Brazil High Speed

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Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

Here we go again!
 
National ground transport agency ANTT has pushed back the launch of a tender to operate the 33.1bn-real (US$19.4bn) Rio-São Paulo-Campinas bullet train until June.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
A decree to formalize the creation of Brazil's new federal high-speed public transport authority, Etav, will be published in the week beginning June 11.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

Here we go again-
 

Brazil, through its growth acceleration plan (PAC), will launch a tender on October 30 to build and operate the Rio-São Paulo-Campinas bullet trainestimated at 33.2bn reais (US$16.5bn), according to the federal government's fourth PAC II balance report.

 
 
 
 
Phase I of the initiative entails hiring the builder and operator of the line and phase II involves furnishing infrastructure and rights for the commercial operation of stations and adjacent areas.

To prepare for the tender, a notice regarding public hearings is scheduled to be published on August 23, the report said.

 
The start of the bidding competition, however, will not take place until May 30 of next year with the signing of a concession contract scheduled for October 30.

 
National ground transport agency ANTT will select the operator that offers the largest canon payment based on the number of passengers transported per kilometer.

 
The high-speed rail project includes a 22bn-real financing package through national development bank BNDES, of which the rail operator will have access to some 5bn reais to purchase equipment. The loan will be repaid in local currency to reduce the currency exchange risk.

 
A number of foreign consortiums are reported to be interested in bidding to operate the train, including companies such as AlstomSiemensHitachiMitsubishiToshiba, Hyundai, Samsung and Bombardier.

 
The 511km train route will run through the cities of Campinas, Guarulhos, São Paulo and São José dos Campos in the state of São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, Volta Redonda, and Barra Mansa in Rio de Janeiro state.


 
awsgc24 Minister for Railways

Location: Sydney
It will be great news if we can have a third continent with High Speed Rail.
- GeoffreyHansen


According to July RGI, Morroco in Africa is to have an HSL. That's 4.
Also South Africa has the fast Gauteng line.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
Several mining operations could be negatively impacted by Brazil's Rio-São Paulo-Campinas bullet train, including ones producing minerals as gold, kaolin, clay, bauxite, granite, limestone and sand,
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

Brazil's government has announced the revival of a $16.5 billion high-speed railway project that would link Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo.

The National Agency of Terrestrial Transport, or ANTT, published the details of the process for awarding the contract on Thursday. The process will include a public consultation phase, giving people until Sept. 24 to make their "suggestions."

Interested companies will have until April 30, 2013, to submit their bids, which will be opened a month later.

The bidding process will be divided into two phases.

The company or consortium that will manufacture the trains and run the system will be selected first and then a contract will be awarded for building the railway lines, stations and the remaining infrastructure needed for the train's operation, the ANTT said.

The agency estimates the total cost of the project at 33 billion reais ($16.5 billion).

The project was first announced nearly four years ago and initially formed part of the preparations for Brazil's role as host nation of the 2014 soccer World Cup.

But three previous bidding processes were declared void after the interested companies rejected certain demands of the Brazilian government, which insisted on keeping fares low.

The most recent attempt to get the project off the ground was made in July 2011.

Companies from South Korea, France, Spain, Japan and Germany have thus far shown interest in the project to build the 510-kilometer (315-mile) high-speed rail line connecting Brazil's two largest cities.

In recent months, Spanish officials have informed Brazil's government that they will promote the participation in the auction of companies such as Ineco and Renfe, which have vast experience in high-speed rail transport.

Authorities estimate that the bullet train, which would be the first of its kind in Latin America, would transport some 33 million people in its first year of operations and as many as 100 million in 2030.

Experts say the project is complex because it would involve construction of 90.9 kilometers (56 miles) of tunnels and another 107.8 kilometers (67 miles) of bridges and viaducts to traverse the rivers and mountainous terrain that separate Sao Paulo from Rio de Janeiro.

The revival of the project was announced a week after the unveiling of an ambitious 133 billion reais ($65.5 billion) plan to improve Brazil's infrastructure and spur the country's sputtering economy.

