Chile news

You must be logged in to reply

  Search thread   Image gallery
1 of 5 2 3 4 5 »
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/6498445.stm

Purge amid Chile transport chaos

Chilean President Michelle Bachelet has sacked four ministers, as
polls suggest falling support for her government.
The last few months have seen protests in the capital, Santiago,
over the introduction of a new transport system.

In a national TV address, Ms Bachelet said her government owed an
apology to Santiago's residents, especially the poor, for the chaos
they have faced.

It is the second big cabinet reshuffle since she took office in
2006. The first one followed student protests.

Increased strain

Speaking on Monday evening, Ms Bachelet said her government was
beginning a new era in which mistakes would no longer be accepted.

Transport Minister Sergio Espejo - one of those removed from his
post on Monday - had been the focus of criticism since the
Transantiago transport system was introduced on 10 February.

With the Transantiago, large areas of Santiago - a city of about 6m
inhabitants - were left almost devoid of public transportation,
forcing people to walk long distances to catch a reduced number of
buses.

The system came under more strain with the start of the school year
at the beginning of March.

The capital's metro system has been unable to cope with the large
numbers of commuters, with reports of people fighting to get on
overcrowded trains.

Emergency rooms

The number of passengers trying to use the underground is said to
have almost doubled, with some 2.2m users in a week.

One person is reported to have died from a heart attack as a result
of the crush, another died after fainting from lack of oxygen.

The authorities have set up emergency rooms to deal with the
increased numbers of cases of fainting due to the lack of oxygen and
higher temperatures.

The transport problems have sparked frequent protests in Santiago's
poorer neighbourhoods, where roads have been blocked with
barricades.

Ms Bachelet - whose popularity rating is said to have fallen to
about 47% - also replaced the justice minister, the defence minister
and her chief of staff.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
A bumpy road for Santiago's transit overhaul
The remodelled system has irked patrons with longer bus waits, packed subways and routes tangled with transfers.

By Monte Reel, Washington Post

Last update: November 17, 2007 – 4:07 PM

SANTIAGO, CHILE - Hardly anyone argued with the overall goal: relieve the transit woes of another growing Latin American city by remodelling the local bus system to complement a recently expanded subway system.
But months after this city's transportation redesign was unveiled, many people cannot even mention its name -- Transantiago -- without rolling their eyes and mumbling in disgust. It has become the focus of the country's largest class-action lawsuit.

A congressional inquiry is trying to figure out exactly how things went so wrong.

"Bad, bad, bad, bad," said Rosana Ramirez, 32, offering a passionate appraisal while waiting for a city bus. "I used to wait five minutes for a bus; now it's 20 or 30. I'd take the subway, but it's so crowded now because no one wants to take the bus. I feel like a sardine on it."

Before Transantiago, South America had become a beacon to many urban planners responding to a vexing international trend: The cities growing fastest around the world are in developing countries that often cannot afford major infrastructural overhauls to relieve congestion.

The Brazilian city of Curitiba was among the first to offer a possible solution, revamping its transit system by focusing on relatively cheap, easy-to-use buses that operate in dedicated lanes.

Bogota, the capital of Colombia, eventually followed with a system based on Curitiba's, and the results were increased public transportation usage, fewer automobiles on the roads and less pollution. Planners from Quito to Beijing were soon flocking to those cities to study what they had done right, and they copied the concepts when they returned home.

"A lot of people assume that the expensive ideas are the most effective ones, but that is simply not true," said Jaime Lerner, former mayor of Curitiba, who is now a well-travelled international urbanization consultant.

"What we proved is that sometimes the simplest solutions are the best ones."

Enter Santiago. About five years ago, planners knew that a transportation upgrade was needed. The privately run buses that traversed this city filled the streets with traffic, noise and pollution.

So officials made the requisite exploratory journey to Colombia and soon announced plans for Transantiago, billed as a Chilean version of Bogota's TransMilenio system.

