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Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

From Kiwi Rail “Express”:

KiwiRail is on target to complete new track arrangements and rolling stock needed for the significant boost in volumes we will carry for Fonterra in the bottom half of the South Island from later this year. The increase follows the decision by Fonterra to establish a new storage facility on the former Fisher and Paykel site at Mosgiel, similar to the very successful Crawford St site in Te Rapa.

The facility will be fully rail served with an existing siding being upgraded and additional track being added to the site. Further south, work is also underway at the Edendale dairy factory where a new rail connection and storage yard are being built on the north of the site to cater for the increased volumes following the new 28 tonne an hour dryer launched earlier this year.

All these works are due to be completed by the end of August, with new rail services from Edendale to the new storage facility and then on to the port in Dunedin for export due to start in September.

Our Hillside workshops are also busy preparing an additional 12 IA class wagons from disused VRB's to bring the additional product from Edendale, and are refurbishing previously laid up UK and ZG wagons to provide the 24 extra UK wagons required to move export container volumes out of Mosgiel.

A further 60 specialised curtain sided containers, similar to the TSDs currently used at Edendale, are also being made but with modifications to make them even more user friendly. It is expected these will be brought into service in November once the final fit out has been completed in Dunedin.

Meanwhile Fonterra hopes work can begin on its new milk processing plant near Darfield in Canterbury as early as January next year if it can gain the necessary resource consent approvals. The Midland line runs along one boundary of the 500-plus hectare site on which it proposes to build a milk powder drier which would be operating by second half of 2012 and KiwiRail is in discussions with Fonterra about possible rail connections to the factory. While it is too early to say what will eventuate there are certainly opportunities for us, in terms of bringing in not only milk but also coal to fire the plant, and taking out the finished product for export, says Relationship manager – Fonterra, David Brinsley.

Canterbury is the fastest-growing dairying region in New Zealand, producing about 15 per cent of the country’s milk for export and growing at a rate of more than 5 per cent annually. At present milk collected in the area is being trucked to Clandeboye in South Canterbury. The dairy giant expects consent hearings for the new factory, its first development from scratch in 15 years, to begin in October.

 
Cogload Train Controller

Location: Ooop North

From the Kiwirail "Express":

Barley Business

Even if they are not drinking our beer, it could still

have New Zealand ingredients – and now even

more KiwiRail involvement.

KiwiRail has recently gained the direct business

with Malteurop, the world’s leading malt supplier.

We will be expanding our grain hopper wagon

fleet to 13, to move barley from their Ashburton

storage facility to their malting plant at Marton,

from where they supply both New Zealand and

international brewers.

KiwiRail Mechanical Services are currently

converting five CA coal wagons to CG grain

wagons for the business. The work involves

fitting the wagons with hungry boards, a platform

and roll back tarpaulin, and weather proof seals.

Malteurop is a world leader in the malt industry

and the leading supplier to the brewing industry,

with 23 plants and a production capacity of

2,200,000 tons across 12 countries.

Our southern hemisphere location makes New

Zealand ideally situated to conduct ‘off season’

barley breeding activities and trials for their other

global operations, and new strains of barley

have been developed that are in demand for the

new generation ‘pure’ beers.

 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

From the Waikato Times - 03 August 2010

The prospect of massive aggregate trains shuttling between Waikato quarries and Auckland to feed the supercity's appetite for road and construction materials has been dampened by a new freight study.

But it shows an expected jump in demand for Waikato aggregate in the next few years could put pressure on road networks from heavy trucks hauling from the region's northern quarries to Auckland.

The study's most optimistic assumptions predict the Auckland region's demand for aggregate from Waikato quarries will reach one million tonnes per year by 2015, and two million tonnes per year by 2030.

Environment Waikato commissioned the study to investigate whether rail could be a viable alternative to road transport and mitigate the pressure on roads from hauling far higher tonnages of aggregate north.

However, the comparison showed under most scenarios rail would still be more costly than road transport, and that the advent of heavier truck payloads on roads could offset some of rail's environmental advantages.

New regulations allowing heavier and longer trucks on roads could reduce road costs by up to 20 per cent.

Three half-kilometre, 42-wagon trains from Huntly daily could transport 1.9 million tonnes of aggregate a year. By comparison, one million tonnes of aggregate a year by road would fill up to 140 truck-and-trailers per day.

The study estimated a current annual shortfall of 341,000 tonnes between Auckland's own production and its demand for road and building aggregate, almost three-quarters of it needed south of the harbour bridge.

