Railway Archaeology Quiz #4

 
  F224 Chief Train Controller

Location: Para Hills West SA
Hmmm, nearly two months since the last question. I don't know if this quiz was deliberately killed off or just quietly died. I'll post a question and if it goes nowhere then so be it.

Workmen were laying pipes near the Glenelg sewage works in 1956 when, to their surprise, they unearthed a railway line that had been buried by drifting sand. What had they found (where did the line run in what years, what was it's purpose and what gauge was it)?

OK, so it's more than one question. At least it is actual archaeology Smile

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  duttonbay Minister for Railways

Workmen were laying pipes near the Glenelg sewage works in 1956 when, to their surprise, they unearthed a railway line that had been buried by drifting sand. What had they found (where did the line run in what years, what was it's purpose and what gauge was it)?
"F224"

I would take a punt and say it was the Glenelg breakwater construction tramway, 1915-17, 2'6" gauge.  Just a guess...
  F224 Chief Train Controller

Location: Para Hills West SA
It was not the Glenelg Breakwater Railway that they found.
  allan Chief Commissioner

I am no expert in this field, but can recall hearing of a military line that was an extension of the Glenelg line, and serviced coastal fortifications!!!

OK, I've looked it up. The Glenelg to Grange Military Railway, 5'3 gauge, intended to link the coastal forts, and may have carried no traffic other than the construction train. It was built in 1882/1883, and was largely taken up soon after, in 1884.
  F224 Chief Train Controller

Location: Para Hills West SA
Correct. All yours, allan.
  allan Chief Commissioner

At Stirling North, near Pt Augusta, there are railways of two gauges. Nearby are the remains of another railway, of another gauge. It was very short...

What was the purpose of this third railway, and what was the gauge?

I have not yet seen any documentation dealing with this line, so would appreciate references if you have any...
  TA 2000 Chief Commissioner

Location: SA - I wish!
Didn't Pichi Richi Railway build a short narrow Gauge railway to transfer a rail car.
  Riccardo Minister for Railways

Location: Gone. Don't bother PMing here.
At Stirling North, near Pt Augusta, there are railways of two gauges. Nearby are the remains of another railway, of another gauge. It was very short...

What was the purpose of this third railway, and what was the gauge?

I have not yet seen any documentation dealing with this line, so would appreciate references if you have any...
"allan"


Guessing - 610mm, and for moving coal around in power station?
  simont141 Chief Commissioner

Location: Adelaide
There is the 4'8 1/2" Coal Line and main East-West link, There is also Pichi Richi's 3'6" Line from Quorn - Pt. Augusta. I vaguely recall seeing a line in the sand dunes just outside Pt. Augusta - I have no idea what guage though.
  allan Chief Commissioner

I'm not entirely surprised that none of you are close.

The line was isolated from the main systems, and inland of Stirling North.
  duttonbay Minister for Railways

Nothing to do with salt by any chance?  There were various 2' gauge salt tramways across SA.
  Riccardo Minister for Railways

Location: Gone. Don't bother PMing here.
Not something large - like the rails supporting a traversing crane Question
  allan Chief Commissioner

No salt - and light rail.

I'll post the answer late tomorrow night if no-one else has come up with it.
  TA 2000 Chief Commissioner

Location: SA - I wish!
No salt - and light rail.

I'll post the answer late tomorrow night if no-one else has come up with it.
"allan"


I'll have punt Board G and a short trial section of line.
  allan Chief Commissioner

The line was on Mundallio Station (sheep station, that is), whose western boundary is at Stirling North. I should have measured the gauge - but didn't! As I remember it is about 18" gauge.

The track ran from a barites mine in a gully to a lorry loading gantry at the opening of the gully, around 500m.

While the mine is defunct, and the rails removed, the perway is distinct, and a few sleepers have escaped the termites.

The line was man-powered, and if the technology works for me, the photograph of "the wagon" will show that this is truly archaeology...


OK, so I cannot work out how to post an image...perhaps someone can PM me and tell me how!