But instead of focusing on buses, the plan envisioned the subway as the project's spine. The government had separately spent about $1.3 billion to double the subway system's size, an expansion regularly cited as a symbol of Chile's prosperity under former president Ricardo Lagos.

The bus system, according to the plan, would feed the subway routes and greatly improve overall efficiency.

Although the new system has undeniably upgraded the quality of the buses that operate in the city, it reduced the total number of routes.

And despite the strengths of Santiago's subway system -- it is modern, fast and clean -- the new integrated transportation system ignored key elements of the Bogota and Curitiba systems that have proved essential to their success: dedicated bus lanes and easy ways to buy tickets before boarding buses and entering train stations.

Moreover, Transantiago had more complexity of routes, requiring more transfers to reach destinations. Problems with fare cards and contracts plagued the system from the start.

"People were very excited about this plan, because the government said that it was going to reduce the time of their trips to work," said Patricio Lanfranco, with the Santiago-based citizens advocacy group Ciudad Viva. "People thought they were going to have an extra hour in their lives every day. But when we saw the plans, we saw it was obvious this was going to be a catastrophe."

The unfortunate result, say the program's critics, is that a lot of people have given up on public transport altogether.

According to Ciudad Viva, automobile traffic has increased nearly 20 percent in Santiago this year.

Hundreds of commuters have banded together to sue the operators of the system for millions of dollars in losses they claim to have suffered from disruptions in transportation.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
RGI-

Chile: Santiago Metro is planning to raise US$140m next year through an initial offering of bonds to investors on the local market. Issued without government guarantee, the bonds will have a 21-year term.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Chile: On December 10 weekday express services were introduced between Plaza de Puente Alto and Tobalaba on Santiago Line 4. Similar services in the opposite direction were introduced previously to increase morning peak capacity.

RGI
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Santiago Metro has exercised an option for 36 cars under its contract with CAF, which is now to supply the Chilean capital with a total of 20 nine-car trainsets.

RGI
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Faced with losses of more than US$4m a year, Chilean state railway EFE has withdrawn off-peak services on the Biotrén commuter network in Concepción, where trains now operate only from 06.40 to 10.00 and from 16.00 to 21.20. Despite a 14·2% increase in passenger traffic, EFE made a total loss of US$76m in 2007 when it received US$55·1m in support from the government.

RGI
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Santiago metro orders extra trains
05 Jun 2008  

CHILE: Metro de Santiago has exercised an option for a further 36 cars to operate its steel-wheeled Lines 4 and 4A in the Chilean capital.

On June 5 Alstom Transport confirmed that Metro de Santiago had exercised its option to purchase 12 more three-car Metropolis trainsets, which will be delivered at the end of 2009. Total value of the deal is put at €47m.

The stainless-steel bodied cars will be built at the company's Lapa plant near São Paulo in Brazil, with electrical traction package coming from Villeurbanne, Tarbes and Ornans in France. The Saint-Ouen facility will provide the Urbalis automatic train control equipment, and the passenger information system will come from Montréal.

Bogies will be installed locally by Alstom Chile staff after the cars have been delivered to the metro workshops.

Alstom supplied an initial fleet of 60 three-car units for Lines 4 and 4A under a €250m contract awarded in September 2002; these were also built at Lapa. Taking power at 750 V DC, the trainsets are each formed of two driving motor cars and a centre trailer; they can operate as three or six-car trains.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Santiago trackwork
14 Jun 2008



CHILE: Balfour Beatty plc announced on May 14 that its Chilean subsidiary had been awarded contracts worth a total of £37m to undertake tracklaying on two extensions to the Santiago metro. Under a contact worth £10·2m, work on the 3·8 km section of Line 1 from Escuela Militar to Los Dominicos is scheduled for completion in September 2009.

The second contract worth £26·7m covers the 14·2 km of Line 5 from Quinta Normal to Plaza de Maipú, which is also to be operated with rubber-tyred rolling stock. Operator Metro SA says that the first section as far as Pudahuel is due to be handed over in December 2009, with the second phase to Plaza de Maipú opening in early 2010.

