The Willunga Railway Line

 
  409 Minister for Railways

Do you suppose that you would have a better chance of funding if it was included in the Regional Fast Rail project and built to the same standards? Rolling Eyes

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  allanl Chief Train Controller

Location: In the cab of 526 at 80 mph.
Hi baytram
I have a street directory from about mid 1970's and it shows the track alignment from Hallett Cove to Willunga. I also have aerial photos which also show the track alignment very clearly. I will use these when I extend the Adelaide Metro area route for MSTS from Hallett Cove to Willunga.
If they can assist, more than happy to help.
Also the "Modelling the SAR" convention handbook has an extensive section on the Willunga line. It is superb.
The track alignment is no where near the current alignment to Noarlunga Central. From Hallet Cove, it did a big left and crossed South Road just before Reynella and proceeded down the Eastern side of South Road before crossing it again at Hackam.
regards
allanl
  baytram366 Chief Train Controller

Location: Adelaide
Does anyone know what locos and railcars commonly ran on the line. Can anyone provide a list?
Where I can get my hands on a copy of that issue of the Bulliten from 1965 with the article about the Willunga line. Also, what other rail magazines had articles in them about this line? Issue numbers???
  allan Chief Commissioner

Rxs, 700s and Brill cars were the norm, but almost anything ran on that line. It was convenient to Mile End, was often empty and offered sufficient challenges to be used as a test track for new engines and railcars, and those coming out of overhaul.

I have a series of articles at hand - I have pmed my phone no to you.
  409 Minister for Railways

During the reclaimation work on the line during 1971, a Mk 2 version 930 with a rake of rail wagons and a 8300 brakevan were used.
  1S47 Assistant Commissioner

Location: On the Down Fast
Does anyone know what locos and railcars commonly ran on the line. ........ Also, what other rail magazines had articles in them about this line? Issue numbers???
"baytram366"


The October '99 & Nov'99 issues of "Transit Australia" have lengthy articles on history of the Brighton line operations.   The articles mainly discuss snapshots of the line operations in ~1960 & ~2000 & mainly covers the suburban section, which is not really what you're interested in, but are references & useful info on the Willunga trains (- or train, there was only one per day)

If you PM me your postal address, I can mail you the 2 articles - I still have those issues of TA.   They are very interesting, but I cannot scan & post them here for copyright reasons.

Author of these articles, and editor of Transit Australia, is Ian Hammond, a S.A. resident.  You may be able to get useful info from him for your book - I don't know him personally, but he seems very knowledgable.  I will include I.H's e-mail with the articles if you like.
  baytram366 Chief Train Controller

Location: Adelaide
I can't believe, I didn't ask this before. The Willunga line was a single broad gauage line wasn't it???
Are there any websites that could help me?
  allan Chief Commissioner

Yes, a single broad gauge line, with limited turning facilities. There were turntables at Morphett Vale and at Willunga, but both were removed long before the line was closed. Thete were passing loops at significant stations, and a triangle at Willunga.
  409 Minister for Railways

This may be a silly question but was the triangle at Willunga built after the turntable was removed?
  allan Chief Commissioner

This may be a silly question but was the triangle at Willunga built after the turntable was removed?
"409"


The triangle was built "about 1930". The "... 60' turntable...was removed and installed at Marino in 1941-42."
  409 Minister for Railways

Has the turntable been scrapped since then?
  benscaro Chief Commissioner

I believe it was possible even for 900 class locos to work to Willunga.  Whether many did is a different matter . . . although I believe I have seen a shot of one, memory fails me as to where.

As the line was so close to Adelaide I suppose it made sense to be able to use whatever loco was available.  

Ben
  409 Minister for Railways

I seriously doubt a 900 class went to Willunga, taking in account the 21 tonne axle load and 126 tonne weight. Another consideration was the state of the track and the weight of the rail. The sheer lack of traffic is another factor which rarely, if ever warrented a 900 class.
  benscaro Chief Commissioner

I think it was the Fluck/Sampson SAR diesels book or the fluoro yellow AN diesels softcover which mentioned lines 900s were able to be used on.  I seem to recall Willunga was listed.  I am sure in later years this was not a possibility.

Whether the traffic warranted it may have been a secondary consideration - sometimes big power was used because the units just happened to be sitting round at Mile End spare, or so I believe.  AN did this too - eg, using a V/Line N to haul 4 AHGX to Roseworthy to test the outloader and on short trip workings round the Port Adelaide area, or a BL working a Roseworthy grain.  