The plan, which will involve awarding private firms concessions for the construction of nearly 7,500 kilometers (4,660 miles) of highways and 10,000 kilometers of railways, is aimed at improving links between productive areas and the country's seaports and airports.

President Dilma Rousseff said in announcing the plan on Aug. 15 that Brazil has become the world's sixth-largest economy despite a lot of "bottlenecks" that must be removed to put the country on a path to "accelerated and sustained" growth.

Transport Minister Paulo Sergio Passos said that same day that a new public company would be created to auction a license for the high-speed rail line linking Rio de Janeiro Sao Paulo

Eike Batista, Brazil's richest person, expressed interest in the latest investment plan, saying "Brazil has barely invested in infrastructure over the past 20 years and therefore this 'mega-package' will be fantastic for the country and for business leaders." EFE

 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW
New tender rules set out by Brazil's national ground transport agency ANTT to operate its 33.2bn-real (US$16.3bn) Rio-São Paulo-Campinas bullet train will likely make contenders from China ineligible
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW


BRASILIA, Brazil (AP) — Brazil says it expects the country’s first high-speed bullet train will link three cities in 2018.



The $16.5 billion, 317-mile (510-kilometer) line will connect the cities of Sao Paulo, Campinas and Rio de Janeiro.



Bernardo Figueiredo is president of the government’s Planning and Logistics Agency and he says the first competitive bidding for manufacturing the trains and operating the system is scheduled for May. A second bidding process for the laying of tracks, the construction of stations and other infrastructure projects is scheduled for early 2014.



Figueiredo says only foreign companies will take part in the bidding ‘‘since there are no Brazilian companies in condition to take part in a project of this kind.’’



Figueiredo spoke to foreign correspondents on Friday.

 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed

Brazil has revived its proposed BRL33bn ($16.5bn) high-speed railway project that would link Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo.

The 317 mile high-speed rail line will connect the cities of Sao Paulo, Campinas and Rio de Janeiro with scheduled completion in 2018.

The bidding process for the project will be divided into two phases which include a public consultation phase, allowing people to offer their suggestions by 24th September and bidding phase.

The interested companies will have to submit their bids by 30 April 2013.

Short listing of bidders to build and operate the trains will take place on 29 May 2013 while the bidding to carry out the related infrastructure work for the project will take place in early 2014.

According to the Brazil's National Agency of Terrestrial Transport (ANTT), the company or consortium that will build the trains and operate the system will be selected first and later a contract will be awarded for building the railway lines, stations and the remaining infrastructure needed for the train's operation.

So far, companies from South Korea, France, Spain, Japan and Germany have showed interest to build the high-speed rail line.

Upon completion, the rail line would transport about 33 million people in its first year of operations and is expected to increase to 100 million by 2030.

The project was first announced four years ago as part of infrastructure project in the run up to 2014 Soccer World Cup.

But earlier attempt to bid the project failed as interested companies bidding for the project rejected some demands by the Brazilian government with last bidding held in July 2011.

The project involves construction of 90.9km of tunnels and another 107.8km of bridges and viaducts to traverse the rivers and mountainous terrain that separate Sao Paulo from Rio de Janeiro.

The revival project follows the unveiling of BRL133bn ($65.5bn) infrastructure investment plan to improve the country's roads and railways over the next 25 years.

Main aim of the contract is to build up to 8000km of new roads as well as 10000km of rail lines to improve links between productive areas and the country's seaports and airports.

 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

ON AUGUST 23rd Brazil's government announced the rules under which it intends to auction a proposed 511 km high-speed rail link between São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro next year. It has tried, and failed, to find bidders three times in the last couple of years: companies with experience in high-speed rail say that its estimate of how much the line will cost to build—34 billion reais ($17 billion)—is far too low, and that ridership predictions—33m journeys in the first year of operation rising to 100m by 2050—are also wildly optimistic. The cheapest tickets will be 200 reais one-way, which is out of reach for most Brazilians, since it is more than a quarter the minimum monthly wage. Businessfolk do indeed fly between São Paulo and Rio in large numbers, and would presumably be willing to spend a good deal more than this (return flights booked at short notice can easily cost 1,500 reais). But it seems hard to believe there are enough of them to make the numbers add up.