'With this contract, we will be looking to further build upon the successes achieved on lines 4 and 4A', said Manfred Leger, Group Managing Director, Rail, at Balfour Beatty. 'The guaranteed presence in Chile for the next three years also gives us the opportunity to grow in South America'.
 
PalmerEldritch Say goodnight to the bad guy

Location: Princes Park, Carlton
Found at: http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,21985,24002918-5012753,00.html

Subway pole-dancer arrested
July 11, 2008 09:19am

A STRIPPER who danced on the poles of Santiago subway trains to challenge the prudishness of Chilean society was arrested overnight during one of her lightning performances.

Monserrat Morilles, 26, surprised subway riders all week stripping to skimpy underwear, but she refused tips.

She said she was protesting a lack of tolerance in Chile, one of Latin America's most conservative societies where the first generation since the Pinochet dictatorship is reaching adulthood.

"This is just a beginning. We are starting an idea here that will grow and be developed further," she said as police and subway guards surrounded her.

The professional pole dancer worked quickly all week to avoid arrest, getting on at one station, finding a subway car with no children on it and stripping in time to exit at the next station.

Chilean media dubbed her "La Diosa del Metro" or Subway Goddess. She called her performances "happy minutes".

"Chile is still a pretty timid country," said her manager Gustavo Pradenas.

"People aren't very extroverted and we want to take aim at that and make Chile a happier country."

Morilles' arrest comes after news that a woman in Romania has been taking busking to a new level, with her saucy pole-dancing on Bucharest subway trains.

Commuters have been subjected to a striptease with the woman stripping to her underwear, before asking the packed train for money.
- A user
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Chile in 2001-

http://www.railways.incanada.net/pictures/talca.htm
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Counting the kilos
20 Nov 2008

CHILE: Metro de Santiago is to install three additional Railweight APC4000 automatic passenger-counting systems alongside seven already fitted.

The equipment works by weighing and identifying individual carriages to calculate the number of passengers on board. An initial survey was carried out to calculate a passenger’s average weight, and this is then used as the basis for the automated measurements.

Each weighing zone consists of a series of transducers mounted on the track, a TSR400 dynamic train weighing processor and an RFID reader. RFID tags identify the cars as they pass over the equipment. These zones are connected to the APC4000 server which then processes the resulting data for use by Metro de Santiago staff.

By knowing the weight of each empty carriage as well as specific seating and standing room, the system calculates how many passengers are on board as the train passes over it.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Thales will supply Santiago metro operator Empresa de Transporte de Pasajeros Metro SA with Scadasoft and automatic train supervision as well as Locktrac 6172 PMI modular interlocking for extensions of lines 1 and 5.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Alstom Transport won a $13.3 million contract from Chilean operator Metro de Santiago to supply an automatic train-control system for a metro line 5 extension. The nine-mile extension will enter service in December 2009. The train-control system will enable Metro de Santiago to reduce intervals between trains.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Systra wins in Santiago
03 Feb 2009

CHILE: Systra has been appointed to supervise construction, testing and commissioning of two extensions on the Santiago metro network.

The 28 month contract covers the 4 km Line 1 extension to Los Dominicos and the 14 km extension of Line 5 to Maipú. Systra has already started verification of the detailed design prior to inspecting installations in April 2009. Line 1 and the first 7 km section of Line 5 are due to be commissioned and operational by December 2009. The final section of Line 5 will follow in December 2010. Further expansion plans are due to be announced shortly by Chilean President Michelle Bachelet.

Alstom has been awarded a €9·5m contract to supply its Sacem ATC for the Line 5 extension, which will allow Metro de Santiago to reduce headways to a minimum of 100 sec. Sacem is already installed on lines 1, 2 and 5.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Alstom ATC for Santiago Line 1 extension
05 Feb 2009

CHILE: Metro de Santiago has awarded Alstom Transport a €5·3m contract to supply, install and commission Sacem automatic train control on the Escuela Militar - Los Dominicos extension which is now under construction. The 3·8 km addition to Line 1 is expected to open by December.

