Plugging a Vintage Telephone Exchange Into The Internet So People Can Use It

 
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
The day has finally come to wire the exchange into the internet! See a load of ongoing project and their progressions before the videos!



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9rh50BSv_CE

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  GrahamH Chief Commissioner

Location: At a terminal on the www.
Wonderful! Brilliant find, you've made my day.

Thanks so much for posting this.
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Wonderful! Brilliant find, you've made my day.

Thanks so much for posting this.
GrahamH

Most welcome and to think @Michelle12 worked on this stuff for Telstra.

You can call it in +44 1843 808393
  GrahamH Chief Commissioner

Location: At a terminal on the www.
I was also trained on this type of gear as a PMG trainee. However I only ever worked in transmission related areas, Transmission Measurements and Radio Installation. I heard plenty of SxS switching as I did these jobs though.
  s3_gunzel Not a gunzel developer

Location: Western Sydney, AU
Wonderful! Brilliant find, you've made my day.

Thanks so much for posting this.

Most welcome and to think @Michelle12 worked on this stuff for Telstra.

You can call it in +44 1843 808393
bevans
We need a step by step switch for Railpage. Fight me. Razz
  YM-Mundrabilla The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Glad some on here have even the vaguest idea what this is all about.
I haven't a clue and will stick with steam/diesel where I can see the big ends going round.
Perhaps an Idiots Guide ?.....................
  s3_gunzel Not a gunzel developer

Location: Western Sydney, AU
Perhaps an Idiots Guide ?.....................
YM-Mundrabilla
I'd like to explain it to you - I would - but AT&T did a better job than I ever could:



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZePwin92cI
  YM-Mundrabilla The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Perhaps an Idiots Guide ?.....................
I'd like to explain it to you - I would - but AT&T did a better job than I ever could:



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZePwin92cI
s3_gunzel
Thanks S3 - an informative youtube video.

Actually, I had seen one of these 'mechanical' telephone exchanges as a kid about 100 years ago and, more recently (about 50 years ago) a similar (?) Ericsson PABX that we had at the office which seemed to make similar noises anyway.

The bit that I didn't get was the reference to connecting the thing 'to the internet' and I am still not sure about this? Perhaps you or others will have further thoughts/advice on this aspect that might help.

Is it, perhaps, merely a means of making the mechanical switchgear work for demonstration purposes or have I missed the point entirely? If so, it would not be the first time!Laughing
  s3_gunzel Not a gunzel developer

Location: Western Sydney, AU
Actually, I had seen one of these 'mechanical' telephone exchanges as a kid about 100 years ago and, more recently (about 50 years ago) a similar (?) Ericsson PABX that we had at the office which seemed to make similar noises anyway.
YM-Mundrabilla
PABX devices tended to use relays rather than step-by-step switches, as far as I am aware. They would have made similar sounds.

The bit that I didn't get was the reference to connecting the thing 'to the internet' and I am still not sure about this? Perhaps you or others will have further thoughts/advice on this aspect that might help.
YM-Mundrabilla
Ah, thanks for clarifying.

Ok, so consider the NBN landline service you've got now. Unlike the old Telstra Copper lines, your phone now requires power and - critically - an internet connection, as it is a technology known as VoIP, or Voice over Internet Protocol.

Is it, perhaps, merely a means of making the mechanical switchgear work for demonstration purposes or have I missed the point entirely? If so, it would not be the first time!Laughing
YM-Mundrabilla
Yeah so, this equipment is in a museum in the UK, from what I have been able to glean (and Brian has provided a +44 number, a UK number). I'd love to have the Telstra Museum do the same sort of thing. Having been to the one in Bankstown a total of once, I garnered an affinity for hearing the clacking of these step by step switches. It's a good thing they're still around. Problem is, as the way that phone technologies has moved away from copper, these have fallen out of favour; and while yes, you can use it in a museum setting, sometimes it's more fun to call to and from your mobile phone.
  Aaron The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: University of Adelaide SA


The bit that I didn't get was the reference to connecting the thing 'to the internet' and I am still not sure about this? Perhaps you or others will have further thoughts/advice on this aspect that might help.
Ah, thanks for clarifying.

Ok, so consider the NBN landline service you've got now. Unlike the old Telstra Copper lines, your phone now requires power and - critically - an internet connection, as it is a technology known as VoIP, or Voice over Internet Protocol.
s3_gunzel
Basically, the equipment in the video is no longer capable of communicating with the 'new' UK (or most other places in the world) phone system.

His mate that turned up with that computer in a 'boring cardboard box' had basically built a computer to 'translate' from the pulse counting system of old exchange to the new system the 'internet' uses to communicate. That computer was acting as the interface between the exchange and his modem*, doing the 'translation' of between the two different 'languages'.

* Actually, it wasn't really shown that well, the computer may well have been basically 'the modem' as well, translating directly between the 'exchange' and the 'internet' of the outside world.
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
A point of clarification, I am not sure the UK has entirely gone to a voip system replacing switched voice on a national basis.  I am aware the NBN does this for a lot of sites (not all) and there is still some switched voice, but the UK not sure this is the same footprint, so it is important to distinguish between the SxS (step x step) exchange and a digital exchange (like an Ericsson AXE) used by Telstra and many other  carriers.

The critical concept exchanges went digital from SxS well before the voip concepts were introduced and there were interim exchange designs and implementations in the analogue space prior to digital exchanges and Ericsson was only one brand of a few.

AXE in a video



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5MbKCWnAaU
  YM-Mundrabilla The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
Thanks S3, Aaron and Bevans.

Some more things that I have learnt for today.

The final (Bevans) video says it all for me with computerised (whatever you call it) technology - 'nothing to see here'. As I said earlier I am generally OK if I can see the wheels turning, the valves moving, the big ends going round or a line on a train graph but with electronics leave me out.

Thanks again all. Smile
  Graham4405 The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: In exile
but with electronics leave me out.
YM-Mundrabilla
My "Irony Meter" just went off: I assume you used an electronic device to type that! Wink
  Donald Chief Commissioner

Location: Donald. Duck country.
He used his steam powered typewriter.
  YM-Mundrabilla The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: Mundrabilla but I'd rather be in Narvik
He used his steam powered typewriter.
Donald
Which he bought for $4.00 from a 'real railway organisation' and upon which the YMs typed several theses.
Still got it (somewhere).
  Gayspie Deputy Commissioner
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Thanks for sharing that video I had forgotten even thou I worked for them at the time.

So how does your home phone (or did your home phone) connect to the exchange?  Via the copper pairing system from the street into the MDF where the pairs all terminated and then from there into the exchange equipment (well I have never seen how the copper is connected to the AXE perhaps someone can provide a view.

This exchange is GUIL or Guilford Exchange NSW.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qcc7i2cOoRE
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
Another gem from Telecom Australia



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CQc_ii2O5Sg
  GrahamH Chief Commissioner

Location: At a terminal on the www.
Have a new job at Telecom???



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2B9wFhNR_es



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PbqrWRSlyog
  GrahamH Chief Commissioner

Location: At a terminal on the www.
Heard about these new-fangled mobile phones? You can dial your own call, no operator needed.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMdSIyUXt4s



I worked on some base stations for this system in the mid 80s.

In '79 I did a receiver replacement around Sydney on the 50s single channel, operator connected mobile phone system.
  GrahamH Chief Commissioner

Location: At a terminal on the www.
Bimotional music...



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eFaMpJE6COU

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