Increased production from Auckland is constrained by likely consent issues, increasing demand from Huntly quarries which already truck north 150,000 tonnes of aggregate a year despite cost disadvantages of distance.

It estimated moving aggregate by road costs about 11c/tonne/km – and to shift material from Huntly quarries to a plant or depot at Wiri or Southdown, 76 km or 87 km by road, would cost $8.50-$9.60 per tonne.

Moving one million tonnes by rail, excluding infrastructure, was estimated at $8.10 per tonne by KiwiRail.

But when delivery away from the central distribution centre was considered, road was still cheaper despite environmental costs such as congestion and emissions adding between $1.10 and $1.35 per tonne to the cost.

Quarries in the Huntly area had to compete with quarries further north with much lower transport costs.

A concrete plant or combined distribution depot could be built in industrial areas at Southdown or Wiri.

Ad Feedback The draft study concluded that for rail to be a viable alternative to road for hauling aggregates to Auckland, direct connection between quarry and the rail network was essential to cut out intermediate handling costs.

Where access was not feasible, as was likely with existing Huntly quarries, rail was more costly than road.

Environment Waikato manager of transport policy Bill McMaster said given the report's findings it was unlikely further investigation would proceed. A meeting next week of industry and local government stakeholders would consider the report and decide whether to support further work on the issues it raised.

 
disco_mart Station Master

Has the costing taken in damage to the fragile roads around that part of the Waikato (the area I grew up in).  Large trucks on many of the roads around there would be very dangerous indeed.

 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed

Has the costing taken in damage to the fragile roads around that part of the Waikato (the area I grew up in).  Large trucks on many of the roads around there would be very dangerous indeed.

- disco_mart

It never is.

 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

Things could get busier around Christchurch if new logistics park developments stimulate increased demand for rail freight movements.

KiwiRail stands to gain further Christchurch container business as a result of additional land being purchased for the CityDepot facility of Lyttelton Port of Christchurch (LPC) and new plans for a nearby transport and logistics park announced by Arcus Developments.

Described as a “strategic investment”, LPC last month acquired 7.3 hectares of industrial land adjacent to its inland port operation. This purchase is expected to eventually deliver a 70% increase on the current 7,000-container capacity of CityDepot, which is located six kilometres from the seaport in Woolston.

Envisaged as one of the largest projects seen in Christchurch in recent times, the new Arcus “Portlink” development is also expected to expand available “hub” space adjacent to the seaport to 40 hectares. It is being marketed as suitable for third-party logistics, distribution, freight-forwarding and services businesses needing sites of up to 5,000 square metres, and has been supported by LPC.

KiwiRail Southern Regional Manager Richard Priddle hopes the developments will present opportunities to further grow what has already proven a blossoming area of business.

“Over the past season, we have introduced a shuttle service between

CityDepot and the port container terminal. We are doing three shuttles each way per night,” he says.

“We are also providing three shuttles between Middleton and Lyttelton, and

in between these are up to four shuttles from Temuka to CityDepot. As a

consequence, our container volume to the port has doubled to an average of about 14% of their entire container business.

“We’ve developed a very good commercial and operational relationship over the past two years, which is proving of mutual benefit to both businesses. The port company is keen to get as much volume as possible on rail in order to reduce truck congestion at the port.”

LPC is due to this month complete an expansion of its terminal to lift capacity from 16 to 24 wagons, and by November complete a similar expansion at CityDepot.

 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

INLAND PORT EXTENSION GOOD FOR RAIL

Any extension by Port of Tauranga – or any other port company - of the inland port concept in other parts of the country is likely to have positive flow on effects for KiwiRail.

At the weekend, Port of Tauranga confirmed it is considering establishing inland ports in the Waikato and Manawatu. It is understood to be looking at a site in the Manawatu and considering whether to partner with Tainui in the Waikato or establish its own site.

KiwiRail Freight General Manager, Rail Operations, Aaron Temperton confirmed that there have been discussions with Port of Tauranga and others with an interest in inland ports.

“It’s only at a very early stage,” he said. “But the establishment of inland ports is a positive development for our business.”

Tainui has been working on plans for an inland port and commercial hub on 300 hectares of land at Ruakura near Hamilton.

Port of Tauranga Chief Executive Mark Cairns said that if the port had not set up MetroPort at Penrose in Auckland 11 years ago, “we would still be a little regional port”.

