Ballarat to Buninyong Line

 
  historian Deputy Commissioner

Original station building here:

http://www.slv.vic.gov.au/miscpics/0/0/3/doc/mp003267.shtml

(can't seem to edit my earlier post)


No; this is actually a photograph of Yendon under its original
name of 'Buninyong'.

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  BTrail Beginner

i dont know if this um post is still open but i am currently trying to recreate the Ballarat to Buninyoung Railway i have an i dear where some of the stations are and there distances. i have had grate information from the ballarat city council.

so if any one can pass me on some information about this line that would be help full

thanks in advance
  MOM Chief Commissioner

Location: here, there, everywhere....
Hiya, these posts tend to be historical and always open for additions.

The information you are seeking is already buried in the thread.

Penov, may have completed his work that he makes mention in the first page, apart from that the best I can add would be a jpg of the line as per the ASM I mentioned earlier on.

You'll need to be patient as the maps are all in my repository (buried in archive boxes in my garge, which in a mind slipping moment I never labelled), so you can see my problem.

Now, if you can't wait, head to the Latrobe Libary, which has these maps which you can obtain photocopies of, they are the most fascinating documents that you can have in your possession, especially a complete set of the originals.....lol keep your eyes open on ebay or trash & treasure, I love them for research and have used plenty of obscure parts for road touring events... Very Happy

Penov, how is the project?

MoM
  penov Chief Commissioner

Location: By the shore of Bass Strait.
In answer to your question, MOM, I have completed a file of maps on every closed line in the state. A few areas, such as on the Bunny line, where there have been new subdivisions on the old right of way, have had to be done by dashed lines as the exact area is not apparent.
So the estimates especially from the info and mileages  which was supplied in this thread will have to do.

Most of the rural closed lines were easy as everything is there. I did have trouble with parts of the old NG Puffing Billy lines such as Beech Forrest to Crowes and Whitfield and Walhalla lines as in some cases the right of way may have been along a road. Another problem was the new subdivisions in the south of Korumburra on the Outtrim line although property boundaries gave an idea of where the line went. Overall I downloaded over 500 maps. Now and then further postings in this Archeology forum allow me to update some info.
  BTrail Beginner

would like to see some of the information you have collected on the Ballarat - Buninyong rail
  awsgc24 Minister for Railways
  BTrail Beginner

thanks for the link. That was created by myself BTpedia and wogom.
  wongm GEEWONG

Location: Geelong, Victoria
Here are my photos from about a month ago:
http://www.railgeelong.com/gallery/buninyong-line/

The bit to Eureka still exists, there is a lone embankment and cutting in the middle of suburbia at Spencer Street, then I lost the line until Horwood Drive in Canadian, but it is on private land. The station mound exists at what I assume was Mount Clear, at the University there are some bits left though the middle of the campus, and then I lost it until the descent into Buninyong.

I am not sure how it managed to cross the ridge - I will have to avoid checking this threadfor updates until I work it out myself. Laughing
  BTrail Beginner

it crossed the creek not to far from the road now that the clime up to the bridge is gone it is hard to find but there is still a bit of it on the buninyong side of the creek
  MOM Chief Commissioner

Location: here, there, everywhere....
I'm having all sorts of problems attaching the map to Railpage.

Here is the link to it in flickr.

edit sorted out the problem.


  hswan Beginner

Hi there, I'm currently doing some research on soil chemistry adjacent to the old Ballarat-Buninyong line, and saw this thread.  Thanks for all the posts, your combinded responses have helped me determine the location and timing of the lines operation.

I'm just wondering if anyone knows what type of sleepers would likely have been used on the line (there doesn't appear to be any left) and whether they were likely to have been replaced at any stage prior to the line being ripped up.

The reason i'm interested, is that my research has identified some interesting trace element trends in the soil on one part of the line, and I'm wondering whether the sleepers might have been treated with some preservative (copper chrome arsenate for example), or did they just use local timber untreated? or ship in red gum?

Any help regarding sleeper use from 1880 - 1940s would be great - I can't find a thing.



Very Happy
  hswan Beginner

Hi there, I'm currently doing some research on soil chemistry adjacent to the old Ballarat-Buninyong line, and saw this thread.  Thanks for all the posts, your combinded responses have helped me determine the location and timing of the lines operation.

I'm just wondering if anyone knows what type of sleepers would likely have been used on the line (there doesn't appear to be any left) and whether they were likely to have been replaced at any stage prior to the line being ripped up.

The reason i'm interested, is that my research has identified some interesting trace element trends in the soil on one part of the line, and I'm wondering whether the sleepers might have been treated with some preservative (copper chrome arsenate for example), or did they just use local timber untreated? or ship in red gum?

Any help regarding sleeper use from 1880 - 1940s would be great - I can't find a thing.



Very Happy
"hswan"


Also, I used to live on Main road just outside Buninyong and the line traveled through the properties behind our house, you can follow it from fisken road, through peoples back yards (it is easy to locate because of the steep cuttings and raised areas) through until it enters the last decent into Buninyong and crosses a couple of bitumen roads on the north side of town.  There are a number of intact brick drains in
the section between Fisken road and Buninyong from memory.  


  historian Deputy Commissioner

Hi there, I'm currently doing some research on soil chemistry adjacent to the old Ballarat-Buninyong line, and saw this thread.[...]
I'm just wondering if anyone knows what type of sleepers would likely have been used on the line (there doesn't appear to be any left) and whether they were likely to have been replaced at any stage prior to the line being ripped up.

The reason i'm interested, is that my research has identified some interesting trace element trends in the soil on one part of the line, and I'm wondering whether the sleepers might have been treated with some preservative (copper chrome arsenate for example), or did they just use local timber untreated? or ship in red gum?

Any help regarding sleeper use from 1880 - 1940s would be great - I can't find a thing.
"hswan"


The VR used untreated timber sleepers. The most suitable timbers were considered - in the late forties - to be red gum, red ironbark, red box, yellow box, grey box, yellow stringybark, yellow gum, white stringybark, and yertchuk (whatever that is :-). In earlier times the VR was even more specific - I can remember only a couple of species being listed as being acceptable. The sleepers would have been replaced a couple of times in the life of the  branch.

The VR did not use preservatives on their sleepers. The quality of the timber available was such that the life of a sleeper was considered to be normally limited by mechanical damage (e.g. spike killing) rather than decay. Hence the use of preservatives made no economic sense. (It is worth remembering that red gum had few commercial uses apart from firewood, sleepers, and charcol.)

However, the VR did undertake tests of preservatives - one around the  late forties used creosote and crude petroleum oil! So you could be seeing the results of a test - but it would be unlikely.

Strange trace elements could be from the use of locomotive ash as ballast. Large quantities of ash were produced as a byproduct of the use of steam locomotives, and it was considered a good ballast where the speed was not too high. However, in the late '20s the ballast on the line was recorded as being gravel (6 inches deep). This would not preclude spot repairs with ash, of course.
  RustyRick Chief Commissioner

Location: South West Vic
Something else to consider is weed spray. Not sure when it started, but VR was still spraying the suburban lines in the early 1980's. I got a nice coating walking the path between Upper Ferntree Gully and FTG. The train was a T, the spray tanker, and a guards van.

Rick
  Rodo Chief Commissioner

Location: Southern Riverina
Arsenic was the preferred weedkiller for the VR.until the 1980s, I think. Thence Roundup or similar stuff was used. Arsenic was about the only thing available in the days of the Bunninyong line.
  Tom68 Beginner

Used to park our trail bikes at what may have been the Canadian station (near Elsworth street) in the late 1970's.

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