AirBrushes

 
  brod13 Assistant Commissioner

Location: Norske Skog, Tasmania
Hi all.

I'm in the market for a new one, just want to know who uses them and what sort.

On Fleebay, there is a lot of cheap-o ones, in which i have one now. Should i go this way again or get a half decent one, but can you tell the difference?

Also, is there any good ways of cleaning them? I normally just run thinners though them.

REgards, Brodie

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  bjviper Chief Commissioner

Location: Brisvegas
I have a Paasche F (similar to a H) siphon feed single action airbrush. This is my basic airbrush for large single colour jobs.

I also have a Runway13 AB-134BKX set. Double action, gravity feed. Great for painting small fidly parts, and weathering too. It was pretty good value, I think about $140. Compare it to an Iwata which come in at $300 plus.
  jezzbott Chief Train Controller

Location: Victoria
I have somewhere one for $25 and apparently its ok,
Give me a day or so ill reply again

I found it because i need one to!

Cheers
Mark
  a6et Minister for Railways

I purchased a Paasche H series from a place in Newcastle at a very good price, & I am more than happy with it, as it uses both bottles & cups, the kit comes with a good set of parts.

He does not advertise them anymore, but still has spare jars  web address is http://www.duanesplanes.com.au, worth an email if interested.

Hobby tools has both the H & VL set for $169.00.

Ensure you get a good sized air compressor to keep up a good supply of air.
  jezzbott Chief Train Controller

Location: Victoria
Just read the article....
Super Cheap Auto has one $25 bucks and a modeller i know says there better then the big expensie brands,

Cheers
Mark
  Wee_pierre Junior Train Controller

Location: Adelaide
I have a Paasch H series and have owned it since 1970 something and have replaced the needle assembly once in that time . I also fitted some pick up spouts to floquil lids so I can change onto floquil bottles. Unlike some of the other expensive brushes the Paasch brushes mix the air and paint external to the body of the brush so no complex disassembly to clean. If I had to buy another one I would buy the same but with a comprehensive spares list I can replace anything that need to.  Very Happy
  steve4painting Locomotive Driver

Location: New Zealand
you can't go wrong with an Iwata AirBrush...
  a6et Minister for Railways

Just read the article....
Super Cheap Auto has one $25 bucks and a modeller i know says there better then the big expensie brands,

Cheers
Mark
"jezzbott"


Basically I started out with a similar type, & while they are ok, since moving to the Paasche I will not go back to the cheap ones. In fact I have two of the cheaper versions, both different brands from different places, as the first one failed I needed another, so down to Super Cheap or Bunnings.

What I found is that the cheaper ones have a non standard bottle thread, as well as the tube fittings are also non standard, & it means that you have to have adapter fittings with them.  & that was the very thing that I found with the two brands, both had different sized fittings, & even the air brash connector to the lid were different, as were the lid & har thread.


Wee_pierre  What are the pick up spouts you are talking about as Floquil are my main paints used?
  GreatSouthern Junior Train Controller

For painting models I wouldn't even think about anything but a double action brush, whatever the brand.  Double action means that you have seperate control over the paint flow as well as the air.  Mine is a Badger 150 that I've owned for about 30 years and still gives good service.  I press a button on top to get the air flowing and then pull the same button back to progressively increase the paint flow.  I would respectfully suggest that it would be impossible to paint around, e.g. all the brake gear on the end platform of a Victorian VHGF without this seperate control over the paint.  Reducing the paint flow allows you to get into all the little nooks and crannies of the brake cylinders and their supporting brackets without getting big gobs of paint and runs on the upper surfaces.   Same applies to tricky situations like getting around and behind the smoke deflectors and air compressor on a locomotive like a VR K class.  
With a single action brush you just press the button and you'll get air and paint at the same time with no control over the paint flow other than an adjustment of the nozzle via a little knurled collar or similar.
Like anything else to do with modelling, if you want to get good results you need to be prepared to invest in good tools.  Yes, it is an investment and careful slection before you spend will yield dividends in professional results.
Happy painting.
  TheBlacksmith Chief Commissioner

Location: Ankh Morpork
Just read the article....
Super Cheap Auto has one $25 bucks and a modeller i know says there better then the big expensie brands,

Cheers
Mark
"jezzbott"


Well, there are several modellers here that will tell you otherwise. Cheap airbrushes produce cheap results. And there is little point in buying a cheap airbrush then having to go and buy a better one some years later when you discover that the cheap one was not up to scratch.