Sacem will allow minimum headways of 100 sec. Sacem is already in use on lines 1, 2 and 5, and in December Alstom was awarded a €9·5m contract to install it on the 14·2 km Line 5 extension from Quinta Normal to Maipú.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Climbing and exploring the tangled streets of Chile's cultural capital
Rebecca Cooney McClatchy-Tribune  

As the tram moves up the steep tracks of Artilleria Hill, I catch glimpses of Valparaiso and its port below. The ride is a mere 5 minutes, and at the top we emerge on a promenade lifted from the late 19th century. It has cobblestones, blossoming trees and a cast-iron railing worthy of Queen Victoria with all its flourishes.

We stand alongside tourists and Chileans, hushed by the view before us. Valparaiso makes a perfect crescent along the Pacific Ocean, the city's famous 42 hills rising behind. To the left lies the harbour. I catch the dim clanking of the port at work. The day is warm, almost hot, but the breeze off the ocean cools. It may be winter back home in New York, but here in Chile, it's summer.

This is my second trip to Valparaiso. I have come with my husband, who hails from this magnificent city. I am enchanted by the glorious remnants of the city's 19th century prominence as the Southern Hemisphere's chief seaport. The port may have declined, but it is still a centre for exporting fruit. Tourism and education have filled the economic gaps. Valparaiso, with only 250,000 residents, has nine universities, hosts numerous arts festivals each year and is increasingly becoming a popular stop for major cruise lines. Incredibly, most cruise passengers opt to tour neighbouring Vina del Mar, a resort town with a casino, manicured gardens, beaches and fashionable shops, over vibrant Valparaiso, with its European architectural gems, tangled streets, cobblestone alleys and elegant old restaurants and bars. Its Old World character has earned Valparaiso the designation as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, a place of outstanding cultural importance.

From our perch 500 feet up Artilleria Hill, my husband proposes exploring the city's corners via its fabled ascensores, funicular trams built near the end of the 19th century. Once there were 29. Today, 15 remain, each leading up a different hill to a different neighbourhood. The one that brought us up here was built in 1893.

The next day we head down to Valparaiso's "plan," the city's lowest level. All along its length are base stations for ascensores. We start in the financial district, where the streets are clogged with trolley buses and the narrow sidewalks with suited men and women. I spot the entrance to Ascensor Concepcion, marked with arching metal letters in an Art Nouveau script. A dark passage leads to the antiquated station, where my husband fishes out 400 pesos and drops the coins into a cast-metal tray. For the equivalent of $1 each, we ride the city's oldest funicular, built in 1883.

After a few more people enter the tram, the door shuts and we begin our passage upward. We pass our twin heading down, equally filled with passengers. Its weight is what pulls us up.

Within minutes we arrive at a cobblestone plaza. Bright pink and orange bougainvillea spills over the ornate cast-iron fence that lines this promenade, Paseo Gervasoni, which overlooks the centre of the city. I turn around and see a row of Victorian mansions painted in gay colours. Around the corner is another walkway, Paseo Atkinson. The modernist poet Ruben Dario lived at the end of this small block. He left his homeland of Nicaragua for Valparaiso when he was 19, thinking that the cosmopolitan city would expand his vision. He called it "francesada y exotica," or French and exotic, and he wrote some of his greatest poems while here in the late 1880s. We stop for tea and sandwiches at Brighton B&B, a huge gingerbread house painted bright yellow. From the black and white tiled terrace, we look out over the port where my husband once worked.

Then we explore the neighbourhood. We come upon a small alley of confetti-collared houses, Pasaje Pierre Loti, named after the French novelist who also lived for a spell in Valparaiso. Purple morning glories drape over the fences, and hanging signs advertise small cafes and bed and breakfasts. It is obvious from the murals covering the walls that the neighbourhood's Bohemian spirit lives on. Stencils and political graffiti pose questions such as, "What have you done for your rights?"