The auction may go ahead this time, because the government has changed the rules since the previous failed attempts. Earlier this year it accepted that taxpayers, not contractors, would have to bear a good chunk of the risk of cost over-runs, low demand and sharp currency movements (the project requires international participation, since no Brazilian firm has experience in high-speed rail). On August 23rd it made another concession to attract bidders: among the criteria for choosing the winner will be bidders' estimates of costs. Those with the lowest estimates are most likely to succeed. Which implies, at least, that the government has finally accepted that its own cost estimates are perhaps not the last word.

But if the government does manage to pick a winner, for the Brazilian taxpayer it may be a case of fourth time unlucky. Everywhere, new-build rail projects are horribly likely to come in way over budget and to be used much less than expected. A 2009 paper by Bent Flyvbjerg of Oxford’s Saïd Business School, ominously entitled "Survival of the Unfittest: Why the worst infrastructure gets built—and what we can do about it", presents data on predicted and actual costs and ridership for 58 rail projects around the world. On average, costs ended up 50% above predictions, and ridership 50% under. For some complex rail projects—and Brazil's bullet train is certainly that, since high-speed rail requires precision engineering, and it will run through valleys and mountains—the figures were even worse. The Channel Tunnel linking Britain and the European mainland, and the Great Belt Rail Tunnel linking two Danish islands, both ended up costing around double the initial budget.

Most of Brazil's roads are unpaved. Some important routes—including some interstate highways—are single-lane and extremely dangerous. Half the population is not connected to the sewage system. There are few (ordinary) commuter or freight rail lines, and they are mostly in very poor condition. Urban mass transport is grossly deficient: São Paulo, a metropolis of nearly 20m souls, has a mere 71km (44 miles) of metro, plus a few overland urban rail lines, which at peak hours are all terrifyingly overcrowded. The government is planning to start on some of these backlogs, but even if it goes full speed ahead, catching up will take decades. It is so easy to think of a long list of more worthwhile infrastructure projects in Brazil that it is hard to understand why this one is not dismissed out of hand.

 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

Brazil has revived its proposed BRL33bn ($16.5bn) high-speed railway project that would link Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo. The 317 mile high-speed rail line will connect the cities of Sao Paulo, Campinas and Rio de Janeiro with scheduled completion in 2018.

The bidding process for the project will be divided into two phases which include a public consultation phase, allowing people to offer their suggestions by 24th September and bidding phase.

The interested companies will have to submit their bids by 30 April 2013.

Short listing of bidders to build and operate the trains will take place on 29 May 2013 while the bidding to carry out the related infrastructure work for the project will take place in early 2014.

According to the Brazil’s National Agency of Terrestrial Transport (ANTT), the company or consortium that will build the trains and operate the system will be selected first and later a contract will be awarded for building the railway lines, stations and the remaining infrastructure needed for the train’s operation.

 So far, companies from South Korea, France, Spain, Japan and Germany have showed interest to build the high-speed rail line.

Upon completion, the rail line would transport about 33 million people in its first year of operations and is expected to increase to 100 million by 2030.

The project was first announced four years ago as part of infrastructure project in the run up to 2014 Soccer World Cup.

But earlier attempt to bid the project failed as interested companies bidding for the project rejected some demands by the Brazilian government with last bidding held in July 2011.

The project involves construction of 90.9km of tunnels and another 107.8km of bridges and viaducts to traverse the rivers and mountainous terrain that separate Sao Paulo from Rio de Janeiro.

The revival project follows the unveiling of BRL133bn ($65.5bn) infrastructure investment plan to improve the country’s roads and railways over the next 25 years.

Main aim of the contract is to build up to 8000km of new roads as well as 10000km of rail lines to improve links between productive areas and the country’s seaports and airports.

 
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed

Brazil is once again seeking bids for its floundering TAV high-speed rail project. With potential bidders reluctant to get involved up until now, Chris Lo wonders if the project's latest attempt to find its feet will be any different.