My advice would be to invest in a good brush right from the start, they really do produce much better results, and you can get spares for them for ages after. I started off with a Badger but changed to a Paasche VL, and as Great Southern says, double action is the best way to go.
  Aaron The Ghost of George Stephenson

Location: University of Adelaide SA
I have a Sparmax DH-103, a superb airbrush and I would not be without it.
  GreatSouthern Junior Train Controller

One more thought.  With bicycles you get to choose two (and only two) from light, cheap and durable.  I supect with airbrushes it's easy to use, cheap, reliable; choose two.
  robertc Chief Train Controller

Brodie, one important point in choosing an airbrush is deciding if you are going to spray water based paints (e.g. Polly scale,Tamiya). If you are make sure your airbrush can gravity feed (that means a colour cup can be placed above the barrel of the airbrush). I have three airbrushes and they all work perfectly for thinners based paints. The one that doesn't work well for water based paint only sucks paint up from a bottle under the barrel of the airbrush. That one is a Badger I purchased in the 1970's.
regards
Bob Comerford
  a6et Minister for Railways

Brodie, one important point in choosing an airbrush is deciding if you are going to spray water based paints (e.g. Polly scale,Tamiya). If you are make sure your airbrush can gravity feed (that means a colour cup can be placed above the barrel of the airbrush). I have three airbrushes and they all work perfectly for thinners based paints. The one that doesn't work well for water based paint only sucks paint up from a bottle under the barrel of the airbrush. That one is a Badger I purchased in the 1970's.
regards
Bob Comerford
"robertc"


The Paasche H set has such a cup, & I never have any issues spraying Acrylics, such as Polyscale, Badger etc, I mainly use Isopropyl Alchohol (rubbing alchohol) for thinning.
  BL2 Chief Train Controller

I have a model master airbrush....I think they are known as Aztec, always advertised in the U.S. magazines made by Testors.
It is a double action brush,easy to use..no dismantling to clean and works well too, very adjustable and works good at low pressure too. I decided to try Badgers Modelflex paint  a long time ago and the brush does a terrific job with the water based stuff as well as your regular Humbrol and Floquil. I have replaced the nozzle as the old one only lasted about 12 years! and you can buy three different types of nozzles for different results, they simply screw on to the front of the airbrush body. Very Happy
  Mansfield Deputy Commissioner

Location: Melbourne
I have a Badger 175 (Crescendo), which I have used to spray the contents of a large layout, including all structures, track and rollingstock, all with Modelflex paints. But every colour change requires cleaning out the inards, as I don't like to cross-contaminate my paint bottle colours.

I agree that being able to control air and paint separately and produce a fine atomisation is great with internal mix, double action brushes.

After 4 years, I had to replace the nozzle ($10) only, as it is aluminium and flares around the needle.

Although I own both 150 & 175 Badgers, I'd be interested to play with the Paasches for ease of cleaning.

$0.02 = spend $150 on a quality airbrush and you will be satisfied for life.  Very Happy
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
Actually looking at it from the point of view of a purchase, I reckon about $150 for a airbrush is pretty good value, considering even a new Basix loco will be $185 dollars, how many loco's and carriages etc would it paint in a few years! It would probably pay for itself in about 12 months so it is a good investment!
  Bigglesof266 Beginner

Newb to the forms here. G'day all. Not to airbrushes though.

I own and use a double action Badger and an Iwata, both cup feed. The Badger is 25 years old, the Iwata 20. Never used Paasche, but they have a good rep.

IME there is no substitute for a quality airbrush, and double action is a must. You can get all the replacement parts for Badger and Iwata. I have fine, medium and coarse heads and needles for my Badger, and replacement seals are never an issue. You won't get that nor the fine tolerances with your externally cloned Super Cheap unit. The Iwata is actually a small cabinet maker's gun. It's used for the larger surface area jobs, but is very versatile. It is a magnificent piece of kit. Personally, and although you do pay for them, I think Iwata is the finest. However, there's nothing shabby about Badger either.

Essential IMV are a proper compressor with reservoir and water trap. These days, they are so inexpensive, there's absolutely no-one who can afford an airbrush or loco who won't be able to afford one. This is where a cheap Chinese clone unit can be substituted.

A good result is labour intensive, and that means cleanliness. I don't know of any airbrush which doesn't require cleaning after each use if you want to preserve it in good running order and obtain the best results from the job. Loathsome job, but it goes with the territory. One can cheat by running thinners through it and changing colour if continuing on task consecutively. But at the end of the day it still requires a thorough dissassembly and clean, or at any time the interval is such that the paint starts drying in the unit. This is material dependent, but I don't foresee polyurethanes or two packs being used in model rail applications?

No need to use your best paint thinners for cleaning. Cheapest bulk GP thinners compatible with the paint type (acrylic, enamel, etc) being used is fine. The key to 'easy' cleaning is don't be stingy with the thinners -yes I know it's expensive which is part of why materials costing for any good paint job costs- and clean immediately you have finished the job.

So in summary. double action, pay for a Paasch, Badger or Iwata and you won't go wrong, compressor with an air filter is a must, keep it clean and realise materials including plenty of thinners for cleaning to effect a quality paint job is gonna' cost.

