Where am I Victoria? - Non Cryptic - #3

 
  Faredodger Chief Commissioner

Location: Hiding anywhere the ticket inspectors can't see me
Not Charlton.

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  JMarto15 Locomotive Driver

Darnum?
  Faredodger Chief Commissioner

Location: Hiding anywhere the ticket inspectors can't see me
Not Darnum.

The station concerned once went by another name and was a junction for a tramway.
  doyle Chief Commissioner

Kilmany / Nambrok
  Faredodger Chief Commissioner

Location: Hiding anywhere the ticket inspectors can't see me
Kilmany (the erstwhile Nambrok) is correct.

And it's over to doyle for the next teaser.
  RustyRick Chief Commissioner

Location: South West Vic
Kilmany (the erstwhile Nambrok) is correct.

And it's over to doyle for the next teaser.
Faredodger
So what was its claim to fame?
  Faredodger Chief Commissioner

Location: Hiding anywhere the ticket inspectors can't see me
I must admit I can't find much on it.  Sorry to disappoint.  It was called Nambrok in the early decades of the last century.  It was the junction of a 5'3" timber tramway, which apparently branched off the main line at the up end and was known as the Kilmany Park Tramway.  It opened about 1910, and according to Marc Fiddian, closed in June 1919.  Some sketchy information, courtesy of the Kilmany Centenary Committe, stated that, "According to Peter Woodhead the 'Kilmany Nambrok railway station, in 1926, was the second largest revenue earner of any country station in the state of Victoria.'"

I remember seeing it by the Princes Highway in the late '70s, just east of the highway overpass.  There was a service station nearby, as I recall, and the station was by that time just a platform with a mallee shed.  I don't recall seeing a siding, although the photo here gives evidence of one at that time.  When I went through rather more recently, there was no trace of the station, and the service station was gone.

  duttonbay Minister for Railways

I must admit I can't find much on it.  Sorry to disappoint.  It was called Nambrok in the early decades of the last century.  It was the junction of a 5'3" timber tramway, which apparently branched off the main line at the up end and was known as the Kilmany Park Tramway.  It opened about 1910, and according to Marc Fiddian, closed in June 1919.  Some sketchy information, courtesy of the Kilmany Centenary Committe, stated that, "According to Peter Woodhead the 'Kilmany Nambrok railway station, in 1926, was the second largest revenue earner of any country station in the state of Victoria.'"
Faredodger
The Light Railways free PDFs made available by the LRRSA are normally a good source of information on tramways. But the only reference to Kilmany in 260-odd issues is this brief para, which dates back to issue 13, 1963:

Kilmany Park Steam Tramway By D. Jowett.
Opened on 16th. March 1910, this 5'3" line joined the main line at 118m.10ch.,(up end of Kilmany). It was 2 miles 20 chains  long. An 8 ch. loop siding was provided at the terminus,with a 13-1/2 chain spur to sawmills. All classes of locos were allowed on this line but the maximum speed permitted was 10 m.p.h.
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Richmond Vic
It remains a source of interest to know just what was there, or what they could do, that interested sufficient people to make the place such a money spinner.
  hbedriver Deputy Commissioner

Another driver described the site of the junction some years back.

From the Settlement Road level crossing, the line rises to a small plateau, passing beneath the Prince’s Highway. He claimed the line was built to save the customers the need to drag their loading to the station. The line seemed to start just after Settlement Road, right hand diverge facing down trains.

Looking from the train at this point (including inside the carriage), a scar can be seen curving away. Looking at the satellite view on maps suggests at least the first part of what could be a formation.

Often wondered about the history, any information welcome.
  kitchgp Chief Commissioner

According to the timeline at VictorianRailways.net, the Kilmany Park tramway opened in 1913 and, as mentioned above, connected at 118m 10ch, which puts the junction about 1m 15ch (2090 yards) west of Kilmany, near the Settlement Road level crossing (Shultz Lane East). The tramway length of 2m would take it to the banks of the La Trobe River. There’s a ubiquitous windbreak of pine trees that shows on Google Earth that could follow were the line would have been. The 1918 WTT on VictorianRailways.net website lists the stations of Ingle (N C), at 1181/4m and Kilmany Park (N C), at 1201/2m: https://www.victorianrailways.net/timetables/eastern_wtt_may1918.pdf#page=4

Ingle station is listed in the VR Annual FY Reports from 1915 to 1920 inclusive. VicSig’s history of Kilmany shows it becoming an Electric Staff station, with the sections Rosedale – Kilmany – Sale in 1913, ie about the time the tramway opened.


This is a rather superficial history but it seems part of the original Kilmany Park estate (8600 of 12000 acres) was sold off in 1911 and subdivided under the unsuccessful Closer Settlement Scheme. A condition of the sale was that sugar beet had to be grown to supply the government-owned mill at Maffra, which had just been taken out of mothballs. Pure speculation, however, the line might have been used to transport beet to Maffra, although if the junction faced Down trains, it would be a complicated trip via Sale (as it was then) and Stratford or a lengthy one via Traralgon.

From Victorian Places website:
https://www.victorianplaces.com.au/node/68035

From Maffra and District Historical Society website:
https://www.maffra.net.au/our-history/sugar-beet/


The Kilmany Park mansion, which appears to have been at the eastern end (east of Fulham and at the other end of Settlement Road) of the original estate, still exists, currently as a B & B, and has an interesting history, including as a church-run boy’s farm. The Duke of Cornwall and York (latterly King George V) visited in 1901, presumably after opening the first Federal Parliament at the Exhibition Buildings:

https://www.kilmanypark.com/

http://angustrumble.blogspot.com/2008/12/kilmany-park_24.html
  Valvegear Oliver Bullied, CME

Location: Richmond Vic
It never ceases to amaze me that we have people with access to all sorts of information, who are happy to post it here for the benefit of other readers.
This time, it's kitchgp who has starred, and many thanks to him.
  doyle Chief Commissioner

Wow I got it, I've followed this thread for an age, lots of history
Whom ever wants the road, steam ahead
  doyle Chief Commissioner

Was the tramway that gave it to me
  Faredodger Chief Commissioner

Location: Hiding anywhere the ticket inspectors can't see me
Well, doyle, if you've been following the thread for a while, you must have learned plenty, just as the rest of us have.  That's the fun of it.

Why don't you have a crack?
  doyle Chief Commissioner

OK

There were only two of this type of station only one remains, name both stations

(I certainly hope I have this question right)
  hbedriver Deputy Commissioner

What about Dunkeld and Penshurst?
  kitchgp Chief Commissioner

Maryborough and Oaklands - DG (BG & SG) platforms

(Southern Cross, of course, but that's outside the scope.)
  doyle Chief Commissioner

Not Dunkeld and Penshurst


Not Maryborough and Oaklands
  doyle Chief Commissioner

The remaining station (still in operation) was relocated to its current location,a second platform was added in 1991
  kitchgp Chief Commissioner

Sale and Daylesford
  doyle Chief Commissioner

Not Sale and Daylesford
  JMarto15 Locomotive Driver

Melton and Parwan?
  doyle Chief Commissioner

Melton is right but the other is not parwan, think further west
  doyle Chief Commissioner

Melton station was originally built in the town of leeor in 1898 and was relocated later in the same year, the style is the name of the other station that was destroyed

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