We thread our way up and down staircases that seem to lead nowhere and down through curving, tiny cobbled streets almost too narrow for a car. We find ourselves on yet another old promenade, this one on Cerro Alegre, or Happy Hill, where English and German merchants lived in mansions overlooking the harbour during Valparaiso's Golden Age, before the Panama Canal opened in 1914. We board Ascensor Peral for a short, almost vertical ride down. In minutes, we are back in the bustling downtown for a drink at the elegant Bar Ingles, whose doors opened in 1916.

The next day, we take the Espiritu Santo tram to Cerro Bella Vista, or Hill With a Beautiful View. It is everything its name promises, with a vista of church spires, Victorian houses and the blue Pacific always in the distance. A sign points upward to La Sebastiana, Chilean poet and Nobel laureate Pablo Neruda's house. But the road is steep and my husband says it is a good 20-minute ascent. Another sign points us downward, to the Open Air Museum, a collection of wall murals created by more than 20 Chilean artists. Some are abstract, others realistic, but all are bold. At the bottom we come upon a sparkling mosaic that covers the enclave of a tiny park. Shards of glass spell out Paseo de los Suenos, or Promenade of Dreams. We take a seat next to an older man and rest.

Each day we set out to explore more hills. We discover that some of the trams have closed since our last visit two years ago. A few look shuttered permanently, and at others, improvised signs promise renovations. So we climb up twisting streets and staircases until we reach the stations at the top. We zigzag up to Florida Hill with its hodgepodge of wood houses; Mariposa Hill, where women stand in the doorways of little shops; and Baron Hill at the northern end of the city, which looks over the amphitheatre that is Valparaiso.

My husband saves Ascensor Polanco for last, because it is unlike any of the city's funiculars. Built in 1916, it is a two-part ride that traverses first through a tunnel and then makes a vertical rise. We arrive and find it closed for renovations until 2009. Its ochre tower sits high up the hill linked by a network of cobbled staircases. I take my husband's hand and lead him upward. At every landing, four more staircases lead off in other directions. It is a veritable labyrinth, but I keep the tower in sight. We go up and up and up. And suddenly we are there, breathless and exhausted. We look over the city. The port is far from here, the Pacific even farther. Then we look back over the steps we have climbed. We see cobblestones, little viaducts, sleeping dogs on landings and everywhere a profusion of blooming oleander, camellias and hibiscus. This is Valparaiso.

------

IF YOU GO:

An essential part of meandering through Valparaiso is stopping at any of the many authentic cafes and bars. Here are some suggestions.

WHERE TO EAT. The Mercado del Puerto, an old warehouse, is steps away from the docks (at calles Cochrane and San Martin) and houses numerous seafood restaurants. Some say Gustav Eiffel designed the block-square building. Inside, the building becomes hexagonal, with a lacy, wrought-iron staircase winding up its centre and a skylight that suffuses the space with light. I lunched on the second level at Cafe Viviana. I chose the daily special, which, for $4, included a seafood empanada (empanada de mariscos), fried hake (merluza) seasoned with thyme and parsley and a small glass of a digestive liqueur (bajativo de manzanilla) made from chamomile blossoms.

Restaurante Del Monico (Calle Prat 669) is an old bar and restaurant in the heart of the financial district. Above the long tawny bar hang painted friezes of butchers, bakers and cooks. We could have eaten a three-course meal for about $7 each, but instead had sandwiches of just-cooked chicken and slabs of avocado served on a fresh-baked roll. Lunch for two cost $8.

Bar Ingles (Calle Cochrane 851, near Plaza Sotomayor) opened its doors in 1916 in the heart of the financial district. We had a late lunch, and even at that hour only a few tables were free. Businessmen and artists stood at the mahogany bar drinking wine and pisco sours, Chile's national drink made from sugar, fresh lemon juice and Chilean brandy, or pisco. We found a table and ordered pisco sours, too. They were perfect, not too sour, not too sweet. We followed with a salad of celery and avocado, big enough for two, and I had hake in a cream sauce flecked with small shrimp while my husband ate steak and French fries, totalling $30. The restaurant also is open for dinner.

