Monarto South To Appamurra

 
  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales
Definately look like grain bunkers do when they're empty, Ian. Assuming the imagery is the same as that around Saddleworth, to the west of Eudunda, the Saddleworth grain bunkers are holding a lot more grain. Is the Eudunda area considered marginal for cropping? Are these bunkers filled every year? Are the silos used?
"rhino"


Is Saddleworth still on the rail network?

--Bill

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  rhino Chief Commissioner

Location: Oakbonk SA
It's on a disused line - the old broad gauge Burra line.
  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales
It's on a disused line - the old broad gauge Burra line.
"rhino"


Can this line be utilised to move grain from the silos at Saddleworth?

--Bill
  fabricator Chief Commissioner

Location: Gawler
It's on a disused line - the old broad gauge Burra line.
"rhino"


Can this line be utilised to move grain from the silos at Saddleworth?
"freightgate"


Disused as in the odd tree growing between the rails!
The track is still there, but only the rails would be any good.
  steam4ian Chief Commissioner

G'day Rhino

I've been past Eudunda a few times and can't say for sure that I've seen grain in them. I had work associated with the Morgan Whyalla Pipeline and travelled through Eudunda, usually on the way back froim the pumping station north of Robertstown.

The area east of Eudunda gets very marginal for grain although close along the ranges to Dutton/Truro the country is not bad. Out Australia Plains way they would only get a good crop about every three years, or so it appeard to me.

Regards
Ian
  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales
Well ... who can blame them....they've just posted a measly $30billion profit for the last 12 months, haven't they?   Anger
"rhino"


I weep for BHP with the small profits they are making:



BHP makes $58m profit per day

Update Global mining giant BHP Billiton has posted a record half-year profit of $US10.52 billion, upped the dividend it will pay shareholders and plans to return $10 billion in cash to its many shareholders.

For the six months to the end of December, the company posted revenue of $US34.166 billion ($34.3 billion) this morning, up 39 per cent on the same period the year for 2009.
Advertisement: Story continues below

Much of the rise was attributed to soaring iron ore, copper and oil prices, mainstays of the world's biggest miner's business.

Profit rose a whopping 71.5 per cent. In Australian dollars, the profit was $10.56 billion, based on today's exchange rate. That is the equivalent of $57.7 million a day, and the largest interim profit recorded for an Australian company.

BHP is the world's biggest mining company. With a market value of 247.5 billion dollars, it accounts for almost one-fifth of the main ASX200 share index of Australia's top 200 companies. By contrast, the market value of the big four banks - CBA, NAB, ANZ and Westpac - totals a combined $278 billion, based on yesterday's closing numbers.

Still, the monster profit numbers weren't enough to spark a share price gain today. BHP shares were down as much as 91 cents, or 1.9 per cent, in morning trade to $46.45, in part because of weaker commodity prices overnight.

BHP's profit before one-off items - unusual expenditures - was $US10.7 billion ($10.74 billion), compared with market-watchers' expectations of $US10.3 billion.

http://www.theage.com.au/business/bhp-makes-58m-profit-per-day-20110216-1avjt.html


They are very hard up and could not possibility invest in some rail network.  Why would they when you have councils who rubberstamp wholesale truck movements?

--Bill
  GN4472 Deputy Commissioner

It's on a disused line - the old broad gauge Burra line.
"rhino"


Can this line be utilised to move grain from the silos at Saddleworth?

--Bill
"freightgate"


Some of the track has been washed out during recent floods near Tarlee - See photo in latest issue of Catchpoint on page 12.
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
I doubt that any of the remaining BG lines in the north could be used without a complete relaying now, even the Barossa line needs this, as drivers that have had problems will attest. I know of one that had a bingle at very slow speed, that slow actually that a funeral could have passed them.
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
Bill (Freightgate), at present there is no rail line to Roxby Downs / Olympic Dam. Freight would have to be trans-shipped at Pimba for the last 90km to Roxby Downs of 105km to Olympic Dam. While you and I see this as a better option that the road trains, BHP obviously does not, although I believe they are interested in putting in a line to the mine, maybe it's been mentioned in the EIS? Certainly should have been, IMHO.
"rhino"

BHP are only interested in a line to the mine if the taxpayer picks up the tab.
"bingley hall"


It should be remembered that all of the ore mined at Olympic Dam is processed on site, and a rail link was never seen as viable.
The Plans for the proposed expansion do however call for a rail link, but then the expansion will mean a massive increase in production.
  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales


It should be remembered that all of the ore mined at Olympic Dam is processed on site, and a rail link was never seen as viable.
The Plans for the proposed expansion do however call for a rail link, but then the expansion will mean a massive increase in production.
"Pressman"


Does this costing approach also account for the environmental impacts of using many trucks per day to the port of adelaide?  Even if trucks were to be used, then why not have a siding on the Alice line as an interchange point?

--Bill
  witsend Chief Commissioner

Location: Front RH Seat of a School Bus
One wonders what the carbon tax may do to assist rail.
  tractorshunter Junior Train Controller

Location: Radiator Springs


It should be remembered that all of the ore mined at Olympic Dam is processed on site, and a rail link was never seen as viable.
The Plans for the proposed expansion do however call for a rail link, but then the expansion will mean a massive increase in production.
"Pressman"


Does this costing approach also account for the environmental impacts of using many trucks per day to the port of adelaide?  Even if trucks were to be used, then why not have a siding on the Alice line as an interchange point?