Originally planned to be operational in time for the 2016 Olympic Games, Brazil's $16.5bn Trem de Alta Velocidade (TAV) high-speed rail project has so far been struggling to even get out of the starting blocks. Over the past few years, the project's numerous false starts have led to speculation that Brazil's high-speed ambitions have withered and died on the vine.

But earlier this month, the Brazilian Government resurrected its plan to build a new high-speed line from capital Rio de Janeiro to Campinas via São Paulo, Brazil's largest city.

"Potential bidders are sceptical that the project can be built for the $16.5bn that Brazil has proposed."
The bidding for the manufacturing of trains and the operation of the 511km high-speed line is set to begin in May 2013, with the contract for building the project's tracks, stations and other infrastructure split off into a separate contract, reportedly scheduled for bidding in early 2014.

However, after the project's failure to attract bids from the private sector on three separate occasions during the last few years, there's still a shadow looming large over TAV's prospects. Without any high-speed rail expertise or experience of its own, Brazil is relying on major investment from high-speed specialists from countries such as Spain, Germany, France, South Korea or Japan, to provide the technology transfer necessary to push the project forward.

So what's been keeping the private sector, usually so quick to bid for major infrastructure projects like this, so reticent? On the most fundamental level, potential bidders are sceptical that the project can be built for the $16.5bn that Brazil has proposed, and the government has previously stipulated that the burden of cost overruns will fall to the project's major contractors.

With the line's route passing through mountainous regions and supporting infrastructure such as roads and highways in relatively poor condition, costs will almost certainly escalate at a rapid rate. An estimated 90km of tunnels and more than 100km of bridges and viaducts add to the project's complexity.

As well as concerns about the project's upfront costs, doubts have also been raised about the projected ridership of the completed TAV line. According to official estimates, the line will serve 33 million passengers in its first year of operation, rising to 100 million by 2030. But with the service's cheapest one-way tickets priced at 200 reais (nearly $100, or a quarter of Brazil's monthly minimum wage), the TAV will be financially out of the question for most of Brazil's population, leaving a lot of pressure on the country's white-collar workers to make up the necessary numbers.

So if the project's calls for tenders have previously fallen on deaf ears, what has changed in its latest attempt to attract foreign contractors?

Well, Brazil's National Agency of Terrestrial Transport (ANTT) a few months ago acknowledged the financial risks for companies coming on to the project, offering to help shoulder the risk of cost overruns with public money, as well as finance 60% of the value of the contract.

"With the cheapest one-way tickets priced at 200 reais, the TAV will be financially out of the question for most of Brazil's population."
Splitting the contract work into two sections could also help the project get off the ground, allowing the lower-risk train manufacturing contract to get underway first. This means that ANTT would launch its second call for bids once the project is already underway, providing some much-needed legitimacy when the higher-risk construction contract bids are sought in 2014.

The difficulty Brazil has experienced in finding foreign investors for its high-speed project underlines the challenges involved in planning a high-speed rail project of any kind, let alone one as complex as TAV taking place in a country with little to no domestic expertise.

It remains to be seen how the project progresses and how it performs once completed, but with more favourable contract terms now on the table and interest being shown by Siemens and Spanish manufacturers Ineco and Renfe, things might finally be looking up for a project that once seemed destined for the political back-burner.

 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed



Brazil’s planned $US16.3 billion high-speed train is a step nearer reality. The national ground transport agency ANTT has begun a consultancy period to help prepare tenders to build and operate the line. This aims at collecting feedback to improve bidding processes which will include building the railway, providing rolling stock and subsequently operating and maintaining the system. Seven public hearings are scheduled to take place in September. Actual bidding is not expected to start before May 2013, and it is hoped to sign a concession agreement by October. The route covers some 511km, connecting Rio de Janeiro with Campinas by way of  Guarulhos, Sao Paulo, Sao Jose dos Campos,Volta Redonda, and Barra Mansa.