At the Brighton B&B (Pasaje Atkinson 151-153) we had a glass of wine and plate of olives and cheese on the terrace up on Cerro Concepcion and watched the sun set. The bill came to $10.

Another evening we stopped in el Bar Liberty on Echaurren Square, the city's oldest neighbourhood. The bar opened in 1897 and has always been an old sailors' bar. A parrot squawked at us in the dark foyer. Inside, baseball hats from teams, cities and countries around the world hang over the bar. Banners from the local soccer team, the Wanderers, and photos of the old port line the walls. The bartender served us copitas of wine poured out of a jug. The wine was rough and cheap, the experience rich. The bill was less than $2.

Bar Renato (473 Calle Rodriguez, a few steps off the busy Pedro Montt) is a perfectly preserved relic from the mid-1950s, with private booths upstairs and dominoes and cards downstairs. For dinner my husband ordered the house specialty, chorrillana for two to accompany our pisco sours and game of dominoes. A mass of glistening French fries arrived smothered by beef and onions and topped with a fried egg. It was the ultimate bar food. The total for an evening of drinking, playing and eating was $30.

Cinzano Bar, which dates to 1896, faces out on Plaza Anibel Pinto, a cobbled square with a fountain in its centre. Open for lunch or dinner, it is especially atmospheric after 11 p.m., when octogenarians sing tangos, boleros and other classics to packed tables and standing room only at the bar. We were lucky and snagged a table. I had the machas a la parmesana (a plate of Chilean clams topped with Parmesan cheese) followed by a shellfish stew (mariscal), while my husband had the sirloin steak with salad and French fries. Our bill, including drinks, wine and hours of live music, came to $40.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Las Condes Approves New Light Rail System  
Written by Santiago Times Staff    
Tuesday, 01 December 2009 04:22  
There are more than 400,000 daily trips made through the upper class Santiago borough of Las Condes, and the government plans to add a new means of getting around – a light rail train.  

The municipality approved a proposal to develop the light rail based on a similar system in Barcelona, with studies to gauge demand and cost to begin next April.  Technical evaluations, construction, operation and maintenance of the train’s development will be overseen by the international consortium Alstom-Comsa. The overall cost of preliminary studies and research is about US$1 million.  

It will be the first light rail train system in Santiago in 40 years and its construction is unprecedented in that Las Condes is the first city to take advantage of Chile’s new Law of Urban Shared Finance (FUC). This law permits private sector investors to undertake and profit from initiatives that contribute to the public good.  

The new rail system is estimated to need between 10 and 14 stations. The coming months will be dedicated to estimating how many trains are needed and what routes would be best. Bids for the project are projected to begin Sept. 2010 with construction tentatively scheduled for 2011.  

SOURCE: LA TERCERA
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
http://www.railway-technology.com/projects/barcelona/
images/1-barcelona-tram.jpg
Santiago Times posted this report today (full text):
"Las Condes Approves New Light Rail System
Written by Santiago Times Staff
Tuesday, 01 December 2009 04:22

There are more than 400,000 daily trips made through the upper class Santiago borough of Las Condes, and the government plans to add a new means of getting around – a light rail train.

The municipality approved a proposal to develop the light rail based on a similar system in Barcelona, with studies to gauge demand and cost to begin next April. Technical evaluations, construction, operation and maintenance of the train's development will be overseen by the international consortium Alstom-Comsa. The overall cost of preliminary studies and research is about US$1 million.

It will be the first light rail train system in Santiago in 40 years and its construction is unprecedented in that Las Condes is the first city to take advantage of Chile's new Law of Urban Shared Finance (FUC). This law permits private sector investors to undertake and profit from initiatives that contribute to the public good.