Ben
  allan Chief Commissioner

I do not know of a "Fluck/Sampson SAR Diesels book", but there is no mention of the Willunga Line in the AN Diesels book (published, I think, in 1982, long after the demise of the Willunga Line).

The 1963 WTT lists 800, 830 and 930 class diesels for the line.

I, too, doubt that a 900 ever ran past the Pt Stanvac branch junction. Perhaps there is some confusion, here, with the Victor Harbor line.

Allan
  GNR10 Chief Commissioner

What class of track was the Victor line? i thought branches were generally class 3 or lower, how could it take 900s?
  Foamer85 Chief Commissioner

Location: Was Quorn (which is better than Tarcoola) But now Adelaide
I have seen a photo of twin 900's on the willunga line, rare occurance maybe? It was an ARHS special, a passenger car was attched to the regular goods....
  benscaro Chief Commissioner

Yep, its the 1982 book.  Well, if it doesn't say Willunga then I must be mistaken.  

I had heard though that the 900s could go there and next time I'm back in Canberra I'll go to the Buckland Collection and have a look.  

Yeah, I'm aware that they could go to Victor Harbour, though the AN book comments that they were banned from that line 'altogether'.

********

SA was unusual in having a large number of branches mainline locos could visit- Millicent, the Barossa and Victor could all take 900s.  Marginal operations like Mt Pleasant could take 930s.

And it was rather more common in having many lines where even sending a branchline loco was a perilous exercise !  -the Yinkanie line for example.

Cheers

Ben
  409 Minister for Railways

In the book, Railways in the Adelaide hills, it has a photo of a 900 on the Victor Harbour line dated c.1966.
  Alco_Haulic Chief Commissioner

Location: Eating out...
What class of track was the Victor line? i thought branches were generally class 3 or lower, how could it take 900s?
"GNR10"


Victor Harbour was not originally a branch, But a way of getting products from the murry at Goolwa to Pt. Elliot. The line was extended to Victor Harbour later, and at some stage during the web era must have been relayed with 80lb rail, probably due to the large number of holiday traffic the line saw in the earlier days.

Millicent I have no idea about, and the barossa was prpobably upgraded because of the daily stone train, wouldn't want that one to fall vicitm to a derailment now would they.

Many branches in the state were either perilous to almost any loco, eg 40lb rail (or less!), or capable of taking 930's, which were allowed over 60lb rail, just like the 700/710/740 before them.
  409 Minister for Railways

The 900 class were regulars on the limestone run prior to being withdrawn from service.
  Adelaide_passenger Chief Train Controller

Location: Still waiting for that train
The 900 class were regulars on the limestone run prior to being withdrawn from service.
"409"


Indeed they did. They were quite sooty too.

Did GM's ever run the stony? Because as a kid, I swear that some days, the loco's would look a little uglier, and a little better on others.

It wasn't until later on (after the 900's retirement) that I found out that the 900's and the GM's were different classes... at the time, I could tell there was a difference, but the differences were so minute, that I never really took it as much.
  BlueBird 255 Chief Train Controller

Location: Victoria
yep, the GM did do a stony run.
THere also was a double GM one day, gm 42- 43

ALso remember 930 gm combination Smile
  SAR621 Chief Commissioner

Hi,
   The Steamranger line was capable of taking the 900's at one stage. In the SAR days 900's frequently used the branch. ANR times stopped that however steamranger saw them running for a brief period. Now the main factors against them running, even if we did own them and they were running is theyre wheelbase is very long, plus most of our line is 80lb however some sidings and some sections of the mainline are laid with 60 plant. Dave
  Alco_Haulic Chief Commissioner

Location: Eating out...
The 900 class were regulars on the limestone run prior to being withdrawn from service.
"409"


Indeed they did. They were quite sooty too.

Did GM's ever run the stony? Because as a kid, I swear that some days, the loco's would look a little uglier, and a little better on others.

It wasn't until later on (after the 900's retirement) that I found out that the 900's and the GM's were different classes... at the time, I could tell there was a difference, but the differences were so minute, that I never really took it as much.
"Adelaide_passenger"


GM's only appeared in the early 90's. GM's 42&43 were transferred to BG to cover a MP shortage, and on a couple of occasions they even ran the stonie together.

Of course double 930's were eve better.

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