CBH lose grain monopoly

 
  8888 Chief Commissioner

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  JNSymes Junior Train Controller

Finally, some variety in WA grain trains....
  djukinX1016 Deputy Commissioner

Unfortunately the new exporters via Bunbury and Albany have nominated road transport.
  crisfitz Chief Commissioner

Location: Enroute somewhere
Just because farmer Joe can transport his grain how ever he wants it doesn't mean much to rail.

In fact it will more likely result in more farmers using road transport, as the quantities individual farmers want to move won't generally equate to enough to justify a train.
  drwaddles In need of a breath mint

Location: Newcastle
Just because farmer Joe can transport his grain how ever he wants it doesn't mean much to rail.

In fact it will more likely result in more farmers using road transport, as the quantities individual farmers want to move won't generally equate to enough to justify a train.
crisfitz

Bingo. If anything it means a more precarious position for the lesser used lines (Tier 3 and Tier 2).

Best case outcome for rail is either:

- New blokes go broke, or
- New blokes get sufficient tonnages that rail starts becoming more economic than road

Seems unlikely given that the two nominated ports are Albany and Bunbury, both of which have very poor rail access from the wheat growing areas. Expect to see more grain on Coalfields Highway and Chester Pass Road.
  Trainplanner Chief Commissioner

Location: Along the Line
I think it will be interesting times.  As WA is the leading producer of grain in the country there is likely to be potential opportunities for additional rail haulage by other grain handlers.  The eastern states experience with lower tonnages has shown that but it took some time to develop.  In Victoria and NSW we have had up to 4 grain handlers using rail so you've got to assume there maybe opportunities out of a few of the major inland terminals to see other handlers partner with Aurizon or QUBE.  Containerised export grain of special blends and varieties of grain that is higher yielding from a revenue perspective could be a possibilty.  The issue will be about availability of narrow gauge locos and wagons but they do exist.  Certainly its a real possibilty on SG where the equipment can be got very quickly.

In Victoria some of these new players in grain haulage on rail are running surprisingly short distances so it must be competitive if they have chosen rail over road.  If you take Horsham to Melbourne similar to Merredin to Fremantly QUBE and SCT are hauling containerised grain in addition the bulk unit grain operations of Pacific National, El Zorro and G&W on behalh of different grain handlers.

Will be very interesting to see what happens!!!!
  WAGR Chief Commissioner

Unfortunately the new exporters via Bunbury and Albany have nominated road transport.

I under stand that a second grain exporter is also looking at exporting grain thru Bunbury Port at about 1MTPA along with the other 1MPTA that's 2MTPA over the Coalfields Hwy and connecting roads. That is a lot of trucking movements.
djukinX1016
  1978Prime Junior Train Controller

Location: Perth
I'm not so sure that large amounts of grain would be shipped by road instead of rail, at least not directly from farm to port. A few years ago`when I worked at a grain bin during the harvest season, I would see the same trucks come in several times a day from a local farm. And I'm talking about  road trains. I got the impression that the farmers like to cut their harvest as quickly as possible because of the large amounts they have to harvest. I think carting the grain to the nearest receival point would remain an attractive option rather than the extra time required to ship it directly to port which could be hundreds of kms' away or throwing a large fleet or trucks at the job to get it done quickly.
  drwaddles In need of a breath mint

Location: Newcastle
I'm not so sure that large amounts of grain would be shipped by road instead of rail, at least not directly from farm to port. A few years ago`when I worked at a grain bin during the harvest season, I would see the same trucks come in several times a day from a local farm. And I'm talking about  road trains. I got the impression that the farmers like to cut their harvest as quickly as possible because of the large amounts they have to harvest. I think carting the grain to the nearest receival point would remain an attractive option rather than the extra time required to ship it directly to port which could be hundreds of kms' away or throwing a large fleet or trucks at the job to get it done quickly.
1978Prime
Getting the harvest cut quickly is because every hour extra its left there is another hour that exposes it to potential destruction by natures forces...

In terms of silo/bin to port, it all comes down the economics. If there's enough to cart then road can be uneconomic. The threshold is surprisingly high for road though as those same road trains doing farm to bin will then be able to do bin-to-port runs once they run out of farm-to-bin runs.

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