MetroPort is a rail and road distribution hub through which around 118,000 containers were distributed in the last financial year.

Mark Cairns says MetroPort has created a 700 percent increase in Port of Tauranga’s container business. He said one of the reasons behind the decision to investigate taking the concept to other parts of the North Island is the port’s belief that the number of international container ports

in the country is likely to reduce.

He said the transport industry had to be organised in advance to move freight from the heartland to ports as quickly as possible to meet the mega-container ships he believes will soon be calling.

 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

Rail only feasible for aggregates if connected to quarries

A study prepared for Environment Waikato indicates that if rail is to be a feasible option for moving aggregate to Auckland from Waikato quarries, rail would need a direct connection to the quarry.

The study was commissioned to establish the extent to which rail could be an option for moving aggregate, used for building roads and on construction sites.

It was carried out by Richard Paling Consulting in association with other consultants.

The study showed that demand for Waikato aggregate is likely to grow in coming years, putting pressure on the roading network. The most optimistic forecast was for aggregate from Waikato quarries to reach one million tonnes a year by 2015 and two million tonnes by 2030.

Three 42-wagon trains a day from Huntly carry 1.9 million tonnes of aggregate. In comparison, it would take 140 truck and trailer units a day to carry 1 million tonnes.

“Although the costs of the line haul for rail are less than those for road transport, there are a number of other costs associated with loading and

unloading the trains,” the study concluded “These would result in the total costs of movement by rail being higher than those associated with movement by road, typically, by a substantial margin.”

Environment Waikato’s manager of transport policy Bill McMaster says given the report’s findings, the investigation is unlikely to go any further.

Meanwhile, Hamilton City Council has turned down the first application for a heavy truck to drive through the city. The council’s transport committee

has declined a heavy permit application from Winstone Aggregates for a vehicle carrying material to a roading contractor.

Transport committee chairman Dave Macpherson said the committee decided to turn down any applications until they knew the potential damage of having trucks up to 9 tonnes heavier than the present limit and who was going to pay for it.

"We have said to staff don't bring those (applications) to us until these studies have been done," he said.

Under the Government's new Vehicle Mass and Dimensions Rule introduced on May 1, operators of trucks weighing more than the approved 44-tonne limit must obtain permits from every affected road

controlling authority before they hit the road.

NZTA has approved 29 of 156 applications for heavier vehicles operating on state highways in the Waikato and Bay of Plenty since the rule was

introduced. Nationally 58 permits have been approved.

 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

WINTER MILK OVER

With our winter milk business now finished, the focus is now moving to the coming summer season which is looking likely to start in the lower North Island later this month.

Slow grass growth because of cold weather will mean a later start to

the season is likely this year, says Palmerston North based performance

specialist Allan Adams. “As of yesterday we were advised there would be no Milk Services until the 20 August,” he says.

However the winter milk season has gone very well, with Waikato staff

having done an excellent job, Allan says.

Our fleet of OM wagons were put to good use moving milk from Longburn to Morrinsville and then Hamilton and to Christchurch, with more than 8 million litres moved.

During this time the Palmerston North team has been running an extensive

work train programme, with concrete sleeper lays on The Milk Route and

supporting WRRP programme between Mckays Crossing and Waikanae.

 
Cogload Train Controller

Location: Ooop North
From the Kiwirail Express:

Boom time for South Island Freight

KiwiRail’s South Island freight business has entered a peak period of activity, with the start of significant new trade developments combining
with considerable growth in existing cargo flows.
Having last year commissioned a specially-built siding off the Midland Line near Rolleston to accommodate Westland Milk Products’ milk
powder and butter consignments from Hokitika, KiwiRail this week also began moving the customer’s bulk milk from Rolleston to the
Hokitika processing plant.

KiwiRail Southern Regional Manager Richard Priddle says a total of about 50 million litres of bulk milk are expected to be handled on the
daily seven-day-a-week service, which this year will expand from 60,000 tonnes of milk powder and butter to upwards of 80,000 tonnes.
However, during this 40-week season at least, Richard says the volume loaded into the services’ ten LXM tankers will be limited to ensure the bridge capacity on the Hokitika Branch Line is not exceeded. These bridges, whichwill be inspected by engineers during the season, are likely to be upgraded in the next few years to make the line capable of carrying 16.3tonne axle loads.

Pike River Coal also this week began railing its second consignment of coal to Lyttelton Portof Christchurch for export shipment. The 20,000-tonne parcel will be accommodated in KiwiRail’s existing South Island coal train programme of up to eight coal trains consisting of 30 wagons per day. Richard says he expects the full consignment will be moved within
a week to a week-and-a-half.

Furthermore, Fonterra this week railed its first milk powder for the season from Edendale to Port Otago. With the recent opening of Fonterra’s new Taieri storage facility near Mosgiel, Richard expects this trade will grow from the140,000 tonnes handled last season to 380,000 tonnes this
year.As a consequence, KiwiRail has added a train between
Edendale and either Port Otago or the Taieri facility-- bringing
the 15-wagon service up to three trains per day, seven days
per week -- as well as introducing two additional shunt services between Taieri and Port Otago.
 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

Wellington, Aug 23, 2010 (ABN Newswire) - Pike River Coal Limited (NZE:PRC) (PINK:PKRRF) has commenced railing coal from its rail loadout facility at Ikamatua on the South Island's West Coast to the Port of Lyttelton in preparation for its second export shipment of premium hard coking coal.

Pike River's inaugural export shipment of 20,000 tonnes of premium hard coking coal went to India in February 2010. That shipment was worth approximately NZ$3.3 million.

Chief Executive Gordon Ward says one train will run from Ikamatua to Port Lyttelton daily for the next few days, increasing to two trains per day in the latter half of this week.

"Our second export shipment, also 20,000 tonnes, is again destined for the same life-of-mine customer, Gujarat NRE (ASX:GNM) and is worth approximately NZ$6 million - significantly more than the last coal shipment due to higher coal prices.

"Our coal will be loaded onto a panamax vessel at Port Lyttelton. The vessel's current expected time of arrival at Lyttelton is 4 September 2010."

 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed

A goods train is blocking train tracks north of Waikanae after derailing this afternoon.

The incident happened at 1.30pm, KiwiRail spokesman Nigel Parry said.

The cause of the derailment was not clear and KiwiRail would investigate what had happened.

The train was still blocking the track and would possibly affect rail services planned for this evening but replacement coach services would be provided if necessary, he said.

The goods wagon stayed upright but caused some issues with traffic when it scattered gravel across the adjacent road, a police spokesman said.

 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed

Taranaki is on Fonterra's radar as a location for a new storage hub.

The dairy giant wants to establish another three hubs in New Zealand's prime dairying areas.

Visiting Taranaki last week, Fonterra general manager, group supply chain, Joe Coote, of Auckland, said the province was one of the possible locations for a new hub, perhaps with an extension to its big manufacturing site at Whareroa, near Hawera.

The company's new hub in Hamilton for product manufactured in the Waikato and Bay of Plenty is integrated with the KiwiRail network and removes 65,000 truck movements a year from the region's roads. Planning is also under way for a hub at Mosgiel.

Mr Coote said most of the product manufactured in Taranaki was shipped from the ports of Tauranga and Auckland, but a small volume was still shipped from New Plymouth and some from Napier.

"We decided last year it was more efficient to move Taranaki product through Tauranga and Auckland, and we're happy with that strategy, which has realised the efficiencies we were targeting."

Ships left Auckland and Tauranga daily for overseas and the company wanted to send products away to customers each day.

"An extra day sitting in a container waiting for a ship is a day our product is not sitting on a shop shelf or in a customer's fridge. The retailer values the product on its shelf life."

More than 90 per cent of the two million tonnes of dairy products Fonterra makes in New Zealand is shipped over the equator.

Although products from New Zealand were hugely popular overseas, international customers could easily choose to buy from competitors located around the corner, he said.

"There's no free ride for New Zealand. We all need to work together to get produce from our farms across the world more efficiently, and get more money in farmers' pockets."

Fonterra was discussing strategies with other exporters because better use of rail and shipping would reflect the company's co-operative spirit, as well as being good for the company and for New Zealand, Mr Coote said.

Fonterra saw the inland port at Wiri in South Auckland as an opportunity for exporters to work together, he said.

Taking product by rail to Wiri to be put in containers and railed to a port reduced truck movements, making the country's roads safer and reducing the company's carbon footprint.

"We're absolutely supporters of rail. It's good for us and for other exporters."

Mr Coote said the more the rail infrastructure was used, the more the unit cost reduced.

"There are efficiencies to be gained for New Zealand if we all work together. More support of rail and inland ports would attract more ships to New Zealand, allowing product to get to international customers more efficiently."

Mr Coote said that if the talks were unsuccessful, Fonterra would consider establishing a hub in Australia, using trans- Tasman shipping, although it preferred to ship product directly from New Zealand.

 
Cogload Train Controller

Location: Ooop North

Ref Taieri:

http://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/130276/fonterra-export-train-first

"The first train laden with milk powder which is expected to leave North Taieri this morning also carries a huge significance.

The seven- or eight-carriage train will carry the first milk powder taken by rail for export from Fonterra's new $69 million storage and transit facility.

It will take about 224 tonnes of milk powder from the former Fisher and Paykel plant site to Port Chalmers in containers, which will be stacked on a ship to be sent overseas.

Confirming the details yesterday, warehouse manager Tim Eketone said the "movement" was a significant milestone for the farmer-owned dairy co-operative.

Storing, and moving by rail, milk products from the North Taieri site would save money, boost local employment and save wear and tear on local roads.

The 120 daily truck movements through Mosgiel would be cut by about 80% when train movements peaked at about four trains a day, Mr Eketone said.

There were 26 operations staff, mostly forklift drivers, at the site, and another five already working for Fonterra in Dunedin would join the coolstore, Mr Eketone said.

The first train also heralds the completion of the coolstore and railway sidings in Fonterra's staged redevelopment of the old Fisher and Paykel plant on Stedman Rd.

The warehouse, for product from Fonterra's Edendale and Stirling factories, can store 17,000 tonnes of cool storage.

Its dry product capacity was unavailable yesterday.

Plans to extend the coolstore were still being discussed, Mr Eketone said.

The co-operative in February floated the idea of turning the hub into an inland port for importers and exporters, to make use of improved rail lines and significant regional storage.

It would mean containers full of imported products would be emptied on the site so the containers could be refilled with dairy products for export."

 
Cogload Train Controller

Location: Ooop North

And more traffic on offer over the Marton - New Plymouth line?

http://www.wanganuichronicle.co.nz/local/news/inland-container-terminal-is-all-shipshape/3925469/

The enterprise of three Wanganui businesses has found an ally with Port Taranaki to see the creation of an inland container terminal in Wanganui's industrial belt.

Expected to be operational in about a month's time, the inland port will see the mothballed Castlecliff rail branch line back in service and thousands of containers transported to the New Plymouth port.

Initial projections have 3000 high cube containers moved from the Balgownie facility in the first year, but Port Taranaki expects that to increase to at 10,000.

And the port company was also hoping to piggyback the growing log trade through the city as well.

The inland port has been pulled together by principals of Molten Metals, Port Taranaki and Ali Arc Logistics and KiwiRail.

Port Taranaki is leasing a block of land, between Heads Rd and Gilberd St, that is owned by Molten Metals. The branch line runs between that land and Ali Arc Logistics warehouse on Heads Rd, which is the storage facility for milk powder produced at the Open Country factory further along Heads Rd.

Olaf Numssen, commercial manager for Port Taranaki, said milk powder production was a catalyst for the creation of the inland container terminal here.

In the peak of the season, Open Country is producing about 160 tonnes of milk powder daily.

Currently it has about 6300 tonnes of powder stored in the Ali Arc Logistics warehouse.

Mr Numssen said the terminal would be know as Westgate Wanganui, picking up on the Westgate name already branding the New Plymouth port facility.

Currently milk powder is trucked from the factory to the warehouse where it is loaded into containers and then trucked to the railhead on Taupo Quay.

But under the new regime containers will be stored at the new terminal, loaded from the warehouse and then hoisted on to rail wagons by a 75-tonne mobile container crane and ferried by rail to Port Taranaki.

Brendon Bartley, manager of Ali Arc Logistics, said they expected the branch line to be operating within about a month and they expected physical work to start on the line next week.

Bruce Tunbridge, Molten Metals owner, said Open Country was the key to the deal and having the warehouse and rail line side-by-side was ideal.

More room was available if it was needed in future and it would not only be handling Open Country dairy product.

The terminal would also operate as an empty container depot, which meant containers could be upgraded on site.

"The advantage of that is importers and exporters can drop off any sort of container here and we can upgrade to whatever standards are required, rather than going back to a port like New Plymouth or Wellington to be upgraded saving a huge amount in transport costs," Mr Numssen said.

He said his company already had commitment from one shipping company to use the Wanganui terminal once it was running and there were others lined up to be involved later.

"Port Taranaki is dealing with the logistics while KiwiRail is providing the rail transport."