The new rail system is estimated to need between 10 and 14 stations. The coming months will be dedicated to estimating how many trains are needed and what routes would be best. Bids for the project are projected to begin Sept. 2010 with construction tentatively scheduled for 2011.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
On November 6 Metro de Santiago inaugurated San José de la Estrella station, which is located between Trinidad and Los Quillayes on Line 4 and cost US$30m to build.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Metropolis cars arrive in Santiago
18 December 2009  

CHILE: Three Metropolis metro cars arrived in Santiago on December 15, the first of 36 cars being supplied by Alstom to supplement the fleet working steel-wheeled Lines 4 and 4A.

The cars were ordered by Metro de Santiago in June 2008 at a cost of US$48m, as an option on the original US$250m contract for 60 three-car trains placed in 2002.

Clemente Pérez, President of Santiago Metro, and Jean Pierre Fayemendy, General Manager, Alstom Transporte, greeted the vehicles on their arrival at the Puente Alto depot.

Assembled in São Paulo, the stainless steel cars are 22·7 m long and 2 900 mm wide. Traction motors and control equipment have been supplied by Alstom plants in Villeurbane, Tarbes and Ornans, whilst the Urbalis automatic train control was manufactured in Saint-Ouen.

Lines 4 and 4A have experienced significant growth in ridership and are now used by more than 750 000 passengers a day. Following trials at the depot the trains will enter service from March 2010, increasing capacity by more than 20%. Operated in a six-car formation, a complete trainset can accommodate 1 560 passengers, including 276 seated.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Multilateral financial entities and transport experts have long been insisting that Latin America must develop an integrated rail network to increase the competitiveness of its trade and cargo transport sector. For most countries, however, this is a tall order, and many have been unable to carry out the task in the time required.

One good example of a large rail network that has not developed and moved forward as expected is Chile's state-owned rail company EFE, which has historically posted financial losses, and is struggling with debt that is estimated at over 972bn pesos (over US$1.9bn). The company has failed to significantly improve its performance over the last few years despite large investments to extend its network and improve passenger services.

For the first quarter of this year, EFE reported a loss of over 46.8bn pesos, including a US$45.2mn provision to cover damage caused by the February 27 earthquake.

The company is currently operating with four board members, which is the minimum required. The country's public entity authority has yet to announce new directors, which should happen by June, local press reported.

EFE had expected to be working to separate passenger and cargo transport services in 1H10, as part of its efforts to improve both services. However, this process has been put on hold following the earthquake and until the new board members are appointed.

In the meantime, the company is having to focus all its capacity on reconstructing its damaged rail network, which means that the board of directors, despite its limited number, will have to make decisions regarding hiring firms to carry out the works and making investments in this area.

Between 2003 and 2005, EFE carried out an investment plan worth over US$1.1bn. In the last few years, the entity has begun to carry out another plan, at a cost of US$300mn.

Many have spoken about the need to have the state take over EFE's debt and allow the entity to operate without such heavy financial weight on its shoulders. Others believe the firm should be privatized.

Sebastian Piñera's government, however, has not expressed its intentions towards the firm, and has yet to appoint the entity's president. In the meantime, EFE will continue to do what it has done for the last few years: just cope.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Metro to invest US$326mn in new trains - Chile
Friday, May 28, 2010 14:03 (GMT-0400)  

The Chilean transport ministry (MTT) is planning to increase investment in capital Santiago's metro system, local paper Diario Financiero reported.

Recently appointed Metro president Raphael Bergoeing has announced the firm's two-year infrastructure budget, which includes an investment of US$326mn to replace 25% of the system's trains.

Work is also underway on a US$68mn plan to automate the metro. The project is expected to be complete by 2012.

Plans to build the metro's Line 6, which were announced earlier this year by the administration of former president Michelle Bachelet, are still being analyzed.

"Authorities must consider whether now is the right time to move ahead with the project or to postpone it," the paper quoted Bergoeing as saying.

The Line 6 project includes a 15 km underground line and 12 stations, and requires an estimated investment of US$2bn.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Govt considered pushing back Metro line 5 extension, official says - Chile
Tuesday, June 1, 2010 11:19 (GMT-0400)  

Chilean authorities considered pushing back the opening of state-owned Metro company's line 5 extension following the earthquake that hit the country in late February, an official from Chile's transport and telecommunications ministry (MTT) told BNamericas.