 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed

Hyundai has received approval from the Brazilian Government
  12.11.2012  


Hyundai has received approval from the Brazilian Government to submit a bid for the proposed BRL33bn ($16.5bn) high-speed railway project that would link Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo and Campinas. According to a report by financial daily Valor Economico, the government has relaxed the requirement for prospective bidders from ten years' experience of operating high-speed rail to five without accidents. Hyundai has eight and a half years of high-speed train experience. The 317-mile high-speed rail line will connect the cities of Sao Paulo, Campinas and Rio de Janeiro with scheduled completion in 2018. Interested companies have to submit their bids by 30 April 2013 and, so far, the local subsidiary of France's GEC Alsthom, Germany's Siemens, Japan's Mitsui and Spain's CAF and Talgo have expressed an interest. The company or consortium that will build the trains and operate the system will be selected first, followed by a contract awarded to build the railway lines, stations and the infrastructure needed for the service's operation, according to Brazil's National Agency of Terrestrial Transport (ANTT). The project involves the construction of 90.9km of tunnels and 107.8km of bridges and viaducts to traverse the rivers and mountainous terrain that separates Sao Paulo from Rio de Janeiro. The rail line would reportedly transport an estimated 33 million people in its first year of operation; a number which is expected to reach 100 million by 2030. The proposed high-speed train, running at 174mph, would reduce the travel time between Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo to 80 minutes, compared to six hours by car or bus, according to Railway Technology.


 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed

Hyundai has received approval from the Brazilian Government to submit a bid for the proposed BRL33bn ($16.5bn) high-speed railway project that would link Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo and Campinas.

According to a report by financial daily Valor Economico, the government has relaxed the requirement for prospective bidders from ten years' experience of operating high-speed rail to five without accidents. Hyundai has eight and a half years of high-speed train experience.

The 317-mile high-speed rail line will connect the cities of Sao Paulo, Campinas and Rio de Janeiro with scheduled completion in 2018.

Interested companies have to submit their bids by 30 April 2013 and, so far, the local subsidiary of France's GEC Alsthom, Germany's Siemens, Japan's Mitsui and Spain's CAF and Talgo have expressed an interest.

"The 317-mile high-speed rail line will connect the cities of Sao Paulo, Campinas and Rio de Janeiro."
The company or consortium that will build the trains and operate the system will be selected first, followed by a contract awarded to build the railway lines, stations and the infrastructure needed for the service's operation, according to Brazil's National Agency of Terrestrial Transport (ANTT).

The project involves the construction of 90.9km of tunnels and 107.8km of bridges and viaducts to traverse the rivers and mountainous terrain that separates Sao Paulo from Rio de Janeiro.

The rail line would reportedly transport an estimated 33 million people in its first year of operation; a number which is expected to reach 100 million by 2030.

The proposed high-speed train, running at 174mph, would reduce the travel time between Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo to 80 minutes, compared to six hours by car or bus.

 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed

PRESIDENT Dilma Rousseff of Brazil, speaking today at the 81st General Assembly of the International Union of Railways (UIC) in Paris, told delegates that the first phase of the Brazilian high-speed project will be announced tomorrow.  


  This involves the selection of a consortium to equip and operate the new line, ahead of awarding a contract for the civil works.
 

The project, which has suffered numerous set-backs, involves building a high-speed line Rio de Janeiro, to São Paulo and Campinas.


 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed

Tendering starts for Brazilian high speed line

14 December 2012



 


 


BRAZIL: On December 13 federal transport agency ANTT announced the start of tendering for the planned 510 km high speed railway between Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo and Campinas.

Bidders have been given until August 13 2013 to submit their proposals for the operation and maintenance of the route, preceded by the supply and installation of electrification, telecommunications, signalling and train control systems, as well as noise abatement measures.

Financial bids are due to be opened on September 19 2013. Once the system specifications have been selected, it is expected that the construction of the new line will be the subject of a separate tender.

The start of tendering had been announced by President Dilma Rousseff in her address to the 81st General Assembly of the UIC in Paris on December 12. More tendering was to follow in 2013, she said, as Brazil looked to build 10 000 km of new railways over the next 30 years at a cost of R$91bn.