Cheers,

Bigglesof266
  Shazam75 Chief Commissioner

Location: Brisbane
What if I only intend to use it to spray say about 20 wagons in my life time?  Is it still worth spending so much money on an airbursh that will sit dorment after I have finished with it?  I ask because I have just put together a couple of SEM wagons and looking to buy a beginners one
like this one

http://www.brunelhobbies.com.au/runway13/runway13ab.html

the AB-101A External Mix Airbrush Se

Will this be OK to start with ?
  TheBlacksmith Chief Commissioner

Location: Ankh Morpork
What if I only intend to use it to spray say about 20 wagons in my life time?  Is it still worth spending so much money on an airbursh that will sit dorment after I have finished with it?  I ask because I have just put together a couple of SEM wagons and looking to buy a beginners one
like this one

http://www.brunelhobbies.com.au/runway13/runway13ab.html

the AB-101A External Mix Airbrush Se

Will this be OK to start with ?
"Shazam75"


Sigh, see all the preceding posts. The posters have spent 2 pages up until now telling you that it is best to spend well on a double action, internal mix air-brush of good quality.

Why spend $22 on a bottom of the range air-brush, then discover it is no good, then spend another $150 on a good one, when you could have started off with the good one in the first place?

Getting a good quality brush and learning how to use it will serve you well.
  bjviper Chief Commissioner

Location: Brisvegas
What if I only intend to use it to spray say about 20 wagons in my life time?  Is it still worth spending so much money on an airbursh that will sit dorment after I have finished with it?  I ask because I have just put together a couple of SEM wagons and looking to buy a beginners one
like this one

http://www.brunelhobbies.com.au/runway13/runway13ab.html

the AB-101A External Mix Airbrush Se

Will this be OK to start with ?
"Shazam75"


You will do more than 20 wagons in your life Exclamation  If you're really hell bent on spending small, I would get the AB-119 basic set (CDE-AB-119) for $59bux. Internal mix double action siphon feed and it will last longer than that $22 one. You may as well start with a double action now, rather than single action, then have to relearn when you upgrade to double action.
  a6et Minister for Railways

What if I only intend to use it to spray say about 20 wagons in my life time?  Is it still worth spending so much money on an airbursh that will sit dorment after I have finished with it?  I ask because I have just put together a couple of SEM wagons and looking to buy a beginners one
like this one

http://www.brunelhobbies.com.au/runway13/runway13ab.html

the AB-101A External Mix Airbrush Se

Will this be OK to start with ?
"Shazam75"


Sigh, see all the preceding posts. The posters have spent 2 pages up until now telling you that it is best to spend well on a double action, internal mix air-brush of good quality.

Why spend $22 on a bottom of the range air-brush, then discover it is no good, then spend another $150 on a good one, when you could have started off with the good one in the first place?

Getting a good quality brush and learning how to use it will serve you well.
"TheBlacksmith"


It gets frustrating at that! Confused

Let me say this regarding that air brush set.  First off it is identical to my first air brush, even down to the tiny little air hose & connectors, as shown in the illustration.  

That whole kit is designed to work with cans of compressed air, note the seperate cap with thread, & its size also the thread sizes of the air brush itself as well as on the hoses.  As such they are very much exclusive to that set, & totally incompatiable with anything else.  The cans of air do not last long & you then have to source replacements from somewhere, a very expensive exercise.

I found the brush itself & the job it does is so so, but is small in the hand, the connectors to the bottles are not very good & they easily become detached, whilst working.  I have adapted the hose to fit onto a constance supply mini air compressor & use it to blow dust out of my computer, & it only just does that. If I lose it, it will be no lose.

Similar air brush sets are available that can be used with proper air compressors owing to the amount of adapters with it, & can be sourced at cheaper prices.

You can get cheap Paasche branded air brushes such as basic VL sets which are far better, but I would not get anything less than the H set.

An air brush is not just used to paint a set amount of wagons, but I find that many & varied uses for one, in many different areas, & not just in my MR setting either.

Get a decent one to start with & it will last. Many others have said to get the double action types, & whilst I am happy with my single action, I would not rule out a double action in the future though.

I have one other cheap air brush that has jars that fit the Paasche jars & that is the only benefit from that, as I have spare jars.

In the end its your money, & therefore your choice as to what to do with it, in the same way that it is your choice as to what choice you make, you asked for advice, & you have been given some excellent advice from many experienced modellers, so its just a matter of whether to accept or reject it all.  

If you are thinking of rejecting the advice, before you do so, ask yourself did you want real advice or just want to hear what you wanted to hear, that is to justify what you are going to do anyway.
  Harley Junior Train Controller

Location: Clergate, NSW
If you really are only going to paint that many wagons in your entire modelling career, why not consider cans of spray paint?

I use an airbrush for most things, however i do sometimes use spray paints for the odd job.

Tamiya have a wide range available from many hobby shops and tHey provide a more then acceptable finish.

Just ensure you clean the models well and prime them first. The cans of automotive primer sold at Supercheap Auto are great for models and are reasonably priced.

Harley.
  Shazam75 Chief Commissioner

Location: Brisbane
Ok - thanks I think I will take your advice and get a more quality one and specifically one of the name brands.

Cheers
Shelton.
  Bruiser Beginner

Hi a6et,

Please correct me if I wrong but isn't the Paasche H set only a single action airbrush whereas the VL set double action?

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