Model Weathering Thread

 
  Thumpa Chief Train Controller

Location: That's on a need to know basis.
Hello all,

There seems to a growing interest in weathering models, what sort of medium used, techniques and in general, HDYDT (How Did You Do That)? May I start a thread about the topic, if it dies a natural death then so be it.

I start with a little project I did today, a SDS Models tanker. Weathered using air brush with Floquil colours of Grimy black, Mud, Dust and Rust. Tamiya Smoke for the oil stains applied with brush and sealed with Dullcote.


To aid me with the task, I made up a crued paint stain to support the model. Made out Aluminum flat bar, it was bent into shape and tabs at each end with a hole drilled through where, the bogie screws can be used to mount the wagon in place on the stand. Added benifit, wagons of the same bogie centre can also be mounted on the stand.



As mention before, it's a rough job. It was done just to see if the concept would work for me. I've got some ideas I'll employ with the Beta version.

Thumpa

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  Roachie Chief Commissioner

Location: Kadina SA (formerly NSW)
Great job Thumpa.....

I have 8 of these new RTCs already with 3 more still to come. They look great but will look even better when I do some weathering. I hope I can do as good a job as you have with the one.

The stand is very snazzy too.....

Cheers

Roachie
  Blackaddar Junior Train Controller

Location: Canberra, ACT
That looks so cool Smile i recently only picked up a compressor and an airbrush to use myself, i have some weathering powders that i intend to try out on some of my rolling stock, ill try and get some pictures up to show you soon.

Black
  catchpoint Assistant Commissioner

Location: At the end of a loop
Thumpa,

I note in one of your pictures you have a wheel holding jig for painting the wheels faces and keeping treads clean?

Did you make this as well or is a proprietary item, if you did make it yourself, could you share the details please.

Regards,

Catchpoint
  John_Bushell Chief Commissioner

Location: Brisbane
Nice jig Thumpa.  It would not be all that much work to cut the horizontal bar, cut another length of the same bar, bolt one end to the original horizontal and make a series of holes where the other end can be attached.  Elongate the holes a bit for fine adjustment and your jig can be used for a variety of wheel bases.  You could just solder one end and leave the other to bolt in various positions.  Use a couple of bolts to prevent twisting or bending.

Best regards,
John
  Blackaddar Junior Train Controller

Location: Canberra, ACT
Thumpa,

I note in one of your pictures you have a wheel holding jig for painting the wheels faces and keeping treads clean?

Did you make this as well or is a proprietary item, if you did make it yourself, could you share the details please.

Regards,

Catchpoint
catchpoint

Seems Thumpa has just used some aluminum that you can source from any hardware store and just bent the necessary and desired lengths, it sounds complicated but depending on the gauge of aluminum you get, it should be too hard to make that rig.

tho how Thumpa arrived at the dimensions and sharing said design would be great Smile.

Black
  catchpoint Assistant Commissioner

Location: At the end of a loop
Seems Thumpa has just used some aluminum that you can source from any hardware store and just bent the necessary and desired lengths, it sounds complicated but depending on the gauge of aluminum you get, it should be too hard to make that rig.

tho how Thumpa arrived at the dimensions and sharing said design would be great Smile.

Black
Blackaddar

Thanks for your advice, yes the wagon holding jig is relatively straightforward, and could be fabricated out of many different materials and not just pieces of frozen electricity as Thumpa has done but,

I actually asked about.........

"I note in one of your pictures you have a wheel holding jig"
Catchpoint
Regards,

Catchpoint
  Roachie Chief Commissioner

Location: Kadina SA (formerly NSW)
With regard to the wagon-holding jig......

One of my other interests is camping/4wdriving. In that "hobby" we use telescoping tent poles for holding up awnings etc. There are 2 basic kinds. One involves 2 bits of aluminium (one inside the other) and when you adjust the height to the desired level, you twist the junction between the 2 poles and they stay in that position. However, thinking of the other (old fashioned) type, it involves a triangular shaped wing nut.....you stretch the pole to the desired position and tighten the wing nut.

This got me thinking. Obtain one of these poles (the latter type), cut both ends to a length of about 6" (150mm). Mount each one on a transverse foot (glue or pop-rivet). Make sure the wing nut is pointing vertically upwards. Now attach an upright with a small bent bit and hole (similar to the one in the OP's post).

Now it becomes much easier to adjust the jig infinitely to suit any length wagon from about 6.25" up to  around 10". Of course, if these parameters do not suit your rolling stock you can make the tent pole sections longer or shorter as required.

I will add this job to the "TO DO" list.

Roachie
  Gwiwer Rt Hon Gentleman and Ghost of Oliver Bulleid

Location: Loitering in darkest Somewhere
Nice work Sir.

As a fairly recent convert to the dark art of weathering myself might I be permitted a platform?  Pun intended, of course!

I use several techniques which include pen-and-ink, soft pencil, weathering powders and dry-brushed paint.  The airbrush is ready and waiting (and has been for far too long) but has made little impression as yet upon the rolling stock fleet.

First an example of powder work where different colours have been brushed upwards across the body and worked into corners with a rag.

[img]http://i189.photobucket.com/albums/z273/Gwiwer/Modelling%20work/DSCN8507_zpsdbe7bc8e.jpg[/img]

The entire vehicle looks like this which includes exhaust trails and a soft-sheen touch on the roof achieved with a squirt of $2 hairspray acting as a fixative for the powders.

[img]http://i189.photobucket.com/albums/z273/Gwiwer/Modelling%20work/DSCN8510_zpsa1f8f40b.jpg[/img]

While I model UK outline the techniques used are the same for any theme.  Here's a small steam locomotive with a mix of powders applied.

[img]http://i189.photobucket.com/albums/z273/Gwiwer/Modelling%20work/DSCN7799_zps2618316a.jpg[/img]

For things which go a little faster it is possible to streak the dirt.  This is done by brushing the applied powder along the length of the vehicle with a 1" house-painting brush!

[img]http://i189.photobucket.com/albums/z273/Gwiwer/Modelling%20work/DSCN7771_zps4677cdb1.jpg[/img]

Two more powder-weathered steam locos which includes water-spill on the tank and (just visible) some rusting of the tender springs and speed-streaking along the boiler casing on the Pacific

[img]http://i189.photobucket.com/albums/z273/Gwiwer/Modelling%20work/DSCN6717_zps3a0c26e7.jpg[/img]
  Thumpa Chief Train Controller

Location: That's on a need to know basis.
Thumpa,

I note in one of your pictures you have a wheel holding jig for painting the wheels faces and keeping treads clean?

Did you make this as well or is a proprietary item, if you did make it yourself, could you share the details please.

Regards,

Catchpoint
catchpoint
Yes that was another item created in the man cave. Again it was just an attempt to see what works. I worked out the the spacings from flang to flang which worked out to be near enough to 16mm. Using an off cut of 2mm styrene I heated up the plastic and made a 90degree bend on both sides to form a "U" shape. I made up layers of plywood offcuts and sandwiched them together with the 16mm spacing in between the styrene and then drilled the holes. Again; got some ideas now on how to improve the concept for s better version.
  Thumpa Chief Train Controller

Location: That's on a need to know basis.
Seems Thumpa has just used some aluminum that you can source from any hardware store and just bent the necessary and desired lengths, it sounds complicated but depending on the gauge of aluminum you get, it should be too hard to make that rig.

tho how Thumpa arrived at the dimensions and sharing said design would be great Smile.

Black
"Blackaddar"


Yes quite right, the aluminium flat bar is 10x3mm and comes in a 1 metre length from Bunnings for around $2.60 each. Measured bogie centres and subtracted 10mm to allow the metal thickness and the actual bend of the metal right angle at either side. You can see that one of the metal tab where the screws are, is longer than the other. I wasn't sure how it would work out so gave myself an extra bit of metal to drill through. The height was just a punt, so long as my hands or knuckles didn't block the flow of paint from the air brush. The two support feet were cut to 100mm long each, centres measured and drilled and riveted. Last thing you would want is to be painting the model and blowing it over.
  Thumpa Chief Train Controller

Location: That's on a need to know basis.
Gwiwer, this ones for you!

  Gwiwer Rt Hon Gentleman and Ghost of Oliver Bulleid

Location: Loitering in darkest Somewhere
Thank you kindly.

Firstly for the feedback and second because after years of trying someone has found the "Like Post" button on here Wink
  HWYRNR1984 Station Staff

Location: Chasing a white line somewhere...
Great work everyone and a great idea having a thread dedicated to weathering. After some words of wisdom from Gwiwer, I'm waiting on an order of weathering powders to arrive with some images of my efforts to follow shortly after. Previously I've only weathered using an airbrush or drybrushing. Looking forward to having a crack at powders and I hope to see plenty more work from others posted here!
  Thumpa Chief Train Controller

Location: That's on a need to know basis.
It's been a busy evening in the man cave for me.
Since Tuesdays first post; the gears of innovation have been turning on how to come up with a Beta version to my wagon paint stand. Had a friend send a pic through via email with another concept which played a part (Thanks Mr B).

Here is what I have come up with Smile



So here we have the Beta version from my first attempt. I took a bit more care with the workmanship and took the time to measure and mark before performing a task to reflect a little more accuracy in the construction.

First pic has an Auscision AOOX open wagon, bogie centre is 193mm, at this point in time I would have to say this would be the widest bogie cetre wagon in my collection. I've made the stand to handle up to 206mm bogie centres. The second picture has a SDS Models BMF milk tanker with a bogie centre of just 65mm. The stand can support a RUB or NSW 72'6" pax car with no issues. The overall length of the stand is 210mm.



So to be able to vary the lengths of the various wagons the picture below shows a milled slot of 4mm in the flat bar. Both ends supports have been bent to support the wagons on an even horizontal plane [taking into account the thickness of the bar]. To lock the spand of the two vertical supports, I've used 5/32 nut & bolt [will get some spring washers asap]. Even with the BMF offset from the centre, it remains stable with no signs of wanting to flip up on end with centre of gravity well over the footing.



If anyone has any further questions about the stand, feel free to ask.

Thumpa
  LaidlayM Chief Commissioner

Location: Research
What about a 3 legged version so it will never rock?

Mark
  Thumpa Chief Train Controller

Location: That's on a need to know basis.
What about a 3 legged version so it will never rock?

Mark
LaidlayM
Oh the Rolf Harris edition!

Well it wouldn't be hard at all to make the footing into three from the four. The current version sit nicely on the glass with no rocking in the spray booth 8).
  miktrain Deputy Commissioner

Location: Adelaide SA
With regard to the wagon-holding jig......

One of my other interests is camping/4wdriving. In that "hobby" we use telescoping tent poles for holding up awnings etc. There are 2 basic kinds. One involves 2 bits of aluminium (one inside the other) and when you adjust the height to the desired level, you twist the junction between the 2 poles and they stay in that position. However, thinking of the other (old fashioned) type, it involves a triangular shaped wing nut.....you stretch the pole to the desired position and tighten the wing nut.

This got me thinking. Obtain one of these poles (the latter type), cut both ends to a length of about 6" (150mm). Mount each one on a transverse foot (glue or pop-rivet). Make sure the wing nut is pointing vertically upwards. Now attach an upright with a small bent bit and hole (similar to the one in the OP's post).

Now it becomes much easier to adjust the jig infinitely to suit any length wagon from about 6.25" up to  around 10". Of course, if these parameters do not suit your rolling stock you can make the tent pole sections longer or shorter as required.

I will add this job to the "TO DO" list.

Roachie
Roachie
I would go an even easier method:
Cut the centre bar so that there are two pieces and then it will fit any centre spacing that you like, no need to slot holes or adjust for length, simply screw each half to the wagon and it will stand up.

Tony
  SAR523 Assistant Commissioner

Location: Chicago, IL
I would go an even easier method:
Cut the centre bar so that there are two pieces and then it will fit any centre spacing that you like, no need to slot holes or adjust for length, simply screw each half to the wagon and it will stand up.

Tony
miktrain
I was also thinking of that, but I came to the conclusion that I'd probably want both sets of legs connected to each other to make sure something didn't skew when I picked it up in the spray booth to get at the undercarriage / tilt the body.
  Donald Chief Commissioner

Location: Donald. Duck country.
Good work Thumpa.
  John_Bushell Chief Commissioner

Location: Brisbane
Yeah good one Thumpa.

I have made myself an all singing all dancing spray booth with extractor, lighting and turntable - compressor sits in compartment below - now you have created a new task!  Must make a Thumpa jig.  Damn you Thumpa! Laughing

Best regards,
John
  Gwiwer Rt Hon Gentleman and Ghost of Oliver Bulleid

Location: Loitering in darkest Somewhere
More from the collection

This one's hit a few flies along the way

[img]http://i189.photobucket.com/albums/z273/Gwiwer/Modelling%20work/DSCN6774_zpsb4372af2.jpg[/img]

Powder-weathering used on buildings with an airbrush-weathered loco

[img]http://i189.photobucket.com/albums/z273/Gwiwer/Modelling%20work/DSCN6750_zps1195bb37.jpg[/img]

More powder weathering to smoke-stain the station building

[img]http://i189.photobucket.com/albums/z273/Gwiwer/Penhayle%20Bay%20Railway/DSCN8646_zpsf5f99065.jpg[/img]

Showing dry-brushed paint weathering on the pub - not the best picture in the world but suffice to say the wall and chimney started out pure white

[img]http://i189.photobucket.com/albums/z273/Gwiwer/Penhayle%20Bay%20Railway/DSCN7114_zps221e9aa3.jpg[/img]

More speed-streaked dirt and fairly light weathering on another HST power car

[img]http://i189.photobucket.com/albums/z273/Gwiwer/Penhayle%20Bay%20Railway/DSCN7318_zps52c340a1.jpg[/img]

The boat is weathered with Floquil "Rust" paint and wipes of powder applied with a rag

[img]http://i189.photobucket.com/albums/z273/Gwiwer/Penhayle%20Bay%20Railway/DSCN3521.jpg[/img]

Track weathered with diluted and neat acrylic paint; squeezed straight from the tube this can represent heavy oil-drop staining where diesels stand.

[img]http://i189.photobucket.com/albums/z273/Gwiwer/Penhayle%20Bay%20Railway/DSCN1715.jpg[/img]

And specially for this topic because the unit in question is nicknamed a "Thumper" here's some rain-streaked weathering.  Not actually done with rain of course but with vertical brushing applying differential pressure.

[img]http://i189.photobucket.com/albums/z273/Gwiwer/Modelling%20work/DSCN8103_zps0c2295e6.jpg[/img]
  Thumpa Chief Train Controller

Location: That's on a need to know basis.
AR Kits wheat hopper.
This has had a combination of air brush, black wash, muck wash, brush rust streaking and dusting powders applied to present a battle harden hopper.

  Bowen_Creek Station Master

AR Kits wheat hopper.
This has had a combination of air brush, black wash, muck wash, brush rust streaking and dusting powders applied to present a battle harden hopper.

Thumpa
Thumpa,

Nice stuff. Couple of questions, did you weather this from photos or some where else? What year are you modelling? I guess the 80/90's via the wagon code but can you go more specific?


I made a mistake in over weathering some things because I got caught up in fun. I cant weather my hoppers to the extent you have here because I model early 70's and these hoppers weren't that bad for rust and so on.

Andrew
  a6et Minister for Railways

Thumpa,

Nice stuff. Couple of questions, did you weather this from photos or some where else? What year are you modelling? I guess the 80/90's via the wagon code but can you go more specific?


I made a mistake in over weathering some things because I got caught up in fun. I cant weather my hoppers to the extent you have here because I model early 70's and these hoppers weren't that bad for rust and so on.

Andrew
Bowen_Creek
I tend to agree with Andrew in all counts, while the weathering is excellent, the BWH's with that amount of rust even in the later days, when in regular traffic would be a rare event, unless the wagon was one that had been painted in the red/brown colour.  

OTOH, if it was a steel wagon assigned to Superphosphate traffic that may change owing to the stains on the roof, side & end sills.

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