Construction work began in 2006 and was scheduled to be completed this year, but fears over possible earthquake damage along the line meant that extensive checks had to be carried out before the inauguration date could be confirmed.

While officials thought the opening would have to be pushed back to 2011, Metro's high construction standards and safety measures prevented any damage to works along the line, the official said.

President Sebastian Piñera met with Metro's president Raphael Bergoeing on May 31 to announce that the line's extension would be inaugurated in December of this year as originally planned.

Metro has already completed 75% of the US$628mn project, which will connect the system to the capital's Maipu district.

The line's 14.2 km extension was divided into two phases, the first of which involved 5 new stations and was opened earlier this year. The extension will comprise another seven new stations along an 8.6 km stretch.

The expansion will allow line 5 to handle 330,000 passenger trips per day, and is expected to contribute to the decongestion of line 1, which suffers from overcrowding during peak hours.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Govt considered pushing back Metro line 5 extension, official says - Chile
Tuesday, June 1, 2010 11:19 (GMT-0400)  

Chilean authorities considered pushing back the opening of state-owned Metro company's line 5 extension following the earthquake that hit the country in late February, an official from Chile's transport and telecommunications ministry (MTT) said.

Construction work began in 2006 and was scheduled to be completed this year, but fears over possible earthquake damage along the line meant that extensive checks had to be carried out before the inauguration date could be confirmed.

While officials thought the opening would have to be pushed back to 2011, Metro's high construction standards and safety measures prevented any damage to works along the line, the official said.

President Sebastian Piñera met with Metro's president Raphael Bergoeing on May 31 to announce that the line's extension would be inaugurated in December of this year as originally planned.

Metro has already completed 75% of the US$628mn project, which will connect the system to the capital's Maipu district.

The line's 14.2 km extension was divided into two phases, the first of which involved 5 new stations and was opened earlier this year. The extension will comprise another seven new stations along an 8.6 km stretch.

The expansion will allow line 5 to handle 330,000 passenger trips per day, and is expected to contribute to the decongestion of line 1, which suffers from overcrowding during peak hours.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Metro line 6 faces new delays - Chile
Thursday, June 3, 2010 17:14 (GMT-0400)  

The Chilean government may further postpone the project to build line 6 of capital Santiago's state-owned metro system over financial, technical and political issues, a Metro official said.  

Changes in the government's spending plan due to the need for reconstruction following the February earthquake, as well as concerns surrounding demand for the new line, have led the government to reconsider the project, work on which was originally scheduled to begin in July.

Transport minister Felipe Morande said earlier this week that new soil use and engineering studies for the project were being carried out, and would be ready in about two months.

The need for the new metro line has also been called into question due to its links with the Ciudad Bicentenario urbanization project, announced during the government of former president Ricardo Lagos. The project, to mark 200 years of Chilean independence, has not been completed and is currently being re-evaluated. If the project is altered or cancelled, this could invalidate the passenger projections for line 6, the official said.

The US$957mn project to build Line 6 was one of the last initiatives announced under the administration of former president Michelle Bachelet. The project was scheduled to conclude in end-2014, when Chile's next presidential elections will take place.

President Sebastian Piñera has been critical of the project since its announcement in December of last year, saying that construction of line 3, designed to connect northern Santiago to the rest of the system, should be prioritized. Bachelet's government argued that in order to carry out line 3, the system first needs to decongest line 1, which is what line 6 was designed to do.

Line 6 will cross the capital city from southwestern district Cerrillos to eastern district Providencia, benefitting some 1.2mn inhabitants of districts Cerrillos, Las Condes, Santiago, San Miguel, San Joaquin, Ñuñoa, Pedro Aguirre Cerda, and Providencia.
 

You must be logged in to reply

  Search thread   Image gallery
1 of 5 2 3 4 5 »
 
Display from: