Woman killed after sticking head out train window

 

News article: Woman killed after sticking head out train window

A woman who stuck her head out of a high-speed train window was killed by an overhanging tree branch, an inquest jury in the UK concluded.

  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales
Droplight windows is a new concept and term for me.

Woman killed after sticking head out train window

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  GoldenGirl Junior Train Controller

Droplight windows is a new concept and term for me.

Woman killed after sticking head out train window
freightgate
The type of window that opens downwards into the door. Used on older style carriages.
  route14 Chief Commissioner

If the set has openable windows, it's nowhere near high speed.
  KRviator Moderator

Location: Up the front
If the set has openable windows, it's nowhere near high speed.
route14
Better tell the Poms that. It was on a BR MkIII coach that makes up the bulk of their HST fleet...
  SinickleBird Assistant Commissioner

Location: Qantas Club at Mudgee International Airport
Not sure changing the colour of the “do not poke head out of the window” sign would help someone under the influence of alcohol.

Regrettably, you need to engineer against stupid behaviour these days. Which means locked doors and sealed windows. Perhaps also some kind of seat-restraints as used on theme park rides. Cages for passengers under the affluence of incohol.
  Graham4405 The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Dalby Qld
Cages for passengers under the affluence of incohol.
SinickleBird
Perhaps doors that only open while the train is moving at speed for such people? Laughing
  KRviator Moderator

Location: Up the front
Perhaps doors that only open while the train is moving at speed for such people? Laughing
Graham4405
I've never understood this method of "open window - stick arm through - grab exterior handle - open door" that BR engineering thought was an acceptable solution to getting off a train.

I mean, I get that they invented the train, heck even the language but surely, someone at BR engineering would have asked the question "Why don't we put a handle on the inside of the door too?"
  justapassenger Minister for Railways

Perhaps doors that only open while the train is moving at speed for such people? Laughing
I've never understood this method of "open window - stick arm through - grab exterior handle - open door" that BR engineering thought was an acceptable solution to getting off a train.

I mean, I get that they invented the train, heck even the language but surely, someone at BR engineering would have asked the question "Why don't we put a handle on the inside of the door too?"
KRviator
BREL did put inside handles on the doors in the original Mk3 build.

BR management decided to remove them and plate over where they had been (and place subsequent orders without them) because - and this is the strange part - they thought it would be safer without them!

The UIC standard door locking mechanism already in use all over Europe was not an option because BREL had a big Not Invented Here problem.
  YM-Mundrabilla Minister for Railways

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
'... The UIC standard door locking mechanism already in use all over Europe was not an option because BREL had a big Not Invented Here problem. ... '

BR is not alone with the 'not invented here' problem .....................
It spread to the Colonies long ago and persists to this day. Rolling Eyes
  Nightfire Minister for Railways

Location: Gippsland
If the set has openable windows, it's nowhere near high speed.
Better tell the Poms that. It was on a BR MkIII coach that makes up the bulk of their HST fleet...
KRviator
I remember traveling on one of these trains between Salisbury and Penzance (2013) and to open the door from the Inside you had to open the sash window and stick your arm out to open the handle on the outside.

I also remember the conductor would lock the train doors 30 seconds before scheduled departure, this would result In some extremely raged late coming passengers (they simply got a cheeky wave and the conductor pointing to the sign on the door outlining the traveling rules)
  route14 Chief Commissioner

A few years ago I was surprised to hear a comment from a British tourist that a two-pin plug that fits into a three-slot socket was safer than China's parallel two-pin plug that fits into a two-slot socket.  If there is no earth pin, it doesn't matter what sort of socket it's plugged into.
  RTT_Rules Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Dubai UAE
I've never understood this method of "open window - stick arm through - grab exterior handle - open door" that BR engineering thought was an acceptable solution to getting off a train.

I mean, I get that they invented the train, heck even the language but surely, someone at BR engineering would have asked the question "Why don't we put a handle on the inside of the door too?"
KRviator
Agree

This didn't help either "142mg in 100ml of blood – meaning she was nearly twice the drink-drive limit."
  The Vinelander Minister for Railways

Location: Ballan, Victoria on the Ballarat Line
If the set has openable windows, it's nowhere near high speed.
route14

The old HST's with these windows and outside door handles travelled at up to 125MPH...that's over 200Km/h and is definitely in the realm of 'High speed'.

Mostly the old HST's being replaced by the cheap and nasty Hitachi trains are being converted to plug doors like we have here in Oz.

Mike.
  bingley hall Minister for Railways

Location: Last train to Skaville
If the set has openable windows, it's nowhere near high speed.
Better tell the Poms that. It was on a BR MkIII coach that makes up the bulk of their HST fleet...
I remember traveling on one of these trains between Salisbury and Penzance (2013) and to open the door from the Inside you had to open the sash window and stick your arm out to open the handle on the outside.

I also remember the conductor would lock the train doors 30 seconds before scheduled departure, this would result In some extremely raged late coming passengers (they simply got a cheeky wave and the conductor pointing to the sign on the door outlining the traveling rules)
Nightfire

You need to up your meds grandpa. There were no sash windows on trains in the UK 2013. There were none in use from the mid-60s onwards. There were still drop windows as described above, but by 2013 other than the HSTs and few other examples the vast majority of in the UK were plug door or sliding doors.
  WimbledonW Chief Train Controller

Location: Sydney
Old NSW sign in single deck cars:

"Do not lean out of windows or doors"
"Keep wholly within the car"
"When standing near doorways keep a firm hold"

Extra fourth line:

"If you can get in that far".
  Nightfire Minister for Railways

Location: Gippsland

You need to up your meds grandpa. There were no sash windows on trains in the UK 2013. There were none in use from the mid-60s onwards. There were still drop windows as described above, but by 2013 other than the HSTs and few other examples the vast majority of in the UK were plug door or sliding doors.
bingley hall
Yes the drop window as described, I found It very odd for an English passenger train, maybe something you would see In the Eastern Bloc.

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