 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed

THE Brazilian National Transport Agency (ANTT) has issued a call for tenders for Brazil's inaugural high-speed rail line from Rio Janeiro to São Paulo and Campinas. Prequalification bids will be accepted up to August 13 2013 for the supply of technology and to operate the 350km/h line, with a winner set to be announced on September 19 2013.  


  The initial tender encompasses operation, maintenance and upkeep of railway systems for 40 years as well as the supply and installation of soundproofing, electrification, telecommunications, signalling and train control systems. ANTT will hold meetings to clarify the announcement in São Paulo on January 29 and March 19 2013. A separate tender to construct the line will be issued in 2014.
 

ANTT says it has revised the terms of the tender by splitting it in two and increasing the public stake in the consortium to 45% from 30% previously to reduce the risk to the international consortia likely to bid. Two previous tenders for the project were abandoned in 2010 and 2011 due to a lack of interest. The Brazilian president Ms Dilma Rouseff made building the line a top priority for her administration and the government is keen to avoid a repeat of the unsuccessful tenders in order to complete the project by 2020.

The winning bidder will invest an estimated Reais 7.7bn ($US 3.71bn) in the project, offer economy-class tickets for no more than Reais 200, and cover the 418km between Rio and São Paulo in less than 1h 39min. Mr Bernardo Figueiredo, ANTT executive director, says he anticipates that 40 million people will use the service in its first year of operation, rising to 100 million by the end of the concession in 2060.

He added that the government will pay for its part of the construction costs through the fees the operator will pay the state, which will be set at a minimum of Reais 70.38 for each kilometre travelled, totalling more than Reais 27bn over the course of the concession. He said the winner of the contract will be the bidder which offers the highest fees to the government and a design that costs the least to build.


 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed

Bidding Opens for Brazil High-Speed Rail Project

16.12.2012 14:48
        Section:        Railway transport

Brazil’s National Transportation Agency (ANTT) has opened bidding for the Rio – Sao Paulo high-speed rail line.

The tender includes the operation and maintenance of the route for  the next 40 years as well as the installation of soundproofing,  electrification, telecommunications, signalling and train control  systems.

 

The closing date for proposals has been set for August 13, 2013.

The 510 km Rio – Sao Paulo line was originally proposed to begin  operation in time for the 2014 World Cup, but unsuccessful bidding  competitions in 2010 and 2011 have pushed back the completion date for  Brazil’s first high-speed line to 2020.

http://www.rail.co


 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed

BRAZIL's National Development Bank (BNDES) announced on January 18 that it will invest up Reais 6.6bn ($US 3.17bn) in the 511km high-speed line from Rio de Janeiro to S?o Paulo and Campinas.




BNDES has pledged up to Reais 5.37bn, based on a December 2008 calculation, although this does not include taxes and corrections, which make the final sum significantly higher. The loan has a 30-year term with an annual interest rate of 1%.


Bidding is currently underway for the 40-year contract to equip, operate, and maintain the line. A separate construction tender will be let next year.


 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed






Viability studies are in progress for high speed rail through Brazil’s south-eastern states of Sao Paulo and Minas Gerais, as well as the southern state of Parana. Effectively these projects – totalling a fraction under 2,000km – will be extensions to the $US17.4 billion Rio-Sao Paulo-Campinas project, currently out to tender. Altogether three new lines are under consideration. One of these is to link the city of Sao Paulo with Curitiba, capital of Parana state. The other two lines will connect Campinas in Sao Paulo state to Belo Horizonte in Minas Gerais state, as well as the Triangulo Mineiro region of Minas Gerais.


 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

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Brazil’s Federal Public Prosecutor MPF has filed two cases against the national ground transport agency (ANTT), citing alleged irregularities in the tender process for the $US17.4 billion Rio-Sao Paulo-Campinas high speed rail concession. While not calling the project itself into question, MPF’s action prevents construction starting until the technical and legal issues are sorted out. MPF queries the stated “privatisation” status of the project, pointing out that a state-run company is to be formed to partner with the winning bidder, with the state responsible for building infrastructure and providing “significant loans” for the project. The resolution, says MPF,  permits the infrastructure that will be built to be transferred to the federal government – but this would supersede Brazil’s current law relating to concession. Companies interested are seen to be Hyundai and Samsung, Alstom, Siemens, Bombardier , Hitachi, Toshiba and Mitsubishi.


