction as always.

There was also the VBFX conversion done by Vline Freight. Only one done and a second partly converted but never completed.
Thanks Greensleeves.
Something else that I didn't know.
YM-Mundrabilla
If the Yanks haven't used the design steer well clear of it. European design equals high maintenance costs and rather fragile.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Two 'sort of similar' concepts existed here in the form of the SAR/AN's SLX/ALHX vans and the Victorian 'Prairie' wagons whose classification I forget. Neither class existed in great numbers.

The SLX/ALHX wagon sliding doors could be moved to allow side access to the entire wagon length but, obviously, not all at the same time. I am not aware of the niche traffic or the real use for which these wagons were built. I assume they ran successfully in local traffics as well as appearing from time to time in the various interstate paper traffics originating in Mount Gambier. Others here will know more, no doubt.

I know little of the Victorian prairie wagons as they were confined to local traffic as far as I am aware. They were not entirely successful I understand as their hooped (prairie wagon style) tarpaulin covering which ran on deck mounted rails was prone to misalignment. As far as I am aware these wagons were confined to the BG and did not normally work interstate. Again others will hopefully know more.

Open to correction as always.

There was also the VBFX conversion done by Vline Freight. Only one done and a second partly converted but never completed.
Thanks Greensleeves.
Something else that I didn't know.
If the Yanks haven't used the design steer well clear of it. European design equals high maintenance costs and rather fragile.
nswtrains
Absolutely.
AAR* Standards for freight . Don't pussyfoot around with toys!
* Association of American Railroads
  M636C Minister for Railways

The PJV entry on the all door VBFX is attributed to Rob O'Regan


Peter
  ngarner Deputy Commissioner

Location: Seville
Appears Rob O'Regan is YM's Robbie O, as in Robbie O'Wagunz

I can't say I've heard of him as a wagon expert but I have heard of him; formerly of South Dynon depot and then various country ones before qualifying as a driver and moving to the sparks, like Peter. Apparently started there 2 years before I did.

Just checked victorianrailways.net and he has a photography website linked, last updated 18 months ago plus a bio, where he owns up to the nickname.

Neil

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