No more new bike lanes for CBD after council cops complaints

 
  8502 Assistant Commissioner

The City of Melbourne will hit the brakes on the installation of separated bike lanes in the city centre after a backlash from businesses and residents.

About 19 kilometres of protected bike lanes have been built in and around the CBD over the past two years, with a further 71 kilometres planned by 2030, but the lanes have been criticised by some traders and delivery drivers who say they increase congestion and make it difficult to park.


Cyclists make their way along a narrow bike lane along Collins Street. CREDIT:JOE ARMAO
“Council will consider pausing the bike lane rollout in the Hoddle Grid over the coming year,” a council spokesman said on Thursday.

Lord Mayor Sally Capp admitted that the negative reaction had played a major role in the council’s decision.


“A big part of the feedback about bike lanes is that people felt they were taken by surprise,” she said.

“Because the city was so empty we took that as the opportunity to do capital works like bike lanes because we wouldn’t cause disruption when people came back. But then when people started coming back they said, ‘Hey, what are these new things?’”

Bike lanes: Melbourne City Council puts on the breaks after complaints (theage.com.au)

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  8502 Assistant Commissioner

Should we have less bike lanes, the same or more bike lanes?

They take up a lot of space and you never really see a lot of cyclists on the lanes at any one time.
  Madjikthise Deputy Commissioner

It's not about the bike lanes but as usual about the way it was implemented. There's a belief that we must come up with a new idea at any cost, and avoid anything that works elsewhere and adapt it to our needs.
  BrentonGolding Chief Commissioner

Location: Maldon Junction
They are a nightmare for residents trying to pull out of their driveways. With the parked cars now effectively in what was the LH lane and the bikes zooming up between them and the gutter visibility is very poor

A friend who has had one installed outside of her house says she is considering moving as it is so dangerous.
  Lockspike Chief Commissioner

They are a nightmare for residents trying to pull out of their driveways. With the parked cars now effectively in what was the LH lane and the bikes zooming up between them and the gutter visibility is very poor

A friend who has had one installed outside of her house says she is considering moving as it is so dangerous.
BrentonGolding
While it physically separates the cyclists from the cars (an effective engineering control), in doing so it creates another hazard (not unusual), that of car passengers opening doors across the bike lane. While most (or some?) drivers know that opening the door on the traffic side is hazardous, there has never been any need for door opening on the footpath side to be a carefully considered practice, and I don't think the mindset is going to change.

Maybe the plan is to persist until there are no private motor vehicles in the city, then the cyclists can do as they please. Rolling Eyes
  Heihachi_73 Chief Commissioner

Location: Terminating at Ringwood
Or just close the Little streets (and Flinders Lane, and Elizabeth St at the 19/57/59 tram terminus) to car traffic. The hard part will be keeping pedestrians off the road-turned-bike lane.
  bevans Site Admin

Location: Melbourne, Australia
The greens and the cycling lobby are getting right behind a plan to have the decision reversed.  They are campaigning on the basis the rollout is being stopped indefinitely is my take.

This is not true unless you believe you are in victoria as the way it is done is to announce a pause and then not continue 12 months later.
  Carnot Minister for Railways

Some clarification by Greens Councillor Rohan Leppert (worth reading the whole thread):
  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales
On Tuesday, Melbourne City Council met to consider the future of bike infrastructure in the CBD.

I know that many Victorians ride into the city every day. So on Monday, I emailed and invited you to make a submission to Council ahead of their meeting, to let them know your thoughts about bike lanes in our city.

The Council received over 1000 submissions in support of more protected bike lanes in the CBD (only 10 against), and listened for two hours as supporters of better bike infrastructure shared their ideas and stories.

This huge, positive response from our community has clearly shown the Council the importance of active transport, and has encouraged them to remain committed to investing in better bike infrastructure.
Thank you very much to those of you who took the time to make a submission.

So, what was the outcome of the meeting?

The Council did vote to pause bike lane construction in the Hoddle Grid for the next 12 months, and will use that time to focus on planning for future works in the grid.

This is somewhat frustrating, but doesn’t appear to impact the longer term outlook. The Council has kept its 2030 bike lanetarget, and will not cut the 2022/23 budget for bike lanes in the City of Melbourne. Construction of protected bike lanes will continue in the City of Melbourne outside the Hoddle Grid this year, and Council is on track to deliver more protected bike lanes in 2022-23 than in any financial year to date.

And from what I’ve heard, the outpouring of community support for better bike lanes has built a new consensus and resolve among Council to continue improving active transport in our city.

While this has been a bit of a confusing process on an issue that many care deeply about – whether for or against more bike lanes – it has been wonderful to see supporters of active transport coming together to engage in this important public discussion.

Beyond the CBD there is much to be done. My Green colleagues and I will continue to advocate for improving active transport throughout Victoria.
  Donald Chief Commissioner

Location: Donald. Duck country.
The reason for only 10 objections to more bike lanes is that so many people cannot be bothered going into the CBD anymore.
  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales
The council voted and passed a stay on new bike lanes anyway.
  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales
The Tour de France strats tonight in Copenhagen a city head to toe with separated bike lanes. The Melbourne city council has been for to by the state government appeasing the transport workers union.

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