 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
EPL, Brazil's national logistics and planning group, has extended the deadline to submit bids for a tender to supervise the contractors building the BRL35.6bn ($18bn) Rio de Janeiro-Sao Paulo-Campinas high-speed rail project from 23 April to 14 May 2013.
According to EPL, which launched the tender, the extension will help in changing the criteria for judging technical proposals to seek greater balance and efficiency for those qualifying.
BNDES, Brazil's national development bank, will provide around 60% of the financing for the project, which is part of the country's national acceleration plan (PAC) launched in 2006.
The proposed 418km rail line is expected to operate trains at a top speed of 350km/h between Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo and Campinas by 2020.
"The extension will help in changing the criteria for judging technical proposals to seek greater balance and efficiency for those qualifying."
The bullet train will cover seven stations, including stops at international airports Guarulhos in São Paulo, Viracopos in Campinas and Antonio Carlos Jobim in Río de Janeiro.
The Brazilian National Transport Agency (ANTT) issued a call for tenders to bid for the operation, maintenance and exploitation of the project in December 2012.
Prequalification bids will be accepted up to 13 August 2013, while the winner is set to be announced on 19 September 2013.
Work will include the design of the high-speed system, maintenance of the railway systems for 40 years and the supply and installation of soundproofing, electrification, telecommunications, signalling and train control systems.
The winning bidder will invest BRL7.7bn ($3.71bn) in the project, provide economy-class tickets for no more than BRL200 ($100) and ensure that trains cover the 418km route in less than 1h 39min.
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
on April 23, 2013in EuropeBecause of its complexity, the $US18 billion Rio-Sao Paulo-Campinas high-speed rail project is being developed in segments by several contractors. In addition to the railway itself, various tunnels, bridges, stations, yards and car parking facilities are involved. The original deadline to submit bids for a tender to supervise the contractors working on the project was changed from 23 April to 2 May and has now been altered again – this time to 14 May. It has been explained by the national logistics and planning group EPL, which launched the tender, that postponements were necessary “to change the criteria for judging technical proposals in order to seek greater balance and efficiency for those qualifying.”
 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed
Official: Spain can offer Brazil turnkey high-speed rail
Brasilia, May 21, 2013 (EFE via COMTEX) -- Spain's development minister said here Tuesday that Spanish companies were prepared to meet all expectations for the high-speed rail Brazil wants to build.

"We're able to not only do the structure, but also do the superstructure, the electrification systems, the security systems and the rail-traffic control systems," Ana Pastor said after a series of meetings with senior officials in Brazil's infrastructure sector.
   

During each of those gatherings, Pastor reiterated Spain's interest in competing for the project to link Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo via high-speed rail.

The auction to select the operating consortium for the project, currently the country's most significant in the infrastructure sector, will be held in September.


Pastor said the public-private consortium that will register for the auction will be unveiled in "the coming days" and she underscored Spanish companies' ability to compete in each of the phases.

"A very big effort has been made in Spain for decades to have one of the world's largest high-speed rail networks" with "trains of proven efficiency" and "outstanding human capital," she said.

She also said the Spanish bid will include guarantees of "stable financing and the corresponding endorsements," as was the case in bidding for construction of a high-speed rail between the Saudi cities of Mecca and Medina, awarded in January 2012 to a Spanish consortium.

On the final day of her third visit to Brazil since last June, Pastor also touted Spain's experience in ports and airports.

Brazil currently is carrying out multi-million-dollar projects to expand and modernize all of its airports, particularly those serving the 12 host cities of next year's FIFA World Cup.

One of those metropolises is Rio de Janeiro, which also will host the 2016 Olympic Games. EFE ed/mc
 

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