--Bill
"freightgate"



My understanding is they require enormous tonnages of cement to fill in parts of the mine so they can remove ore alongside where they've been before. I guess a laymans way of describing it is that if you look at the ore body like a brick wall, and you want to remove every brick without it collapsing, then you have to replace the bricks with something else like cement as you remove them.
If anybody has a better understanding how Olympic Dam is mined please add. I might be incorrect but that's my basic grasp if how it operates.

You'll see Linfox's cement tanker road trains on Port Wakefield Road every day. They are specially made cement tankers to carry copper plates for the trip back to Adelaide.

With the expansion to go open cut, the cement isn't needed so the copper as a one way freight could make rail more competative.
I doubt any drums of Uranium yellowcake ever going on rail. We don't any smelly, hairy hippies ( and that's just the women) protesting on a main rail line. Wink
  rhino Chief Commissioner

Location: Oakbonk SA
You're right about concrete being used to fill in the stopes, and these stopes are apparently the size (volume) of a 20-storey building, underground! As you say, once the open cut starts, these stopes won't exist, therefore they won't need to be filled, therefore the cement tankers will no longer be required.
  tractorshunter Junior Train Controller

Location: Radiator Springs
One wonders what the carbon tax may do to assist rail.
"witsend"


May help to a large extent.  Some announcement about it today by the government. Depends,as always, how big the concessions are to some industries like transport.

Need to careful with this topic, as it can easily become a soap box between climate change sceptics and believers.
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
The cement is also used to line the shafts and drives (instead of the old idea of timber suring)
  Nightfire Minister for Railways

Location: Gippsland
The cement is also used to line the shafts and drives (instead of the old idea of timber suring)
"Pressman"


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shotcrete
  steam4ian Chief Commissioner

The drives are in hard rock and pretty much self supporting.

The cement is mixed with the mulock  and used as back fill to provide roof support.

Pretty much as Rhino said

Ian
  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales
Why was it not possible to use rail between the rail head on the closet point to the site and at Port Adelaide?  Would that make sense?

--Bill
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
Why was it not possible to use rail between the rail head on the closet point to the site and at Port Adelaide?  Would that make sense?

--Bill
"freightgate"


You would still need trucks at both ends.
Adelaide Brighton has no rail connection, so would need to load trucks then transfer the load to rail, then at Pimba you'd need to transfer back to truck. So two transfer plants would be required, and specialised rail wagons are required for transporting cement powder.
All this adds cost to the overall transport charge.
  freightgate Minister for Railways

Location: Albury, New South Wales


You would still need trucks at both ends.
Adelaide Brighton has no rail connection, so would need to load trucks then transfer the load to rail, then at Pimba you'd need to transfer back to truck. So two transfer plants would be required, and specialised rail wagons are required for transporting cement powder.
All this adds cost to the overall transport charge.
"Pressman"


Trying to understand the economics.  Is the cement plant a new plant or existing?

--Bill
  steam4ian Chief Commissioner

G'day Bill

The cement works has been on the site since before the war, it used to serviced by a rail siding because bulk cement was railed to Pt Pirie. Other commodities were railed in and out, including flyash.

The bulk cement tankers, they were air discharge type, disappeared long ago.

It would require double handling of the cement if it were to be railed to say Pimba.

Regards
Ian
  steam4ian Chief Commissioner

G'day all

I drove past Appamurra siding today and noted that Vitera were shipping grain out by road. Large area of ön ground" storage.

Interestingly the bridges have been left on the RoW between Appamurra and Cambrai, on other abandonned routes the bridges were lifted.

Regards
Ian
  simont141 Chief Commissioner

Location: Adelaide

Interestingly the bridges have been left on the RoW between Appamurra and Cambrai, on other abandonned routes the bridges were lifted.
"steam4ian"


That rail was recovered by PRR in May 2001. The bridges weren't of any use, and their historical value being left in situ is greater than their scrap value.
  Pressman Spirit of the Vine

Location: Wherever the Tin Chook or Qantas takes me
G'day Bill

The cement works has been on the site since before the war, it used to serviced by a rail siding because bulk cement was railed to Pt Pirie. Other commodities were railed in and out, including flyash.

The bulk cement tankers, they were air discharge type, disappeared long ago.

It would require double handling of the cement if it were to be railed to say Pimba.

Regards
Ian
"steam4ian"


Adelaide Brighton Cement has expanded and enlarged it's Birkenhead works a few time since the rail was "disconnected"
The original rail sidings (rail is still there is some places) have been disconnected and the crossing across Elder Road has been removed.
The Bulk outload (road only) is now located on the wharf side of the complex (off Stirling St.) and because of the new Port River rail bridge, it would be rather tricky to lay a rail siding into that location.
  tractorshunter Junior Train Controller

Location: Radiator Springs
Talking about this topic with a mate last night (formally in the trucking game).  The Linfox cement tankers also take flyash from the Pt Augusta power station down to Adelaide Brighton. Apparently it's used in the production of cement.

I have no idea how this is done or the volumes involved or where and how it's outloaded at the power station.  Anybody know more about this??

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