He said he was aware Palmerston North had been talking up its chances of creating an inland port but he said the influence of Open Country and Ali Arc Logistics had been decisive, along with high land prices in that city.

"We were targeting Open Country as a major exporter so it came together from that," he said.

Mr Numssen said Port Taranaki was also hopeful of getting petfood manufacturer Mars Corporation on board, shipping export product from its Castlecliff plant.

"Once the momentum starts, others will come on board because we have been talking to producers about this project.

"Wanganui provided the opportunity that we couldn't afford to lose and it provides options to expand the in future," he said.

"What we can do here could easily expand to other commercial interests well beyond this region. We have budgeted on Open Country's container numbers first, but that could double really quickly.

"The volume is there, but it's just the matter of capturing that market."

Mr Numssen said Port Taranaki had been actively pursing new customers since it lost a big portion of the output from dairy giant Fonterra.

"But the upside is we've gained a good amount of Australian cargo and our turn around as a transtasman port is hard to beat. We're now targeting anyone in the lower North Island who trades with Australia."

The biggest growth through New Plymouth lately had been with logs and the company was looking at a fivefold increase in that traffic.

Deputy Mayor Dot McKinnon said the council had been working on the concept for about six years and saw it as an economic opportunity that would spread well beyond the city's borders.

Mrs McKinnon said it will take a significant amount of heavy traffic off the district's roads as well.

"We've been talking to KiwRail and Port Taranaki for about six years to get this going. But it wouldn't have happened without the brokering done by Open Country, Molten Metals and Ali Arc Logistics," she said.

"These guys brokered the deal and it's going to be great for Wanganui."

 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed

Thats good news for kiwi rail, I wonder if they will reinstate the 3rd leg of the triangle at Aramoho to allow trains to run direct without having to cross the  river twice to reverese at East town?

Now all we need is for another inland port in the Waikato and for the port authorities to demand the reopening of the SOL to service it.

 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed

The first train laden with milk powder which is expected to leave North Taieri this morning also carries a huge significance.

The seven- or eight-carriage train will carry the first milk powder taken by rail for export from Fonterra's new $69 million storage and transit facility.

It will take about 224 tonnes of milk powder from the former Fisher and Paykel plant site to Port Chalmers in containers, which will be stacked on a ship to be sent overseas.

Confirming the details yesterday, warehouse manager Tim Eketone said the "movement" was a significant milestone for the farmer-owned dairy co-operative.

Storing, and moving by rail, milk products from the North Taieri site would save money, boost local employment and save wear and tear on local roads.

The 120 daily truck movements through Mosgiel would be cut by about 80% when train movements peaked at about four trains a day, Mr Eketone said.

There were 26 operations staff, mostly forklift drivers, at the site, and another five already working for Fonterra in Dunedin would join the coolstore, Mr Eketone said.

The first train also heralds the completion of the coolstore and railway sidings in Fonterra's staged redevelopment of the old Fisher and Paykel plant on Stedman Rd.

The warehouse, for product from Fonterra's Edendale and Stirling factories, can store 17,000 tonnes of cool storage.

Its dry product capacity was unavailable yesterday.

Plans to extend the coolstore were still being discussed, Mr Eketone said.

The co-operative in February floated the idea of turning the hub into an inland port for importers and exporters, to make use of improved rail lines and significant regional storage.

It would mean containers full of imported products would be emptied on the site so the containers could be refilled with dairy products for export.

 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

Castlecliff Branch Line

Regular rail traffic is to resume shortly on the Castlecliff branch line in Wanganui to collect containerised export product for Open Country Dairy. The extent of work needed to prepare the four km line is currently being scoped by the KiwiRail Network team.

At this stage one return service a day is planned along the line, says KiwiRail Freight National manager IMEX, Mike Lambert.

“A rail served load out facility will be built at the inland port facility setup by the Port Taranaki and a consortium of local businesses, next to the dairy factory warehouse. With the multi-year transport contract with OCD secured, the growth prospects for this area are looking good.”

The line has not been used for regular services since 2004.

 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

Westland Milk Going Strong

Our new business carrying bulk milk and finished product for Westland Dairy is going strong.

Key Account executive Nicole Woodgate say dedicated services are running at capacity in both directions since a new operation began in August to carry bulk milk across the Southern Alps from Canterbury to Hokitika. This has complemented existing arrangements to bring finished product back to Canterbury for export.

