Disjoined Australia Post postcodes?

 
  james.au Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney, NSW
Im figuring that some RP members might have the answer to this so here goes.

Why are there some strange postcodes in Southern NSW that are disconnected from each other?

Do a Google Maps search for 'postcode 2640' around Albury and 'postcode 2652' in the Riverina and see what i mean. How have these codes ended up this way with so many disconnected parts, in the case of 2652 spanning over 300kms?

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  Expost Chief Commissioner

Have a look at postcode 4702. It extends from the Central Qld coast over 600km inland to past Longreach. The reason for this is, in the past, all small communities serviced by mail contract from, what is now Central Queensland Mail Centre, had this postcode. Over time, some of these communities have grown considerably, Gracemere and Emu Park spring to mind. Emu Park has now got its own postcode. Gracemere is still fighting for theirs. Some of these locations out west are nothing more than scattered properties, previously with a small community, which is now gone, but the area retains the postcode.

Generally, in Qld anyhow, postcodes were allocated in a fairly methodical order. Brisbane City area 4000 to 4004, Brisbane North suburbs, 4005 to 4099, Brisbane South suburbs, 4100 to 4199, Gold Coast area 42xx, Ipswich and to the west 43xx, Caboolture and the Sunshine Coast 45xx, Gympie up to Gladstone and out west 4600 to 4699, Rockhampton and to the west up to about Bowen 4700 to 4799, Bowen to the tip of Cape York 4800 to 4899. Obviously, as communities grow, and deserve their own postcodes, the number available reduces, so therefore anomolies occur. Remember, the postcode system commenced in the 60s, I think it was.

As my username suggests, I spent quite a lot of years in that employment, and it will take me quite a few years to match it with my railway career, if thats possible.
  justapassenger Minister for Railways

The simple answer is that postcodes (both the 4 digit postcodes the public sees and the 11+1 digit individual address codes) exist for the benefit of the postal system, not as a status symbol for a place.

The number of addresses matters far more to both postcode systems than the geographical area covered by a 4 digit postcode - which means the biggest 'problem' areas with the system are not rural areas but actually outer suburbs which were farmland at the time of the system's introduction in 1967.

Any politician who campaigns on changing postcodes is putting themselves in the running for getting last preference from me - or no preference at all in the case of Senate or council elections where not all preferences are required. No area I have lived in has ever been so idyllic that the postcode even ranks among the top 20 issues needing attention.
  Expost Chief Commissioner

The simple answer is that postcodes (both the 4 digit postcodes the public sees and the 11+1 digit individual address codes) exist for the benefit of the postal system, not as a status symbol for a place.

The number of addresses matters far more to both postcode systems than the geographical area covered by a 4 digit postcode - which means the biggest 'problem' areas with the system are not rural areas but actually outer suburbs which were farmland at the time of the system's introduction in 1967.

Any politician who campaigns on changing postcodes is putting themselves in the running for getting last preference from me - or no preference at all in the case of Senate or council elections where not all preferences are required. No area I have lived in has ever been so idyllic that the postcode even ranks among the top 20 issues needing attention.
justapassenger
One problem with this is, Insurance companies use postcodes to identify high risk areas, such as flooding or cyclones, and increase their premiums for people living in those post code areas. Now when a postcode ranges over hundreds of kms, then you have issues with people, for example, not being able to get insurance against cyclone damage, when the reality is, if they saw a cyclone, then the end of the world is neigh. Its one reason being touted for a seperate postcode at Gracemere, CQ.

The orange barcodes (and black barcodes in the address panes of business mail) that have appeared on mail over the last decade are for automated sorting. Every single address in Australia has a unique barcode. Businesses who adopted these barcodes recieved reduced rates of postage. Initially, these barcodes managed to sort letters for a particular delivery centre. Then, as the system was developed, it sorted mail down to a particular postal run, then eventually to individual streets on these runs, and now, mail comes in trays, already presorted into delivery order, for the postie to put up in their sorting frames, to be combined with the little manually sorted mail that comes in. Back in my day, we have pidgeon hole frames, which we double sorted into, first sorting mail into street pidgeon holes, then each pidgeon hole into delivery order. Todays posties have what are called V sort frames. Where two delivery addresses, that are side by side, get one V sort slot, and their mail goes into it. Its a much quicker system, only let down by mass mail outs by people like politicians at election time, which tend to overload the frames. Ahh, the stories I could tell about that job.

And yes, I hate the new electric postie trikes. Give me a Honda 110 any day.
  justapassenger Minister for Railways

One problem with this is, Insurance companies use postcodes to identify high risk areas, such as flooding or cyclones, and increase their premiums for people living in those post code areas. Now when a postcode ranges over hundreds of kms, then you have issues with people, for example, not being able to get insurance against cyclone damage, when the reality is, if they saw a cyclone, then the end of the world is neigh. Its one reason being touted for a seperate postcode at Gracemere, CQ.
Expost
I see this as a problem with the insurance industry, not a problem with the postal system.

Perhaps the insurance industry should be switching over to ABS statistical areas.

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