Next question is a bit more mainstream.

At Silverton, the STCo mainline, at one place, ran between two concrete walls around twelve feet apart.

Why?
  B 67 Chief Commissioner

Location: Central Gippsland
The line was on Mundallio Station (sheep station, that is), whose western boundary is at Stirling North. I should have measured the gauge - but didn't! As I remember it is about 18" gauge.

The track ran from a barites mine in a gully to a lorry loading gantry at the opening of the gully, around 500m.

While the mine is defunct, and the rails removed, the perway is distinct, and a few sleepers have escaped the termites.

The line was man-powered, and if the technology works for me, the photograph of "the wagon" will show that this is truly archaeology...


OK, so I cannot work out how to post an image...perhaps someone can PM me and tell me how!


Next question is a bit more mainstream.

At Silverton, the STCo mainline, at one place, ran between two concrete walls around twelve feet apart.

Why?
"allan"


Hmmm! Well, the silly answer is that they are that far apart so the trains could fit between them.   Very Happy

A more serious guess is that the walls protected the trains from something falling on the rails or hitting the trains. Piles of something or other. Or maybe explosives were nearby (I don't know a great deal about the STCo).
On the other hand, they may have been erected just to annoy rail photographers.   Laughing
  allan Chief Commissioner

Er...no. The walls are retaining walls about eight feet high: a gentle cutting would have been much cheaper, and much easier.
  B 67 Chief Commissioner

Location: Central Gippsland
Er...no. The walls are retaining walls about eight feet high: a gentle cutting would have been much cheaper, and much easier.
"allan"

Oh well. It was worth a try. Nothing was mentioned about them being retaining walls. Makes it harder for me to think what they were for actually.
  allan Chief Commissioner

Hey, there's a fairly broad clue here - the question, rephrased, is "why build a railway - sorry, tramway - between retaining walls when it would be easier and cheaper to dig a shallow cutting?"
  B 67 Chief Commissioner

Location: Central Gippsland
Hey, there's a fairly broad clue here - the question, rephrased, is "why build a railway - sorry, tramway - between retaining walls when it would be easier and cheaper to dig a shallow cutting?"
"allan"


Some sort of problem with erosion perhaps.
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
That has jogged the old memory, and I think it was because the width of the right-of-way that could be obtained when the line was built was very restricted.

Peter
  Riccardo Minister for Railways

Location: Gone. Don't bother PMing here.
That has jogged the old memory, and I think it was because the width of the right-of-way that could be obtained when the line was built was very restricted.

Peter
"pjknife"


Is it something to do with the legal definition of railway/tramway?

I remember this affected the crewing of the Yass Tramway

My guess is they were only legally entitled to the minimum loading gauge, and any other property owners could build this close because it was a tramway, not a railway.
  TA 2000 Chief Commissioner

Location: SA - I wish!
That has jogged the old memory, and I think it was because the width of the right-of-way that could be obtained when the line was built was very restricted.

Peter
"pjknife"


Is it something to do with the legal definition of railway/tramway?

I remember this affected the crewing of the Yass Tramway

My guess is they were only legally entitled to the minimum loading gauge, and any other property owners could build this close because it was a tramway, not a railway.
"Riccardo"


In south australia it was legisive requirement only. Because only the SA Goverment could operate railways up until I think AN took over SAR. The only difference between tramway/railway is a tramway company was only repositble for track and ballest. As a railway the SAR in this case was respositable for everything from one fence to the other and everything else in between eg track.
  allan Chief Commissioner

That has jogged the old memory, and I think it was because the width of the right-of-way that could be obtained when the line was built was very restricted.

Peter
"pjknife"


That's near enough for me...  Real estate in Silverton was at a premium - how quickly can things change - so STCo was granted a very narrow path.

Over to pjknife...
  pjknife Assistant Commissioner

Location: Port Lincoln
OK, let's try this one. A couple of short sections of an 18" gauge tramway are still in place within 4 km of Port Lincoln. What tramway was it?

Peter

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