“Westland Dairy has now acquired their own fleet of tanks for the service, so we are sending these across to the West Coast full with their empty containers, which come back full to their Rolleston facility. We then take export from Rolleston out to Lyttelton,” Nicole says.

“This is a seven-days a week business and there is a good future for it, but we may need to look at some infrastructure improvements on the Coast if we want to grow capacity.”

 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

(From the New Zealand Transport Intelligence Website)

KiwiRail is upgrading its less than trainload coal handling capacity ordering 80 new HLC coal containers. The existing containers are effectively worn out and the replacements will support the ongoing movement of containerised coal for Eastern Coal and Solid Energy. The new containers will also help overcome health and safety concerns with the existing containers when ice forms on the walkways. Instead the new containers come with wind-up tarpaulins which can be operated from ground level. The first of the new ISO-standard 20-foot open containers will be delivered about mid-November.

Meanwhile in support of its coal traffic in Southland, KiwiRail Network has a programme under way over the next few years on the Wairio Branch Line to ensure it can continue to carry coal to Fonterra's Clandeboye plant for the long term. The work involves replacement of some 32,000 sleepers and welding the rail joints over the 75km route from Makarewa to Nightcaps. KiwiRail has also taken delivery of the first of 70 TSL class containers to carry dairy products in the South Island. These will be delivered in two shipments to Dunedin to have their curtains and load-securing gear fitted by the Container Maintenance team.

KiwiRail Principal Design Engineer Tony Pepperell says the 25-foot containers- two of which can be fitted on a standard wagon - are effectively the next-generation of TSDs and have been both lightened and had their loading areas enlarged. Because they never get lifted when loaded, he says KiwiRail found it could save some weight and get another 50mm height in the side opening for forktrucks and thereby lessen the likelihood of damage. To be used mainly for dry products from the Edendale factory, the containers are expected to progressively enter service from mid-November.

http://www.nztransport-logistics.co.nz/home/free-articles/rail-new-wagons-for-coal-and-dairy-traffic.html

 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed

I understand that Holcim have put of a final desicion on the new cement plant at weston until next year whilst they re examine costings. Thus do not expect any news on relaying the branch to service the new works for some months yet.

 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed

KiwiRail’s efforts to move a glut of

milk from the upper South Island

across to the North Island for

processing at short notice has

drawn high praise from Fonterra.

With dairy herds in full flush, the

Clandeboye dairy factory in South

Canterbury was at capacity so

an urgent call came through for

volumes that would usually head

south from Blenheim to be diverted

to Whareroa in South Taranaki

instead.

South Island Customer services

staff Greg Bowron and Auckland

LSM Craig Stewart sprung into

action to put a plan together and

worked through the weekend and

across the early part of this week to

manage the movement of more than

1 million litres of milk, using a mix of

rail and road transport. The teams

at the Blenheim and Palmerston

North CT sites kept their sites open

and worked the extra hours needed

to move the product.

Fonterra’s Logistics Planning

Manager for Milk Supply, Keith

Roach was quick to voice his thanks

for their efforts in managing the

situation at short notice.

“The many late night calls paid off -

to do what we did was nothing less

than incredible,” he says.

“Arranging for us to communicate

directly to the captain of the ship

and key people in the movement

was certainly a key factor in this

achievement.

“While I fear we may have created

a monster in doing this movement

at short notice it comes down to the

relationship we have built with each

other.”

Meanwhile another member of the

Customer services team has been

putting in long hours to manage our

dairy traffic at the other end of the

island.

Evelyn Hamel has been coming

into work in the small hours of the

morning to keep a close eye on our

new Edendale services and iron

out any glitches that arise. These

are carrying finished product to

Fonterra’s new Mosgiel hub and

Port Chalmers. For Evelyn being

able to put in place contingencies in

the first week means that she can

rest easier as this new traffic settles

in to a normal routine.

 
wanderer53 Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: front left seat EE set now departed

Fonterra's controversial milk processing plant planned near Darfield has been given the go-ahead.

Resource consents for the dairy giant's proposed $150 million factory have been granted by an independent panel, just over a month since the hearing finished and five months after consents were lodged.

The decision reveals Fonterra bought the neighbouring boutique bed and breakfast Oaks Historic Homestead, owned by the factory's fiercest opponent, Madeleine de Jong, seemingly paving the way for the development.

Fonterra, which already runs nine dairy processing plants in the South Island, expects construction of its new factory to start by the middle of next year – if it is not appealed.

