8010 bicentennial

 
  Stu49 Junior Train Controller

Hi,

Does anyone know if 8010 had both fixed multiple unit cables replaced by sockets or just one?
I have one photo of 8010 (loco profile) but have found no others that show the other end of the loco.

cheers
Stu

Sponsored advertisement

  hanovale Deputy Commissioner

IIRC 8010 and the rest of the class had both fixed MU cables (and the sloping housing) replaced with sockets, presumably at CCO. I don't remember whether this happened at the same time as repainting or whether the bicentennials carried the fixed cable for a period (and I couldn't be asred checking my photos at the moment). The other repaints came later and I don't think any candy or blue units had the fixed cable.
  hanovale Deputy Commissioner

A bit more information and clarification of my earlier post. I've just come across a late 1988 photo of 8040 that shows it still had the fixed MU cable for some time after being painted in bicentennial scheme.
  NSWRcars Chief Train Controller

Does anyone know if 8010 had both fixed multiple unit cables replaced by sockets or just one?
I have one photo of 8010 (loco profile) but have found no others that show the other end of the loco.
"Stu49"
I have January 1991 and July 1993 photos of the No1 end of 8010 (assuming radiator fan is at the No2 end?), with a replacement MU socket. Paint mismatch suggests this happened after its Bicentennial repaint.
A July 1993 photo of 8040 shows it still carrying a fixed cable; I can't tell which end of the loco.
  Stu49 Junior Train Controller

I have January 1991 and July 1993 photos of the No1 end of 8010 (assuming radiator fan is at the No2 end?), with a replacement MU socket. Paint mismatch suggests this happened after its Bicentennial repaint.
A July 1993 photo of 8040 shows it still carrying a fixed cable; I can't tell which end of the loco.
"NSWRcars"


The photo on page 13 of the loco profile book shows the end opposite to the large roof mounted fan. It has no fixed cable just a socket.

Guess that means both ends have no fixed cable.

cheers
Stu
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
It may have been done as a quick fix or something to damaged fixed MU cables at the time, it might have been quicker to install the MU socket than to add a new fixed cable to them, if this was the case then it is possible that it might have had a MU socket one end and a fixed MU cable at the other at some time in it's life.

You would really need two photos taken on the same day or thereabouts anyway to confirm that it had MU sockets both ends at that particular time. To keep a locomotive in service was the main thing and a quick fix like this was not uncommon.
  42101 Banned

Location: Banned
It may have been done as a quick fix or something to damaged fixed MU cables at the time, it might have been quicker to install the MU socket than to add a new fixed cable to them, if this was the case then it is possible that it might have had a MU socket one end and a fixed MU cable at the other at some time in it's life.
"David Peters"


Do try researching some facts will you ...it would actualy take LONGER to wire in a standard MU socket and the wiring run extension than to just take off the cover and rewire in a new cable.
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
If they had the parts on hand at the time, you can run out of things you know even the best kept workshop does so sooner or later. So as I said rather than keep it out of service till the parts became available, they did what would be termed a quick fix ( Bush fix if you like) to get it out and about again. It will not earn it's keep standing in a loco depot or workshop. 8)
  hanovale Deputy Commissioner

It was not a quick fix, it was done to all of the 80 class as they came due for major service / CCO around 1990 (give or take a couple of years). The reason for the change was explained to me at one time by the Chief Loco Inspector in Parkes but I don't recall the details although I have a vague recollections that the number of pins on the two types of cable was different and the socket gave the 80 class greater versatility (and used a standard cable that could be replaced en route when necessary). This change may also have been related to the brief period of through running of certain 80s and the ALs between Lithgow and ?Port Pirie.
  beyerpeacock Assistant Commissioner

Location: Gorton Foundry
It may have been done as a quick fix or something to damaged fixed MU cables at the time, it might have been quicker to install the MU socket than to add a new fixed cable to them, if this was the case then it is possible that it might have had a MU socket one end and a fixed MU cable at the other at some time in it's life.

You would really need two photos taken on the same day or thereabouts anyway to confirm that it had MU sockets both ends at that particular time. To keep a locomotive in service was the main thing and a quick fix like this was not uncommon.
"David Peters"


David, I honestly don't see the point in speculating old son.
  David Peters Dr Beeching

Location: "With Hey Boy".
Well does anyone know the actual reason for the change over as outlined by Hanovale, otherwise we are all speculating are we not.
  t_woodroffe Assistant Commissioner


Well does anyone know the actual reason for the change over as outlined by Hanovale, otherwise we are all speculating are we not.

The SRA of NSW 80 and 81 Class locomotives were delivered with fixed jumper cables and sockets for a 49? pin jumper cable. This was not in accordance with AAR standards so a 27 pin receptacle (as well as the 49 pin receptacle) was fitted to allow the locomotives to MU with other classes not fitted with the 49 pin arrangement. SRA in their infinite wisdom decided that more pins were better and could provide more "communication" capability between MU locomotives hence the adoption of the 49 pin jumper cables/receptacles. Unfortunately the 49 pin cables had button contacts that proved very unreliable so the 49 pin cables were replaced with stock standard AAR 27 pin cables from the mid to late 1980s as I recall.

It was not an expedient quick fix. It was fixing a problem that should not have arisen in the first place!

TW
  hanovale Deputy Commissioner

Thank you TW. My 20+ year old recollection was that the 80 originally had a fixed cable with a 42 pin connector and that the locos were modified to include a socket with a 27 pin connction. The fact that I got one of the two numbers right is pleasing.

Important as MU connections are on any locomotive class, they were perhaps even more important on the 80 class because for much of their lives they were banned from being crewed in the No2 end because of fumes in the cab. This, along with their general lack of reliability, meant that they generally had to work in multiple, even when the load was lightll enough for a single loco. Many times I saw a pair of 80 class working 15 or so hoppers to Yarrabandai or Derriwong or Bogan Gate because a single 80 was not permitted to return No 2 end first.

The fumes in the cab led to a number of modifications being trialled on individual locos including additional vents on the roof and replacement of one of the body windows with a vent designed to pressurise the engine room. To the best of my knowledge all the trials conducted in the late 80s -early 90s were failures.
  t_woodroffe Assistant Commissioner


The fact that I got one of the two numbers right is pleasing.

You might have gotten both numbers correct; I am sure the number of pins on the original fixed jumper was forty something! They might have been Wilco plugs/sockets if memory serves me correctly.

The semi permanent 27 pin jumpers VR/V Line rigged up on the C Class, G Class, N class etc etc seems to have become pretty widespread. The 27 pin connectors are very reliable.

TW
  42101 Banned

Location: Banned
TWand Hanovale
Thanks fellas for the technical details of the changes(Quickfix LaughingLaughing Yeah right Laughing ) to these heaps of junk.

Just on the general topic of 80 class Puke
We used to send up to 4 of the suckers west on the high wheelers just to make sure there were at least 2 still going by the time it got to Broken Hill...they were also notorious for throwing large gobs of hot oil out the exhaust when reved up after idling for a bit...8040 got me one arvo at Parkes when i was doing the brakes on its train and i had to go home for a shower and fresh uniform. Evil or Very MadEvil or Very MadEvil or Very Mad
  t_woodroffe Assistant Commissioner


Just on the general topic of 80 class

More than thirty years in the industry and I have yet to hear a positive comment about 80 Class locos .... they must have some good points? First locos in NSW to be air conditioned??

TW

Sponsored advertisement

Subscribers: pawanoro

Display from:   

Quick Reply

We've disabled Quick Reply for this thread as it was last updated more than six months ago.