Fonterra's New Zealand operations director Brent Taylor said the company was "reasonably confident" of gaining consent and the company hoped to start operating by August 2012.

Fonterra had been negotiating with de Jong for several months.

Buying her land was an agreement between a "willing buyer and a willing seller", he said.

De Jong said the Selwyn district plan's permissiveness had forced her out.

"At least Fonterra has done the decent thing and come up with a ... settlement for me and I can move on."

In the decision, commissioners acknowledged a "considerable" number of people, mainly from the Darfield area, opposed the development.

"We consider that their fears are overstated and the plant will not affect them as much as they believe it will," the decision said.

Opponent Liz Weir, of Coalgate, was disappointed but not surprised by the decision. "Fonterra's a big company which is making the country money – no-one's going to step in their way."

An appeal was "highly unlikely" because of the expense, she said.

Another opponent, Reuben Hunt, of Coalgate, said it was a sad day for Darfield and the surrounding area.

Selwyn District Mayor Kelvin Coe said considering the economic climate the granting of consents was good news. "It's good to see commercial growth on the western side of Selwyn District and I'm sure it will lead to residential growth."

The factory, sitting on a 680-hectare site 3.5 kilometres from Darfield, will be capable of producing up to 16 tonnes of milk powder per hour.

The building will be up to 52 metres high, with a 60m-high smokestack.

The commissioners admitted the major industrial complex would adversely affect rural character and amenity, while tanker trips through Darfield would significantly increase.

Sulphur dioxide discharges from the 30 megawatt, probably coal-fired boiler "would be minor" and effects on Darfield's ambient air quality "are acceptable", they said.

Because of potential effects on groundwater nitrate concentrations from wastewater produced by the factory, extra conditions had been added as a "backstop".

However, the decision said the new factory would not encourage dairy conversions in the Darfield area and the buildings, milk tankers and, potentially, railway wagons would be almost completely screened from the site's boundaries "within a few years".

Although economic benefits were difficult to quantify, they added up to a "formidable positive factor", the commissioners said.

 
alexjc Deputy Commissioner

Sad Oaks Historic Homestead was all but destroyed in September's earthquake...so you can see why de Jong took the money.

Darfield is a lovely place and desirable to many as a retirement area. The town is the reason why there is that 'kink' in what would have been a straight line to Sheffield. Today's Tramway road was the orginal alignment but lobbying by locals got the line diverted onto it's present course before track was laid. The Tranz Alpine passes through it daily, and it was once the junction of the Whitecliffs Branch.

Fonterra are good corporate citizens and siting the factory 3.5kms away from the town was always the intention.

 
Tonymercury Sir Nigel Gresley

Location: Botany NSW

From KiwiRail Express:

Dairy traffic justifies branch line re-opening.

The growth in the dairy industry has lead to a re-opening of the Castlecliff branch line, with Open Country Cheese shipping milk powder from the Wanganui branch line to a warehouse on the Castlecliff line.

The line was closed 8 years ago because of economic conditions at the time, KiwiRail Network central regional manager Walter Rushbrook said. While it is not currently fit for purpose, it is in reasonable condition. Some removal of vegetation, upgrading of ballast and sleepers, and fastening work is being done to bring it up to standard.

That work, and a loading area upgrade to be carried out by the warehouse owners, is expected to be completed by the end of this month. A decision has yet to be made when the trains will start running along the re-opened branch line. When the Castlecliff line does open, four level crossings will be reinstated. That will involve important work to reduce risk from the proposed timetable of four trains a night (between 6pm and 7am) travelling at 25 km/h.

KiwiRail signals planning engineer Roy Percival said a Flashing Lights and Bells alarm system is to be installed at the Heads Road 3.67km crossing, hopefully by the end of this year. This should be before the line is re-opened for trains, but if trains are required to operate before the alarms are commissioned then “alarms not working” signs would be installed on the flashing light masts and a temporary 10 km/h speed restriction imposed on train movements.

The other crossing on Heads Road (3.08km) is also eligible for FLB alarms, and has been added to the Road Level Crossing Upgrading Priority List. It is expected to be installed by the end of 2013. Before then, it will have “Give Way” and “Railway Crossing” signs on both sides.

The crossings on Bedford Avenue and Balgownie Avenue are expected to have light traffic use. The

Bedford Ave crossing will be protected with a “stop” plus a “Railway Crossing” sign on both sides of the crossing. Balgownie Ave will have “Give Way” and “Railway Crossing” signs on both sides of the railway.

 

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